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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Nicholas C. Williamson, Grace Kissling, Nancy Cassill and Dmitriy Odinokov

Two hypotheses concerning two variables that potentially influence the “add/drop” foreignmarket decisions of U.S. exporters of sewing machines are developed and…

Abstract

Two hypotheses concerning two variables that potentially influence the “add/drop” foreign market decisions of U.S. exporters of sewing machines are developed and empirically tested. The variables are import market potential, and a surrogate measure of import market competitiveness. A third variable, concerning a developing country’s “trade regime” – Import Substituting, Export Promoting (Bhagwati, 1978) – is employed as a control variable in the tests. The two hypotheses are confirmed, and the results shed light on how U.S. exporters of sewing machines should analyze data on the three variables en route to adjusting their respective portfolios of export markets in a context of making add/drop foreign market decisions. The results of the research potentially contribute to three different literatures: the international marketing literature, the competitiveness literature and the “trade regime” literature in international economics.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

Nicholas C. Williamson and Daniel C. Bello

The instability of the relationships which Export Management Companies have with their Manufacturer‐Suppliers is, perhaps, the most pressing problem which the EMCs have in…

Abstract

The instability of the relationships which Export Management Companies have with their Manufacturer‐Suppliers is, perhaps, the most pressing problem which the EMCs have in their long‐term development as viable export marketing channel entities. Three different variables were empirically tested as possibly affecting the stability of EMC/M‐S relationships: (1) the “operating arrangement” which the EMC has with the M‐S; (2) whether or not the EMC “takes title” to products which it markets abroad; and (3) the size of a given M‐S's export sales generated by the EMC. All three variables were shown to affect the stability of the EMC/M‐S dyadic relationship.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2006

Varinder M. Sharma, Vincent P. Taiani and Arif A. Sariteke

The impact of e‐business on export management companies (EMCs) has been debated for some time and several reasons for their survival have been forwarded. Based upon the…

Abstract

The impact of e‐business on export management companies (EMCs) has been debated for some time and several reasons for their survival have been forwarded. Based upon the resource‐based perspective of the firm, this study provides a far more fundamental reason for the survival of the well‐established EMCs‐their market‐based assets. Furthermore, this study analyzes the impact of e‐business proliferation on the well‐established EMCs transaction creating and physical fulfillment exporting services and their efficiency and effectiveness.

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International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Nicholas C. Williamson, Joy Bhadury, Kay Dobie, Victor Ofori‐Boadu, Samuel Parker Troy and Osei Yeboah

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether one can infer the identities of specific business and management coursework topics that owner/managers of wineries want…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether one can infer the identities of specific business and management coursework topics that owner/managers of wineries want to have addressed by a wine industry‐specific educational institution by assessing upstream and downstream vertical integration strategies of their respective wineries.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory empirical research involves the gathering of relevant information by way of telephone interviews and using closed end questions. The theory of the resource‐based view (RBV) of the firm is the theoretical framework that was employed in developing relevant hypotheses.

Findings

The results demonstrate that one can predict the types of business and management courses that owner/managers of wineries want to have offered by assessing realized upstream and/or downstream vertical integration strategies of their respective wineries.

Originality/value

The research creates a bridge between research involving the RBV and the identification of needs of persons in various parts of the wine value chain. Such persons might either become involved in conceiving and/or rendering wine industry‐specific business and management instruction, or benefit by taking business coursework that has been established as relevant for them by this research.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Nicholas C. Williamson and Joy Bhadury

The purpose of this empirical research is to identify the distinguishing operating characteristics of wineries that use what is alleged to be the most profitable channel…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this empirical research is to identify the distinguishing operating characteristics of wineries that use what is alleged to be the most profitable channel of distribution for marketing wine in the USA: the wine club.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design entails the contrasting of the Web site-reflected operating features of wineries that support wine clubs with wineries that do not.

Findings

Support was found for the great majority of operating features identified in the literature as likely characterizing the operations of wineries with wine clubs. A notable exception concerns the lack of confirmation of hypotheses concerning “Wine 2.0” variables.

Research limitations/implications

In the apparent pursuit of higher profits, owners and managers of wineries with wine clubs more frequently adopt operating features that expose them to objective competitive comparisons than do owners and managers with other wineries. The former are also more prone to advertise on their Web sites a variety of offers that collectively constitute a more valuable quid pro quo in their relationships with consumer buyers than appears to be the case with other wineries. Strategically, results demonstrate that a winery’s adoption of a wine club is not a part of an evolutionary process of wineries in general.

Originality/value

There has been no other published empirical research that concerned the identification of distinguishing operating features of wineries that use what has been argued to be the most profitable channel for marketing wine at retail in the USA: the wine club channel. Winery owners and managers will find particular value in the results and implications of the research.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Nir Kshetri, Nicholas C. Williamson and Andreea Schiopu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impacts of economic and political factors on advertising industry in the enlarging EU.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impacts of economic and political factors on advertising industry in the enlarging EU.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employed random effect time series cross‐section (TSCS) models and cross sectional regressions to investigate the impacts of these factors on advertising industry in the enlarging EU.

Findings

It was found that marketers' advertising spending decisions in these economies are driven by consumers' income level and FDI inflow. Civil liberty related variables, on the other hand, were found to moderate the relationship between income and advertising spending.

Practical implications

This paper helps managers and practitioners understand the dynamics of advertising industry in the enlarging EU as well as in other parts of the world. Some fruitful avenues for future research include examination of consumers' perceptions of advertising in the rapidly changing Eastern European countries; use of qualitative methods to deepen the understanding of how consumers make sense of different forms of advertising; and in‐depth analysis of advertising industries in selected economies.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is two‐fold. First, it is one of the most comprehensive cross‐country advertising studies examining the drivers of advertising industries in 28 European countries. Second, it employs TSCS models which allow for differences in behavior over cross sectional units as well as the differences in behavior over time for a given cross section and hence are likely to be consistent with the way the data were generated.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Lyn S. Amine

This paper is positioned as a manager's guide to the new export opportunity, the export trading company (ETC). ETCs are defined in terms of both the legislative provisions…

Abstract

This paper is positioned as a manager's guide to the new export opportunity, the export trading company (ETC). ETCs are defined in terms of both the legislative provisions and practical managerial opportunities. A number of different ETC models are presented, both hypothetical and real. Guidelines for creating or joining an ETC are offered, and expectations for short‐term performance are assessed by reference to practical examples of new ETCs. Perspectives for future development of U.S. ETCs are also presented.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Joseph V. Anderson

Somewhere along the line marketers got off track, especially at the academic level. At its core, the discipline is one of persuasion and influence. Yet the concept of…

Abstract

Somewhere along the line marketers got off track, especially at the academic level. At its core, the discipline is one of persuasion and influence. Yet the concept of power is conspicuously absent from most works on the nature of the marketing effort. That's a hit like trying to teach skydiving by ignoring gravity. Sometimes the results are also similar, in dealing with policy and strategy. The author provides a brief history of the demise of the power concept in marketing and offers a contextual argument for its inclusion as a central tenet of the discipline's conceptual core.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Gregori Galofré-Vilà

In this chapter, network analysis has been used to map out disciplinary areas of research and authorship in economic history. A total of 5,330 peer-reviewed articles…

Abstract

In this chapter, network analysis has been used to map out disciplinary areas of research and authorship in economic history. A total of 5,330 peer-reviewed articles published in the leading economic history journals has been surveyed. Since 1980, the number of publications has risen and then rapidly accelerated over the last 2 decades. This rise has been fueled by research being conducted within European universities instead of US or UK ones.

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-179-7

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

Yue Wang and Stephen Nicholas

Drawing upon new institutional economics and contracting theory, this chapter extends the concept of headquarter (HQ)–subsidiary relationships to capture unconventional…

Abstract

Drawing upon new institutional economics and contracting theory, this chapter extends the concept of headquarter (HQ)–subsidiary relationships to capture unconventional types of subsidiary organizations in transition economies. A conceptual framework is first developed to examine how the interplay between institutions and subsidiaries shapes HQ–subsidiary relations in rapidly changing institutional environments. It is then applied to study contractual joint ventures in China, an important, yet often misunderstood, form of multinational subsidiary operation. The research sheds new light on how parent firms design contract provisions, credible commitments, and contract renegotiation mechanisms for the effective management of joint venture subsidiaries. These findings have important implications for future inquiry into the interplay between institutions and organizations in safeguarding subsidiary operations in transition economies.

Details

Managing, Subsidiary Dynamics: Headquarters Role, Capability Development, and China Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-667-6

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