Search results

1 – 10 of 128
Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2021

Holger Joerg Schmidt, Nicholas Ind, Francisco Guzmán and Eric Kennedy

This paper aims to shed light on the emerging position of companies taking stances on sociopolitical issues and the impact this has on consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to shed light on the emerging position of companies taking stances on sociopolitical issues and the impact this has on consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses focus groups, interviews and consumer experiments in various countries, to provide insights as to why brands are taking sociopolitical stances.

Findings

Consumers expect brands to take a stance on sociopolitical issues. However, to be credible, a stance needs to be rooted in a long-term commitment that aligns with the brand’s strategy and values. Perceived authenticity is key.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should aim at broader generalizability and should address various industries.

Practical implications

Differentiating a brand through a sociopolitical stance requires a strategic approach. Brand managers need to identify which issues they should support, how to engage with them and the risks and opportunities involved.

Originality/value

While the impact of brands adopting a sociopolitical stance has been discussed in the mainstream media, there has been a lack of empirical evidence to support the arguments. The results of the four studies discussed in the paper provide insights and demonstrate the brand-related opportunities and risks of taking a sociopolitical stance.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Nicholas Ind and Goran Svensson

Downloads
144

Abstract

Details

European Business Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Nicholas Ind

Downloads
519

Abstract

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Nicholas Ind

To point out the limitations of on over‐scientific approach to branding.

Downloads
1698

Abstract

Purpose

To point out the limitations of on over‐scientific approach to branding.

Design/methodology/approach

Discussion of case studies in a philosophical theoretical framework.

Findings

“Getting close to the customer” is a flawed concept. Rather the emphasis should be on people and the nature of relationships.

Practical implications

Brand managers should become unified with the customer rather than thinking they are close to the customer through the abstraction of market research.

Originality/value

Points out that credibility is not derived from statistical analysis alone, but through a genuine and deep understanding of the customer.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Nicholas Ind and Nick Coates

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the diverse strands that underpin the still emerging concept of co‐creation. The paper aims to suggest that there are…

Downloads
7238

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the diverse strands that underpin the still emerging concept of co‐creation. The paper aims to suggest that there are alternative views rooted in psychotherapy, critical theory, software development and design that can help provide a richer understanding of the meaning of co‐creation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a general review of the field based on the literature and the different strands that comprise it.

Findings

Co‐creation is often seen from a managerial perspective. In this general review of the concept, the authors demonstrate that co‐creation can also be seen from the perspective of consumers and other stakeholders. This also shifts the idea of co‐creation away from a strongly rational approach to one that is more spontaneous and playful.

Practical implications

The review focuses primarily on consumers and how they can be encouraged to collaborate with one another to meet their needs for socialisation and meaning making and how organizations can influence and use the insights of co‐creation.

Originality/value

Over the past decade there has been a rapidly growing interest in co‐creation, but much of the research focuses on the creation and management of online communities. By recognising the antecedents of managerial co‐creation and its diverse heritage, it is possible to see the concept as a development of other practices. By drawing on these practices, it is possible to look at co‐creation in a new light.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Rune Bjerke and Nicholas Ind

The purpose of this paper is to explore new constructs related to organizations, art and physical environment. Further, an intention was to explain and discuss whether…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore new constructs related to organizations, art and physical environment. Further, an intention was to explain and discuss whether investments in the physical environment in the form of art, design and architecture do have an effect on employees.

Design/methodology/approach

To conclude whether aesthetics had an impact on employees in terms of job satisfaction, motivation and their self-perception of their own ability to provide customer service, the authors undertook a quantitative study of 222 employees in seven companies. The authors subsequently commenced five in-depth, semi-structured interviews with four accessible corporate art buyers and one curator to identify the main motivations for purchasing art and placing it in the work place.

Findings

With regard to perceptions of art, design and architecture, the physical environment is perceived as a whole and seems to play a significant role in organizational life for employees in companies that have invested in art. The research implies, however, that the companies that invested in art, design and architecture, despite the positive influence on employees’ self-perceived service ability, did not accumulate benefits on service ability relative to employees in companies without art.

Practical implications

Managers should cautiously reflect on their motivations for investing in art, design and architecture. Useful motivations might include projecting a desired external image or decoration or expressing connection to a community. Investing in art, design and architecture independent of what the organization is trying to do strategically will create cosmetic solutions that lack any wider purpose.

Originality/value

Despite increased corporate interest in aesthetics, little research has been done to determine the effect on employees. The research shortage may be due to the challenge of understanding the meaning of the visible expressions. This paper is a contribution to strengthen the knowledge of the impact of workspace aesthetics on employees (the authors subsequently undertook five in-depth, semi-structured interviews with four accessible corporate art buyers at Storebrand (insurance and banking corporation), Telenor (mobile operator), Hydro (aluminium company), Nordic Choice Hotels and one curator).

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Rune Bjerke, Nicholas Ind and Donatella De Paoli

This paper sets out to explore the impact of aesthetics on employee satisfaction and motivation.

Downloads
8332

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to explore the impact of aesthetics on employee satisfaction and motivation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on organisational aesthetics and organisational culture theory and interviews with employees at Norwegian telecommunications company Telenor – a significant investor in art, design and architecture.

Findings

There are potential connections between artifacts (as an expression of organisational culture) and employee satisfaction, identity, mood, creativity and motivation. Aesthetics seems to be particularly important to employees working with the business segment because of the face‐to‐face interaction between employees and customers. It appears that the “visual Telenor” influences employees' identification with the organisation.

Practical implications

When organisations invest in art, design and architecture, they need to be active in engaging employees with its meaning and relevance. If employees are not engaged, the aesthetic environment will not stimulate creativity or influence job satisfaction and motivation.

Originality/value

The findings of this paper have enabled the creation of a matrix with four different categories defined by the degree of financial investments in art, design and architecture and the extent of investments in activities engaging employees. A conceptual model is proposed that identifies possible connections between aesthetics and employee performance.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Gerard McCusker

This study attempts to fill the gap in organisational identity literature. It describes the use of sound in communicating brand identity and explains the roles of the…

Abstract

This study attempts to fill the gap in organisational identity literature. It describes the use of sound in communicating brand identity and explains the roles of the principal ‘players’ in the production of one organisation's audio identity. As a case study, this research focuses on Radio Scotland's need for an identifiable sound, and also details the process involved in the design and implementation of its identity. Information about the case was generated via unstructured, open‐ended interviews with key informants within Radio Scotland and external parties who participated in the project. A chronology is used to present the findings of the case with analysis of the data led by four key research issues concerning: —sound's ability to communicate identity, —the balance between science and intuition in designing audio identity, —responsibility for sound identity production, and —requisite qualifications or knowledge for shaping audio identity. Conclusions show the use of sound to be instrumental in communicating Radio Scotland's identity, with the author suggesting that more research should be undertaken into the role of audio designs given the growth explosion in audio visual communications technology.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Demetris Vrontis and Petros Lois

Downloads
325

Abstract

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

1 – 10 of 128