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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Nicholas J. Ashill and David Jobber

At the very core of Marketing Information Systems (MkIS) design is the identification of the marketing information needs of decision‐makers. Information needs can be…

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Abstract

At the very core of Marketing Information Systems (MkIS) design is the identification of the marketing information needs of decision‐makers. Information needs can be defined as the user specifications of information characteristics involved in information seeking, and refer to those qualities of information perceived by managers to be “useful” to facilitate their decision making. Drawing on empirical results from three sets of literature and from studies of information systems design (particularly management and accounting information systems design), the authors review a framework for exploring the design of an MkIS. A qualitative study examining the information needs of senior marketing executives is also reported and discussed. The results, based on interviews with 20 senior marketing executives, indicate that marketing information needs can be defined using six information characteristics.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2020

Nicholas J. Ashill, Rania W. Semaan, Tanya Gibbs and Aaron Gazley

Despite major market-orientated reforms to enhance the competitive advantage of Russian domestic firms, the antecedents and consequences of frontline employee (FLE…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite major market-orientated reforms to enhance the competitive advantage of Russian domestic firms, the antecedents and consequences of frontline employee (FLE) customer orientation (CO) remain poorly understood. Acknowledging this paucity of research, the authors draw upon a hierarchical model of personality to examine personality trait determinants of CO and job performance in the context of the Russian financial services sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 186 FLEs using a self-administered survey questionnaire and analyzed using AMOS.

Findings

The results identify which basic personality traits matter in translating FLE CO behavior into higher job performance in the Russian retail-banking sector.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study include the generalizability of the findings within one organizational context. Future research should examine whether the found associations hold true for FLEs working in other service sectors in other parts of the country.

Practical implications

Study findings differ significantly to Western-based research and provide valuable insight into the process that motivates Russian FLEs in a commercial retail setting to perform better in their jobs.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study that employs a hierarchical model of the effects of basic personality traits on FLE CO and job performance in a former socialist/communist economy. We also advance existing research on FLE CO by distinguishing between two types of CO behavior. Findings provide an understanding of those personality traits that affect the ability of Russian FLEs to better satisfy customer needs and to interact and serve customers in an enjoyable way.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2019

Hasan Dinçer, Tuba Bozaykut-Buk, Şenol Emir, Serhat Yuksel and Nicholas Ashill

The purpose of this paper is to present a multidimensional evaluation of brand equity performance incorporating dimensions adopted from the balance scorecard (BSC…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a multidimensional evaluation of brand equity performance incorporating dimensions adopted from the balance scorecard (BSC) approach to business performance.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, text mining is used for automatic extraction of valuable information from textual data such as the financial reports of firms. Instead of expert opinions, linguistic scales built upon outcomes of text mining are used as inputs for decision-making. The proposed model combines fuzzy DEMATEL (FDEMATEL), fuzzy ANP (FANP), fuzzy TOPSIS (FTOPSIS) and fuzzy VIKOR (FVIKOR) methods for weighting criteria and ranking alternatives.

Findings

Using data from five privatized firms in Turkey, the study’s findings demonstrate that the customer is the most important dimension of brand equity performance evaluation. Cash flow and brand loyalty are identified as the most important criteria in the measurement of brand equity performance.

Practical implications

Findings highlight the importance of firms taking action to increase consumer perceptions, attitudes and behaviors in the privatization processes. For this purpose, privatized firms need to understand the expectations of customers to increase customer satisfaction and loyalty and therefore improve brand equity.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to literature in several important ways. First, by adopting the BSC approach, it proposes a holistic and a multidimensional model for measuring brand equity performance. Second, the study offers a novel methodology using a hybrid multi-criteria decision-making model designed for the fuzzy environment. Third, the study uses the knowledge extraction tool of text mining in the fuzzy decision-making process. Finally, the study evaluates the brand equity performance of privatized firms in an emerging country context.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Nicholas J. Ashill, John Davies and Anthony Joe

This study contributes to continuing work on the development of a conceptual framework to better understand sponsorship, consumer response towards sponsorship efforts, and…

Abstract

This study contributes to continuing work on the development of a conceptual framework to better understand sponsorship, consumer response towards sponsorship efforts, and the contribution of sponsorship to customer-based brand equity, by seeking to validate a set of consumer-related attitudes to sponsorship. In particular, the study focuses on establishing the properties of consumer-related attitudinal constructs in the context of sponsorship of an annual national sporting event, the New Zealand Rugby Football Union's National Provincial Championship. Such constructs and their embedded scales will enable sponsorship managers to assess and distinguish consumer reactions to the event itself, to the commercialisation of the event, and to identify the consumer behaviours likely to benefit the sponsor of the event.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Jean Boisvert and Nicholas J. Ashill

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the impact of branding strategies on horizontal and downward line extensions of French luxury brands in a cross-national…

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2934

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the impact of branding strategies on horizontal and downward line extensions of French luxury brands in a cross-national context (France vs USA).

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on a two line extensions (horizontal/downward) × three branding strategies (direct brand/sub-brand/standalone brand) x two country (France/USA) between-subjects ANOVA design.

Findings

The study shows that the subtyping effect created by a sub-branded luxury downward line extension tends to be rated similarly to a direct branded extension which oppose previous beliefs put forward in non-luxury settings. In contrast, a new independent/standalone extension fully uses the subtyping effect which helps attenuate this risk related to luxury downward stretches. The study also found that the effect of gender in cross-national settings must always be taken into consideration as significant variations occur in the process.

Research limitations/implications

The study covers two countries but should be replicated in other cross-national contexts.

Practical implications

This study helps marketing managers of luxury brands make a better decision when it comes to launching vertical line extensions (upscale/downward) by carefully using types of branding strategies and relevant communications whether women and/or men are targeted in cross-national contexts.

Originality/value

This study breaks new ground in the international luxury literature by providing key theoretical and managerial insights in terms of launching new downward line extensions with the proper use of branding strategies when targeting specific genders.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Volkan Yeniaras, Ilker Kaya and Nick Ashill

The purpose of this paper is to offer a theoretical and empirical understanding of how social ties affect innovation behavior and new product performance in Turkey, which…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a theoretical and empirical understanding of how social ties affect innovation behavior and new product performance in Turkey, which is an emerging economy where high levels of economic and political uncertainties exist.The authors examine whether innovation behavior binds the political and business ties of the firm to new product performance. They also examine if these effects are contingent on variations in the institutional environment and market environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling and mediation analyses were used on a sample of 344 small- and medium-sized enterprises in Istanbul.

Findings

Business ties are positively related to exploratory innovation behavior and political ties hamper such behavior. The authors also show that government support hinders firms’ disruptive innovation while encouraging incremental innovation behavior. The authors further demonstrate that the positive and indirect relation of business ties to new product performance through exploratory and exploitative innovation is largely insensitive to changes in market and institutional environments. Political ties are negatively (positively) and indirectly related to new product performance through exploratory (exploitative) innovation.

Practical implications

Managers should choose the form of their personal interactions (political and/or business) based on the type of innovation that is being pursued. Additionally, managers should consider both the institutional environment and the market environment as important contingencies in their decision of whether to invest resources in developing social ties to build innovation behavior.

Originality/value

The authors offer a deeper perspective of how social ties in emerging economies affect new product performance by considering exploratory and exploitative innovation behavior as mediating mechanisms. These mediating effects are conditional on institutional and market environments.

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Tanya Gibbs and Nicholas J. Ashill

This study aims to empirically test a model of affective and behavioural job outcomes grounded in Bagozzi's reformulation of attitude theory in the novel context of a…

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3126

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically test a model of affective and behavioural job outcomes grounded in Bagozzi's reformulation of attitude theory in the novel context of a retail bank in Russia.

Design/methodology/approach

Frontline employees (FLEs) completed a self‐administered questionnaire on how factors characterizing high performance work practices (HPWPs) affect their job satisfaction and organizational commitment, and how these job attitudes impact their job performance.

Findings

Results suggest there is a significant influence of HPWPs on job attitudes, but only job satisfaction influences job performance.

Practical implications

Job satisfaction is identified as a critical work lever and should receive priority from management relative to actions designed to foster organizational commitment.

Originality/value

Despite the breadth and depth of international research on service quality, to date there has been no study of high performance work practices and their impact on the job performance of service workers in Russia. Retail banks, after operating for years in a highly regulated environment and virtually devoid of competition, now recognize that their very survival depends on the delivery of quality service at the frontline.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Nicholas J. Ashill and Ugur Yavas

The study reported in this article investigates whether or not consumers from Turkey and New Zealand attach similar levels of importance to various information sources in…

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1591

Abstract

The study reported in this article investigates whether or not consumers from Turkey and New Zealand attach similar levels of importance to various information sources in their purchase decisions and whether they are similar (dissimilar) in their opinions on advertisement in various media. Customers surveyed in Istanbul and Wellington serve as the database. Study results and their implications are discussed.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2010

Michel Rod and Nicholas J. Ashill

This paper seeks to examine the role of customer orientation in a model of affective and behavioural job outcomes grounded in Bagozzi's reformulation of attitude theory in…

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2415

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the role of customer orientation in a model of affective and behavioural job outcomes grounded in Bagozzi's reformulation of attitude theory in the new public management context of a former public sector government department that has undergone corporatisation and now operates as a state‐owned enterprise (SOE).

Design/methodology/approach

Frontline employees (FLEs) complete a self‐administered questionnaire on how customer orientation affects their job satisfaction and organisational commitment, and how these job attitudes impact service recovery performance and turnover intentions. Data obtained from the FLEs were analysed using the structural equation modeling‐based partial least squares methodology.

Findings

Seven of eight hypotheses are supported. Results suggest that there is a significant influence of customer orientation on job satisfaction and organisational commitment, which in turn influence service recovery performance and turnover intentions.

Practical implications

The research advances understanding of the influence of customer orientation on affective and behavioural job outcomes. SOE managers can take actions on a number of different fronts to assist progress towards improving FLE service recovery efforts and reduce turnover intentions.

Originality/value

The impact of customer orientation on affective job outcomes (job satisfaction and organisational commitment) and behavioural job outcomes (service recovery performance and turnover intentions) has not been investigated in the context of SOEs.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2013

Michel Rod and Nicholas J. Ashill

The aim of this study is to draw on various models of burnout and test hypotheses relating to anticipated differences in the burnout process between inbound versus…

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3006

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to draw on various models of burnout and test hypotheses relating to anticipated differences in the burnout process between inbound versus outbound call centre agents. This is achieved by comparing the magnitude of the relationships in the sequence of customer stressors → emotional exhaustion → depersonalization → reduced personal accomplishment across a sample of inbound and outbound call centre agents working in a large retail bank call centre in New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from inbound and outbound call centre agents of a large retail bank call centre in New Zealand via a self‐administered survey questionnaire electronically distributed to all 195 call centre agents working in the bank's two call centre locations. Data obtained from the call centre agents were analysed using the SEM‐based partial least squares (PLS) methodology.

Findings

The findings of the study reveal significant differences between inbound and outbound call centre agents in terms of the extent to which emotional exhaustion impacts depersonalisation as well as the extent to which depersonalisation influences feelings of reduced personal accomplishment.

Practical implications

The research advances understanding of differences in the burnout process as perceived by inbound versus outbound call centre agents. Call centre management might consider improving the work environment to bring about greater job discretion/autonomy, greater job variety and performance monitoring in order to attenuate the stronger impact of these relationships in an inbound context.

Originality/value

These findings extend our understanding of these phenomena in the largely unexplored yet important context of call centre agent‐customer interaction in specifically highlighting differences between inbound and outbound call centre agent burnout.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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