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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2019

Tingting Jiang, Qian Guo, Shunchang Chen and Jiaqi Yang

The headlines of online news are created carefully to influence audience news selection today. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between news

Abstract

Purpose

The headlines of online news are created carefully to influence audience news selection today. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between news headline presentation and users’ clicking behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Two types of unobtrusive data were collected and analyzed jointly for this purpose. A two-month server log file containing 39,990,200 clickstream records was obtained from an institutional news site. A clickstream data analysis was conducted at the footprint and movement levels, which extracted 98,016 clicks received by 7,120 headlines ever displayed on the homepage. Meanwhile, the presentation of these headlines was characterized from seven dimensions, i.e. position, format, text length, use of numbers, use of punctuation marks, recency and popularity, based on the layout and content crawled from the homepage.

Findings

This study identified a series of presentation characteristics that prompted users to click on the headlines, including placing them in the central T-shaped zones, using images, increasing text length properly for greater clarity, using visually distinctive punctuation marks, and providing recency and popularity indicators.

Originality/value

The findings have valuable implications for news providers in attracting clicks to their headlines. Also, the successful application of nonreactive methods has significant implications for future user studies in both information science and journalism.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 72 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2018

Lisa M. Graziano

The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the literature examining the role of news media consumption and awareness in shaping public attitudes about police.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the literature examining the role of news media consumption and awareness in shaping public attitudes about police.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive, systematic search of multiple academic databases (e.g. EBSCO Host) was undertaken, supplemented by the use of Google Scholar to search among journals indicated as having cited the articles found in the databases.

Findings

A total of 42 studies were identified that met the selection criteria for this meta-review and examined exposure to high-profile incidents involving police, awareness of negative news coverage of police, and/or consumption of specific news mediums (e.g. newspapers). Overall, research supports a relationship between negative perceptions of police and both exposure to high-profile incidents and awareness of negative coverage. Some support for the influence of consuming television news on attitudes exists, but more research is needed on the role of different news sources in shaping perceptions. Future research should also include determining causal pathways and how news about police is selected.

Originality/value

This is the first meta-review of the research examining how news media and attitudes about police are related. This study will provide a useful resource for those researchers wishing to continue to examine different aspects of news media consumption as a predictor of perceptions.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Steven Chermak

Public opinion and political ideology affect the way in which police departments formulate responses to crime. Examines how departments construct public images to ensure…

Abstract

Public opinion and political ideology affect the way in which police departments formulate responses to crime. Examines how departments construct public images to ensure favorable media presentation. Uses direct observation of news production process for more specific data on how police sources impact on crime‐news presentation. Finds that news media can hold police accountable to the public, but news media are also businesses and have to provide news that will attract consumers. News media rely on willing participants to produce crime stories cost‐effectively. Police look to the media to reaffirm their status as law enforcers; they invest resources in helping the media and thus influence crime presentation. Finds that police categorization of crime is self‐promoting and supportive of traditional responses, while reporters are not critical of police.

Details

American Journal of Police, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0735-8547

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Judith Moeller, Damian Trilling, Natali Helberger, Kristina Irion and Claes De Vreese

This paper aims to shed light on the impact of personalized news media on the shared issue agenda that provides democracies with a set of topics that structure the public…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to shed light on the impact of personalized news media on the shared issue agenda that provides democracies with a set of topics that structure the public debate. The advent of personalized news media that use smart algorithms to tailor the news offer to the user challenges the established way of setting the agenda of such a common core of issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper tests the effects of personalized news use on perceived importance of these issues in the common core. In particular, the authors study whether personalized news use leads to a concentration at the top of the issue agenda or to a more diverse issue agenda with a long tail of topics.

Findings

Based on a cross-sectional survey of a representative population sample (n = 1,556), we find that personalized news use does not lead to a small common core in which few topics are discussed extensively, yet there is a relationship between personalized news use and a preference for less discussed topics. This is a result of a specific user profile of personalized news users: younger, more educated news users are more interested in topics at the fringes of the common core and also make more use of personalized news offers.

Research limitations/implications

The results are discussed in the light of media diversity and recent advances in public sphere research.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the ongoing debate about algorithmic news dissemination. While, currently, much attention is reserved for the role of platforms as information gatekeepers in relationship to the news media, maybe their ability to enable or hinder the audience in discovering and distributing news content is part of what really characterizes their influence on the market place of ideas.

Details

info, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1834-7649

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

Sari Lehmuskallio

This paper aims to explore the decision‐making practices and processes related to gathering, selecting, and publishing of internal corporate news through intranets in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the decision‐making practices and processes related to gathering, selecting, and publishing of internal corporate news through intranets in large multinationals in Finland.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on eight semi‐structured interviews of intranet editors responsible for the corporate news on the intranet.

Findings

Intranet editors are the main corporate gatekeepers and agenda setters making news publication decisions; i.e. determining what is important and newsworthy. These editors make decisions independently rather than collectively, thus news gathering is greatly affected by the networking and organizational skills of the individual editors. Companies prefer neutral news. Honesty and openness are principles that justify also the publication of “bad news.”

Research limitations/implications

This study explored how intranet editors construct reality through shaping internal communication content. The study did not attempt to assess the effects or effectiveness of this communication. Similarly, although intranet's goals and purposes were assessed, the extent to which the intranet helps the company achieve its strategic goals was not analyzed in detail. Further, research is needed to explore these important issues.

Practical implications

This paper offers practical examples of how large multinationals convey internal news through intranets. It highlights aspects that may help companies improve intranet's strategic value by enhancing internal communication through the intranet.

Originality/value

This paper reveals the power of individual editors in constructing reality for the organization. It also offers practitioners, researchers, teachers, and students a rare view into the real‐life processes and practices related to communication via intranets that can rarely be accessed and evaluated by outsiders.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Fiona Campbell

Describes the work carried out at doctoral level which investigated the ways in which journalists construct environmental news in Scotland. Focuses on the methods and…

Abstract

Describes the work carried out at doctoral level which investigated the ways in which journalists construct environmental news in Scotland. Focuses on the methods and tacit rules which reporters employ to locate, select and retrieve information for news stories. Journalists retrieve information from a complex range of sources. Addresses the information sources which are used in the news process. Examines the preference for human sources as opposed to library‐based information and discusses the influence of pragmatic constraints like time and space on the production of news.

Details

New Library World, vol. 98 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 22 October 2020

Dimitrios Giomelakis and Andreas Veglis

The journalism profession has radically changed due to the digitisation and the development of new media. As content is moving online, rapidly evolving Internet…

Abstract

The journalism profession has radically changed due to the digitisation and the development of new media. As content is moving online, rapidly evolving Internet technologies have affected basic journalistic work processes. In this context, changes in technology as well as audience engagement have greatly expanded the skills required to be a professional journalist nowadays. A number of studies have shown that search engines constitute an important source of the traffic to online news outlets around the world, identifying the significance of top rankings in search results. Concurrently, in the digital age, the interest in monitoring online activities as well as the significance of studying the traffic data has intensified. This chapter summarises the major findings of two studies regarding the use and impact of SEO and web analytics on news websites and journalism profession in Greece. Through examination of a sample of Greek journalists and several Greek news websites, it aims to provide new insights in the field of digital journalism.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Digital Media in Greece
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-401-2

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2020

Joseph McAnulty

This study explores social studies preservice teacher’s orientation toward teaching news media literacy in the era of fake news. Previous literature indicates that many…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores social studies preservice teacher’s orientation toward teaching news media literacy in the era of fake news. Previous literature indicates that many social studies teachers express a desire to maintain neutrality in the classroom. As such, this study focuses on the preservice teachers’ articulated pedagogical practices around news media literacy, as well as the described forces and factors that influence their described stances.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses work from the field of political communication to analyze course assignments, semi-structured interviews and survey responses in order to consider the ways 39 preservice social studies teachers articulated their anticipated and enacted pedagogical practices around news media literacy.

Findings

Findings suggest a prevalent desire among the participants to pursue neutrality by presenting “both sides,” echoing traditional journalistic pursuits of objectivity. The possible consequences of this desire are also explored. Additionally, the study suggests that parents, administrators and the content standards are viewed as forces, which will constrain their practices.

Practical implications

Using theorizing about the civil sphere, this paper considers implications for teacher educators. The civil sphere may provide a lens with which to analyze news media and may help preservice teachers adopt practices they view as risky.

Originality/value

This study aims to extend conversations around the teaching of news media, controversial political and social issues and the preparation of social studies teachers in the current social and political ecology by working to align the field with growing conversations in the field of political communication and journalism.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Marion A. van Lunenburg

In what way do Dutch newspapers report about large Dutch enterprises and to what extent are differences in media coverage caused by business‐related variables and/or media…

Abstract

In what way do Dutch newspapers report about large Dutch enterprises and to what extent are differences in media coverage caused by business‐related variables and/or media related variables? A content analysis of 2,354 articles from Dutch newspapers about 25 Dutch companies shows that companies differ in the way they are covered by newspapers. Both branch and number of employees have an effect on the volume of news. Publishing and transport companies show a higher volume than other branches. Also De Telegraaf, de Volkskrant and NRC Handelsblad show higher volumes than Algemeen Dagblad and Trouw. Stock value, change in share price and change in profit do not seem to have any effect on volume of news, although change in profit does have an effect on number of articles. A judgement score is also calculated for each article. Newspapers do not differ from each other in the way they cover companies. Only branch and change in profit show an effect on judgement score.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Khudejah Ali, Cong Li, Khawaja Zain-ul-abdin and Muhammad Adeel Zaffar

As the epidemic of online fake news is causing major concerns in contexts such as politics and public health, the current study aimed to elucidate the effect of certain…

Abstract

Purpose

As the epidemic of online fake news is causing major concerns in contexts such as politics and public health, the current study aimed to elucidate the effect of certain “heuristic cues,” or key contextual features, which may increase belief in the credibility and the subsequent sharing of online fake news.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a 2 (news veracity: real vs fake) × 2 (social endorsements: low Facebook “likes” vs high Facebook “likes”) between-subjects experimental design (N = 239).

Findings

The analysis revealed that a high number of Facebook “likes” accompanying fake news increased the perceived credibility of the material compared to a low number of “likes.” In addition, the mediation results indicated that increased perceptions of news credibility may create a situation in which readers feel that it is necessary to cognitively elaborate on the information present in the news, and this active processing finally leads to sharing.

Practical implications

The results from this study help explicate what drives increased belief and sharing of fake news and can aid in refining interventions aimed at combating fake news for both communities and organizations.

Originality/value

The current study expands upon existing literature, linking the use of social endorsements to perceived credibility of fake news and information, and sheds light on the causal mechanisms through which people make the decision to share news articles on social media.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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