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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Cheng-Hao Steve Chen, Meng-Shan Sharon Wu, Bang Nguyen and Stacey Li

The purpose of this study is to provide insights into value creation within a newspaper consumption community, adding to current information research by demonstrating how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide insights into value creation within a newspaper consumption community, adding to current information research by demonstrating how an atypical consumption community can co-create value in ways different from those identified in extant research. The upheaval of the newspaper industry’s business model and value chain in the face of digitalisation has led to significant decreases in newspaper revenue. To stay successful in the modern digital climate, it is essential for newspapers to utilise the interactive features of Web 2.0 to find new value sources. To do so, it is necessary to focus not just on tangible financial value but also symbolic value. The study supports the notion that consumers collectively co-create value through consumption community practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the conduction of a netnographic exploration of active consumers on the Guardian website and interviews with passive consumers, the study’s aims of understanding co-creation in digitally facilitated newspaper consumption environment were achieved.

Findings

The findings have opened up new ways in which newspapers can harness value through consumption communities as well as suggesting the future scope of research. This study indicates that newspapers foster an atypical environment for the creation of a cohesive consumption community – something that has failed to be appreciated in extant information research – because their diverse content influences the formation of multiple community pools with members who do not always share the same beliefs. In addition, the study reveals that the Guardian’s online consumption community co-creates value without strict adherence to the prescribed contingencies set out in current literature. The findings uncover new patterns in community behaviour proving value to be created not just through their co-consumption but also through individual consumption.

Originality/value

This study contributes to discussions on how communities co-create value and how this differs with different article subjects (lifestyle and political and types of participants, both active and passive).

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Fayez AlShehri and Barrie Gunter

An online survey was conducted among 800 readers of Arab electronic newspapers resident in different parts of the world. The aim of the survey was to obtain baseline data…

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1482

Abstract

An online survey was conducted among 800 readers of Arab electronic newspapers resident in different parts of the world. The aim of the survey was to obtain baseline data about the readership for such newspapers, readers’ opinions about these publications, and antecedents of overall satisfaction with the services provided by these publications. Most readers of Arab online newspapers were male, students, professionals or business persons resident overseas, and were established, regular users of the Internet. For most, the Internet was regarded as an important news source and more than half the respondents claimed to read Arab online newspapers every day. Internet news was valued because it was readily available all the time, free of charge and provided a substitute for printed newspapers not available to them in their current location. The main problems were technical, linked to difficulty downloading or browsing content. The great majority (72 per cent) were satisfied with online newspapers. Frequency of reading electronic newspapers and overall satisfaction with online newspapers were predicted.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 54 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Bahiyah Omar, Hosam Al-Samarraie and Bianca Wright

News research scholars define immediacy as constant news updating, whereas scholars in other fields conceptualize it more broadly as meaning closeness. The present study…

Abstract

Purpose

News research scholars define immediacy as constant news updating, whereas scholars in other fields conceptualize it more broadly as meaning closeness. The present study explicates the concept of immediacy and proposes a multidimensional notion of news immediacy that reflects physical and psychological closeness to the news.

Design/methodology/approach

A scale for measuring multifaceted immediacy was developed and tested in a between-subjects design experiment. Four dimensions were extracted from the analysis: transportation, involvement, vividness and timeliness.

Findings

The results reveal greater immediacy in online than print news contexts. Involvement is key to the experience of immediacy in both contexts; yet the feeling of being transported to the places of the news events was stronger among online than print news users. The latter relied more on vividness of the news presentation to attain closeness to the news.

Originality/value

Implications of the study were discussed.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2018

Lisa M. Graziano

The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the literature examining the role of news media consumption and awareness in shaping public attitudes about police.

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1284

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the literature examining the role of news media consumption and awareness in shaping public attitudes about police.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive, systematic search of multiple academic databases (e.g. EBSCO Host) was undertaken, supplemented by the use of Google Scholar to search among journals indicated as having cited the articles found in the databases.

Findings

A total of 42 studies were identified that met the selection criteria for this meta-review and examined exposure to high-profile incidents involving police, awareness of negative news coverage of police, and/or consumption of specific news mediums (e.g. newspapers). Overall, research supports a relationship between negative perceptions of police and both exposure to high-profile incidents and awareness of negative coverage. Some support for the influence of consuming television news on attitudes exists, but more research is needed on the role of different news sources in shaping perceptions. Future research should also include determining causal pathways and how news about police is selected.

Originality/value

This is the first meta-review of the research examining how news media and attitudes about police are related. This study will provide a useful resource for those researchers wishing to continue to examine different aspects of news media consumption as a predictor of perceptions.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2021

Husna Sarirah Husin, James Thom and Xiuzhen Zhang

The purpose of the study is to use web serer logs in analyzing the changes of user behavior in reading online news, in terms of desktop and mobile users. Advances in…

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40

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to use web serer logs in analyzing the changes of user behavior in reading online news, in terms of desktop and mobile users. Advances in mobile technology and social media have paved the way for online news consumption to evolve. There is an absence of research into the changes of user behavior in terms of desktop versus mobile users, particularly by analyzing the server logs.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors investigate the evolution of user behavior using logs from the Malaysian newspaper Berita Harian Online in April 2012 and April 2017. Web usage mining techniques were used for pre-processing the logs and identifying user sessions. A Markov model is used to analyze navigation flows, and association rule mining is used to analyze user behavior within sessions.

Findings

It was found that page accesses have increased tremendously, particularly from Android phones, and about half of the requests in 2017 are referred from Facebook. Navigation flow between the main page, articles and section pages has changed from 2012 to 2017; while most users started navigation with the main page in 2012, readers often started with an article in 2017. Based on association rules, National and Sports are the most frequent section pages in 2012 and 2017 for desktop and mobile. However, based on the lift and conviction, these two sections are not read together in the same session as frequently as might be expected. Other less popular items have higher probability of being read together in a session.

Research limitations/implications

The localized data set is from Berita Harian Online; although unique to this particular newspaper, the findings and the methodology for investigating user behavior can be applied to other online news. On another note, the data set could be extended to be more than a month. Although initially data for the year 2012 was collected, unfortunately only the data for April 2012 is complete. Other months have missing days. Therefore, to make an impartial comparison for the evolution of user behavior in five years, the Web server logs for April 2017 were used.

Originality/value

The user behavior in 2012 and 2017 was compared using association rules and Markov flow. Different from existing studies analyzing online newspaper Web server logs, this paper uniquely investigates changes in user behavior as a result of mobile phones becoming a mainstream technology for accessing the Web.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Lynn Sudbury and Peter Simcock

The purpose of this study is to provide a multivariate segmentation model of the older consumer market, utilising variables based on the major dimensions of ageing, and…

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6835

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide a multivariate segmentation model of the older consumer market, utilising variables based on the major dimensions of ageing, and behavioural variables previously shown to be pertinent to older adults in the gerontology and marketing literature.

Design/methodology/approach

A self‐complete questionnaire was administered to an age‐based quota sample of 650 older consumers (aged 50‐79) in the UK. Using the age and consumer behaviour variables, cluster analysis was performed. The clusters were then profiled using ANOVA, Kruskal‐Wallis and χ2 techniques, using those variables not included in the initial analysis.

Findings

The results confirmed that the older consumer market is not homogeneous. Rather, five distinct segments emerged which differ considerably from one another on a range of variables, including consumer behaviours.

Practical implications

The model has practical implications for targeting older consumers, and the paper provides guidelines on how to reach the different segments.

Originality/value

The paper, the result of the largest known empirical study into older consumers in the UK, provides a comprehensive segmentation model that overcomes many of the limitations of previous segmentation studies pertaining to older adults. It also fills a research gap noted by several previous researchers in that a variety of different types of age are utilised.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Maria Jose Hernandez Serrano, Anita Greenhill and Gary Graham

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework to understand the influence that the social era is having on the value chain of the local news industry. The…

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1626

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework to understand the influence that the social era is having on the value chain of the local news industry. The authors theoretically advance value chain theory by, firstly, considering the influence of community type and age on consumption and, secondly, exploring the role that consumers can play in value-adding activities. The theoretical contribution of this study lies in moving from a transactional approach towards consumer relationships in the value chain towards managing consumers as a source of relational value (e.g. co-creation and integrated perspectives).

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual framework is theoretically positioned in relation to community and digital community practices in the social era. A series of research questions are presented, then these questions are explored drawing on empirical data from the Pew database. The authors then advance the framework further to consider news firm strategy towards its consumers. Fifteen in-depth executive interviews were conducted with local news organizations in the Manchester area of the UK.

Findings

The authors illustrate that different types of communities (merging cohorts and locations) are influencing levels of technological and social connectivity within the value chain. The authors also found that the news industry is experimenting with reconfiguring its consumer relations from a purely transactional to a co-created and participatory value-added activity in the social era. In terms of its policy impact, the findings in this paper show that the whole strategic value chain ideology of the news industry needs to change radically; away from its largely transactional (and lack of trust) approach in the ability of consumers to create value in the supply chain (other than to buy a product) and, move towards much greater consumer involvement and participation in value chain processes (creation, production and distribution of news products and services).

Originality/value

The change associated with social media and connectivity is changing the way that different community types and consumer groups are now consuming and participating in news content creation. Unlike previous studies, the authors show that there is variance and complexity in the levels of consumer participation by community type/age group. Using the Pew data, the authors contribute to knowledge on the value creation strategy of news firms in the social era, by identifying how communicative, social and communicative logics influence value and co-creation activities in the local news supply chain. Through interviews, the authors advance value co-creation theory from its strategic and marketing origins to operational and supply chain implementation.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Hyun Jeong Min

During the 1920s and 1930s in the colonial city of Seoul, a group of women called the New Women and the Modern Girls expressed their modern identities by wearing different…

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1101

Abstract

Purpose

During the 1920s and 1930s in the colonial city of Seoul, a group of women called the New Women and the Modern Girls expressed their modern identities by wearing different clothing, hairstyles and make-up; visiting cafés; viewing Western movies; and consuming other foreign merchandise. While these women were admired by many women as being pioneers of modernity, they were severely criticized by others under the pretext that they indulged their vanity without considering the economy of their families and their colonized nation. These criticisms continue in twenty-first century Korea. Based on the striking similarity between the two eras, an understanding of the consumption and the criticisms of the Modern Girls could provide a historical context for understanding women's experiences in the consumer culture of twenty-first century Korea. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

As secondary sources, literature published in both English and Korean was included. Primary data were obtained from articles in Korean newspapers, magazines and print advertisements from the 1920s and 1930s.

Findings

The New Women and Modern Girls expressed their modern identities by consuming various fashion goods, including Western-style clothes, make-up and various accessories, adopting Western hairstyles and frequenting modern cafés, theaters and department stores. However, their behaviors escaped the boundaries of the “wise mother, good wife” ideology, and they were severely criticized by those adhering to the neo-Confucianism and Korean nationalist ideology that was deeply rooted in Korean society. Thus, the reputations of the Modern Girls were tainted and the individuals were stigmatized.

Originality/value

This research illuminates the negative aspects of self-expressive consumption, showing how individualistic, identity-driven consumption can be stigmatized in the collectivistic culture of Korea that is rooted in neo-Confucian nationalism.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2007

Soraya W. Assad

The emergence of consumer‐oriented societies has become the central trait of our era. Saudi Arabia gained entrée to consumerism via its oil wealth. Numerous studies…

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2679

Abstract

Purpose

The emergence of consumer‐oriented societies has become the central trait of our era. Saudi Arabia gained entrée to consumerism via its oil wealth. Numerous studies demonstrate that consumer lifestyle and consumerist attitudes are spreading in the country. The purpose of this study is to explain how Saudi Arabia came to be a consumer society, to present evidence of rampant consumption, and to describe how global and local economic, social, and governmental factors colluded to reinforce this cultural trend.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on the survey and analysis of secondary data gathered from published studies and reports available in English and in Arabic.

Findings

The study shows that the spread of consumerism in Saudi Arabia is a consequence of a complex of global and local factors. Commercial television and the internet, marketing strategies, relentless and manipulative advertising, urbanization, and proliferating shopping centers, are all components of globalization promoting emulation of the Western consumerism lifestyle. The national government subsidies and give‐aways during the oil boom years due to increased national income, absence of taxes, public job availability, emerging middle class, liberal import policies, increased female participation in family purchase decisions, a burgeoning youth market, and increased per capita income have also enabled Saudi Arabia's transformation into a consumer society. In addition, statistics presented for a variety of durable and nondurable goods and services amply testify to rampant Saudi consumerism.

Originality/value

Excessive consumption in Saudi Arabia is a threat to the social order. It is exacerbating economic, environmental, social, psychological, and health problems. As Saudi Arabia seeks sustainable development, more research is needed to identify and address problematic aspects of consumption. As part of this process, policy makers should distinguish what constitutes consumerism from healthy consumption patterns. Excessive consumption should be minimized as a way to avoid economic minefields and sustain economic growth.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2020

Attila Pohlmann and Qimei Chen

Biological sex is an important segmenting variable in marketing. Yet its ability to meaningfully distinguish beyond the female/male dichotomy is limited. With traditional…

Abstract

Purpose

Biological sex is an important segmenting variable in marketing. Yet its ability to meaningfully distinguish beyond the female/male dichotomy is limited. With traditional gender roles continuously shifting and contemporary fluid conceptualizations of gender altering the consumption mainstream, the diverse and multi-faceted behaviours related to gender elude market segment distinctions that are based on biological sex alone. Thus far, researchers have had only limited success applying the concept of gender identity and gender schema theory to inform marketing research and management. The purpose of this study is to further develop a consumer decision-oriented scale that addresses this gap by providing a more sensitive method of segmentation.

Design/methodology/approach

The scale was validated according to common psychological scale development techniques.

Findings

Not only does the Consumption Gender Scale predict the behaviours and media preferences of traditional, gender-schematic male and female consumer segments, but it also accounts for the variance in the behaviours of gender-aschematic non-traditional men and women. We demonstrate the scale’s predictive power in two experimental studies and discuss its potential to serve as an intermediary variable that can predict product attitudes and purchase intentions on social media.

Research limitations/implications

The Consumption Gender Scale was based on surveys and experiments conducted in the USA. Future research could examine the suitability of the scale in other cultural contexts.

Practical implications

The Consumption Gender Scale provides a finer taxonomy for organizations to use in segmenting their target market on the basis of consumption-relevant gender rather than biological sex. Consequently, it also provides opportunities for managers to fine-tune their media-planning efforts.

Originality/value

Biological sex as the main segmenting variable has become inadequate because of ongoing shifts in gender roles and changes in associated consumption behaviours. To address the shortcomings of traditional methods, we advocate for and validate a continuous measurement scale.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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