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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2016

Jan Horst Keppler

This English translation of Heinrich von Stackelberg’s Marktform und Gleichgewicht will be welcomed by economists working in the field of industrial organisation and…

Abstract

This English translation of Heinrich von Stackelberg’s Marktform und Gleichgewicht will be welcomed by economists working in the field of industrial organisation and beyond. It has been overdue for more than 80 years. This translation will allow matters to be set straight concerning a number of fundamental theoretical issues connected to Stackelberg’s work as well as allow to clarify a number of misunderstandings that go back to the first reviews of Stackelberg’s 1934 classic on competition theory.

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Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-960-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Sue Dopson, Jonathan Mant and Nicholas Hicks

The translation of research into practice is currently a high‐profileissue in the NHS. A number of regions have undertaken work in this area.Reports on a project that is…

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Abstract

The translation of research into practice is currently a high‐profile issue in the NHS. A number of regions have undertaken work in this area. Reports on a project that is part of the Anglia and Oxford Regions′s “Getting Research into Practice” (GRiP) initiative. The work focuses on the use of steroids in pre‐term delivery, a procedure that medical evidence suggests can reduce neo‐natal mortality and morbidity. Presents a number of findings which suggest that getting research into practice does not merely rest on the availability of well‐researched evidence.

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Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1986

Anghel N. Rugina

The first Principia Mathematica (1686) by Sir Isaac Newton with reference to natural philosophy and his system of the world has largely contributed to the first revolution

Abstract

The first Principia Mathematica (1686) by Sir Isaac Newton with reference to natural philosophy and his system of the world has largely contributed to the first revolution in scientific thinking in modern times. It has created the conceptual basis of modern science in the classical tradition by providing the tools of analysis and the technique of reasoning in terms of stability—from—within or, as we would say today, the model of stable equilibrium conditions.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 13 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Peter J. Boettke

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Philosophy, Politics, and Austrian Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-405-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Anghel N. Rugina

Introduces Hicks, from the UK, and his classical upbringing, including his mathematical scholarships and Oxford. Looks at his early career as a lecturer at the London…

Abstract

Introduces Hicks, from the UK, and his classical upbringing, including his mathematical scholarships and Oxford. Looks at his early career as a lecturer at the London School of Economics and his development in the economics field. Concludes that Hicks was an original thinker, giving thanks to his immense contributions.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Nicholas Gilmour, Tristram Hicks and Simon Dilloway

The purpose of this paper is to examine – using crime script analysis – the practical effectiveness of internationally endorsed and universally recognised…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine – using crime script analysis – the practical effectiveness of internationally endorsed and universally recognised counter-terrorism financing (CTF) standards in preventing the movement of money for the purposes of terrorism. The paper does not seek to examine the originating circumstances of terrorist finances or how laundered value is assigned.

Design/methodology/approach

Preliminary evaluation focuses on the discrepancies between the practices of money laundering and terrorist financing. Following an introduction to crime scripts, internationally endorsed anti money laundering (AML)/CTF practices are discussed to identify the process used to trace, prevent and limit money laundering and terrorist financing. Several terrorist financing case studies are then aligned to the process of crime script analysis to determine whether existing AML/CTF practices are effective in preventing terrorist financing.

Findings

The AML model “Placement, layering, integration” is only relevant to CTF in the comparatively rare cases when the origin of the money is crime. This creates a false sense of security through over reliance on AML/CTF for CTF purposes. A crime script approach can be applied to terrorist finance, but it is currently hindered by insufficient reporting of low level financing of terrorists, their addresses and associates. Law enforcement make insufficient use of financial intelligence – as a routine practice – in their crime and terrorist investigations; they have not adopted parallel investigation as a routine approach and consequently remain largely unconnected with the AML/CTF regime.

Practical implications

Utilising terrorist financing case studies, this paper identifies that existing AML/CTF international standards and practices are not adequate for controlling the movement of funds for financing terrorism because of the lack of focus on a specific script that aligns to known terrorist finance methodologies. While the paper identifies that existing AML/CTF international standards are thorough, the process underpinning the financing of terrorism is too dissimilar to the process of money laundering, namely, placement, layering, and integration, to support practices associated with terrorism prevention and detection.

Originality/value

This paper provides an examination of the practicalities behind the countering of terrorist financing from a compliance and investigative perspective. The paper is of interest to those involved in policy, compliance and investigations associated with terrorist financing.

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Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Joanna Carlisle, Ramudu Bhanugopan and Alan Fish

This paper seeks to provide an overview of the concept of training needs analysis (TNA), current practice, models and the impact that training needs analysis currently has…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide an overview of the concept of training needs analysis (TNA), current practice, models and the impact that training needs analysis currently has on nurses in public hospitals in Australia. Thus, the paper should aid future research in the area of TNA of nurses through helping researchers to clarify the conceptual boundaries of training needs of nurses; providing a theoretical framework that could help researchers in framing their research efforts in the area; and establishing a research agenda and identifying the impact this research will potentially have on Human Resource managers in hospitals across Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the TNA process by examining literature regarding the importance and benefits of TNA, issues relating to TNA and current practice and models. This paper then looks at how TNA applies to, and is currently practised within, the healthcare industry, specifically amongst a group of nurses. This paper also addresses how TNA tools relate to healthcare workers, particularly nurses, within Australia and how it may be able to improve the current TNA process for nurses in Australia.

Findings

The specific contribution of the current paper is in developing a logical model of TNA for nurses employed in healthcare organizations in Australia. In so doing insights are drawn from a number of discreet literature bases.

Originality/value

Research in this area has been carried out primarily in the UK, in the USA, and in other countries. Unfortunately, TNA for nurses in Australia is very much an under‐researched topic. Equally, there is scant research available into the importance and benefits of conducting appropriate TNA for nurses in Australia. The research that has been conducted involving training needs of nurses in Australia has not been focused on a TNA using a psychometrically valid tool, nor has the research considered the factors that may influence the training needs of particular nurses or organizations.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Abstract

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Documents on Modern History of Economic Thought: Part C
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-998-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Seirgei Miller, Theo C. Haupt and Nicholas Chileshe

The cooperative education model adopted by Universities of Technology in South Africa embodies the notion that both education and training are equally essential. It…

Abstract

The cooperative education model adopted by Universities of Technology in South Africa embodies the notion that both education and training are equally essential. It incorporates productive work into the curriculum as a regular and integral element of a higher education course. The present model involves three cooperative partners namely, the university, student and employer. It should, therefore, be evident that cooperative education has two main components, namely an academic component and an experiential learning component, both of which are integral to its success. To enable students to understand the relationship between academic subjects and the world of work, cooperative education involves restructuring the educational experience. For some time, industry employer representatives have suggested that education and training offered at Universities of Technology do not always address the needs of industry. They argue that graduates lack the necessary theoretical skills, training and managerial understanding to ensure immediate meaningful employment. These inadequacies contribute to unemployment and the lack of advancement opportunity within their chosen careers. In addition, there is a need to examine the perceptions of students regarding course content before they go into industry. This was the motivation for this research. The aims of the research project are twofold. Firstly, to examine the course content offered within the civil engineering diploma programme, and secondly to measure the levels of subject satisfaction. Using an exploratory approach through a survey of 123 students, this study explores the course content and satisfaction levels based on study areas in the first year program. The results indicate that students generally perceive the subject Communication Skills to be least satisfying whereas Mathematics is considered to be the most satisfying subject. This paper concludes by presenting the subject satisfaction index tool which contributes to the range of intervention strategies as envisaged by the CIDB. This further contributes towards the improvement of the overall quality of University of Technology civil engineering academic programs and also the subsequent productive employability of its graduates.

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Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Abdul Latif Alhassan and Nicholas Biekpe

The purpose of this paper is to examine the empirical effect of competition on cost and profit efficiency in the South African non-life insurance market in a three-stage analysis.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the empirical effect of competition on cost and profit efficiency in the South African non-life insurance market in a three-stage analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

Using annual firm level data on 80 non-life insurance companies from 2007 to 2012, the authors first employ the stochastic frontier analysis (SFA) to estimate cost and profit efficiency scores. In the second stage, the authors measure insurance market competition using the Panzar-Rosse (P-R) H-statistics. In the final stage, the authors estimate a fixed-effects panel regression model which controls for heteroskedasticity to examine the effect of competition on the estimated efficiency scores. Firm size, diversification, age, risk, reinsurance and leverage are employed as control variables.

Findings

From the SFA, the authors find average cost and profit efficiency of 80.08 and 45.71 per cent, respectively. This suggests that non-life insurers have high levels of efficiency in cost and low efficiency in profit. The annual estimates of the P-R H-statistics also suggest that firms in the market earn revenues under conditions of monopolistic competition. The authors find a positive effect of competition on cost and profit efficiency to validate the “quiet-life” hypothesis which posits that competition improves efficiency.

Practical implications

Regulatory policies should be directed towards enhancing competition to improve on the low profit earning potential of firms in the non-life market.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study presents the first application of a non-structural measure of competition to examine the empirical relationship between competition and efficiency in insurance markets.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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