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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Lutz Preuss and Ralf Barkemeyer

Against the backcloth of a growing geopolitical and economic importance of emerging economies, this paper seeks to ask whether emerging economy firms are willing to match

Abstract

Purpose

Against the backcloth of a growing geopolitical and economic importance of emerging economies, this paper seeks to ask whether emerging economy firms are willing to match their increased economic weight with greater social responsibility. Given a relative scarcity of research into CSR in Russia, particular attention is to be given to firms from that country.

Design/methodology/approach

The research question is examined through an analysis of differences between firms from industrialized nations, transition economies, and newly industrialized countries in terms of the breadth and depth of their sustainability reporting. This three‐way comparison analyses corporate sustainability reporting according to the GRI G3 framework developed by the Global Reporting Initiative.

Findings

The firms in the sample display clear evidence of a divide between industrialized and emerging economies, with Russia occupying a middle position. Contrary to expectations, however, emerging economy firms outperform those from industrialized nations in their coverage of GRI indicators.

Research limitations/implications

These findings leave open two possible conclusions: either emerging economy MNEs have leaped to the front in terms of addressing sustainability or they have been able to use GRI reporting as window‐dressing to hide a dirtier reality. From a different angle, the strong evidence of a North‐South divide in the sample also lends support to the national business systems approach to CSR.

Originality/value

The paper adds to a small but growing body of cross‐national studies into CSR that go beyond OECD member countries. In particular, it constitutes one of the first studies not only to tease out CSR priorities of large Russian firms but also to elucidate differences in terms of CSR priorities between newly industrialized countries and transition economies.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2007

Charles Blankson, Julian Ming‐Sung Cheng and Nancy Spears

The aim of this paper is to investigate bank choice/selection criteria in a range of cultural and country economic scenarios. More specifically, the purpose of this study…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate bank choice/selection criteria in a range of cultural and country economic scenarios. More specifically, the purpose of this study is to understand international consumers' selection criteria of banks using the USA, Taiwan, and Ghana as illustrations.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a literature review, the paper adopts the classical multi‐step scale development process which demanded that thorough attention be paid to every step of the process. The study employed exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to assess the reliability of the results.

Findings

The study reveals three key dimensions/factors/strategies that are consistent across all three economies. The paper concludes that open and liberalized business climate appear to explain consumers' decisions.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on the college student cohort and thus the results do not represent the public. This poses generalizability questions without further replications and validations. This study did not examine whether there were consumers' switching behaviors involving banks.

Practical implications

Insights derived from this study will provide bank managers and advertising executives with the building blocks for understanding consumers' choice criteria of banks in industrialized, newly industrialized and liberalized developing economies.

Originality/value

A comprehensive validated scale measuring international consumers' selection of banks is proposed. In view of the scarce stream of empirical studies dealing with consumers' selection of banks in liberalized developing nations, this research comes at an opportune time, as several governments in these economies are encouraging bank savings, channeling college students' loans through bank accounts and proactively attracting global banks to establish branches in their countries. This study complements the extant literature dealing with consumers' selection of banks. Finally, a cross‐national and cross‐cultural dataset of consumers' choice criteria of banks have been put forward that would enhance further appreciation of the subject of banks selection in varying economies.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2014

Filip De Beule, Danny Van Den Bulcke and Haiyan Zhang

To analyze the industrial development of South, East, and Southeast Asian nations in terms of investment and trade and how the institutional environment – in particular…

Abstract

Purpose

To analyze the industrial development of South, East, and Southeast Asian nations in terms of investment and trade and how the institutional environment – in particular, the government policy with regard to outward foreign direct investment (OFDI) – has played a role in this respect.

Methodology/approach

The chapter puts OFDI policy and industrial upgrading in newly industrialized, emerging, and developing Asian economies (NIEDAEs) in historical perspective to attempt to draw inference from their past behavior.

Findings

The chapter provides information about each NIEDAE’s experience with OFDI policy through a comparative analysis of OFDI promotional policy.

Practical implications

A useful source of information about each NIEDAE’s OFDI policy approach, the chapter attempts to draw recommendations for OFDI policy.

Originality/value

This chapter fulfills an information need and offers practical help to government policy makers.

Details

Multinational Enterprises, Markets and Institutional Diversity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-421-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

T.F. Burgess, H.K. Gules, J.N.D. Gupta and M. Tekin

The topic of competitive priorities has attracted many of those interested in manufacturing strategy and stimulated a number of surveys in manufacturing industry. Much of…

Abstract

The topic of competitive priorities has attracted many of those interested in manufacturing strategy and stimulated a number of surveys in manufacturing industry. Much of this empirical work concentrates on large companies in industrialised economies while asserting the general applicability of findings. In contrast the survey reported here was conducted in a newly industrialising country, Turkey, focusing on small to medium‐sized manufacturing enterprises. Key personnel in 41 companies were questioned about the priorities of cost, quality, flexibility and, in particular, time. Process innovations, since these enable improvements in competitive priorities, were also examined. General similarities were evident between the Turkish, other European, and US situations. However, certain elements of quality and time were not ranked as highly in Turkey and the adoption levels of process innovations were lower. In contrast to US data, connections between competitiveness and time‐related performance measures were not apparent. Conclusions were drawn that Turkish manufacturing industry was generally at an earlier, quality‐dependent, stage in developing competitiveness and that time‐based competition was not yet evident.

Details

Benchmarking for Quality Management & Technology, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1351-3036

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Emmanuel Anoruo, Sanjay Ramchander and Harold Thiewes

The degree of integration among different economies is an important issue in international economics and finance. This article employs daily stock market data for the…

Abstract

The degree of integration among different economies is an important issue in international economics and finance. This article employs daily stock market data for the period 1988 through 1999 to investigate the return dynamics and the extent of the stock market linkages across six newly industrialized countries (NIC’s) of Asia, and documents the role of Japan and the US in this region. Primarily, the study finds that there are significant stock market linkages among the emerging equity markets of Hong Kong, India, Korea, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand. While dominant relationships do exist, no country is totally insulated from market movements that emanate from other countries in the region. Furthermore, the study documents the presence of temporal instability in the transmission mechanism that coincides with the Asian economic crisis. During the period in which the NIC’s experienced rapidly rising stock valuations, Singapore and the US had dominant causal influences on these Asian markets. However, in the period of financial crisis during the latter part of the 1990s decade, Singapore’s influence is greatly diminished while shocks from other countries, most notably India, play a more dominant role. Several important policy implications are derived from the results.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2007

Daniel I. Prajogo, Tritos Laosirihongthong, Amrik Sohal and Sakun Boon‐itt

The purpose of this paper is to present a comparative study on the impact of manufacturing strategies and resources on innovation performance in two newly industrialised

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a comparative study on the impact of manufacturing strategies and resources on innovation performance in two newly industrialised countries in the South East Asian region, Thailand and Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach was employed. The survey data was drawn from 95 Thai and 44 Vietnamese middle or senior managers in manufacturing firms.

Findings

Three major findings were noted in this study. First, there were no significant differences between Thai and Vietnamese manufacturing firms with respect to manufacturing strategies, resources, and innovation performance. Second, differentiation strategy is shown to be the strongest predictors for both product and process innovation across both countries. Technology management, however, only shows a significant effect on both product and process innovation among Thai firms. The other three manufacturing strategies (leadership, people management, and R&D) did not show a significant relationship with any of product or process innovations. Finally, the results of the moderating regression analysis, using country as a dummy variable, confirm that the effect of technology on product innovation is significantly stronger among Thai firms than Vietnamese firms.

Research limitations/implications

Small sample sizes of both countries are the major limitation of the study. Future studies can advance this research by incorporating a larger sample size as well as focusing on more innovative industries, such as electronics, automotive and food industries.

Practical implications

The results provide insights on the status of several key managerial practices among manufacturing firms in Thailand and Vietnam. The study highlights the lack of R&D intensity in manufacturing firms as well as its non‐significant impact on innovation performance.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study to compare two newly industrialised countries in the South East Asian region in regards to manufacturing/operational practices, innovation performances, and differentiation strategy.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 107 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2009

M. Dutta

The introduction of the 22 member countries of the 4+10+2+6 model of the Asian economy is the immediate task. Japan, Korea, China, India, Indonesia, the Philippines…

Abstract

The introduction of the 22 member countries of the 4+10+2+6 model of the Asian economy is the immediate task. Japan, Korea, China, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, Brunei Darussalam, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Myanmar constitute the now-famous 4+10 model. Following the principle of inclusion, Mongolia, Chinese Taipei, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Nepal, Pakistan, the Maldives, and Sri Lanka, as they belong to the regional map of the continent of Asia, are the eight remaining member countries (see Chapter 1). An overview of Asia's 22 member continental economy the AE-22, with its 3.6 billion people (2006) who have made the region of Asia their home in a land area of 20.5 million km2 should be welcome. To put these figures in perspective, the AE-22 comprises only 13.7 percent of the world's land area, but is home to over half the world's population. Tables 2.1–2.4, presented below, illustrate the various figures relating to population, land area, GDP, and GDP per capita of the member nations of the AE-22.

Details

The Asian Economy and Asian Money
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-261-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1992

Sin‐Hoon Hum and Lay‐Hong Leow

Seeks to contribute to the empirical database on the progression ofthinking with regards to the strategic role of manufacturing byreporting some results of a study on the…

Abstract

Seeks to contribute to the empirical database on the progression of thinking with regards to the strategic role of manufacturing by reporting some results of a study on the manufacturing‐strategy thinking and practices amongst practising managers of operations based in a newly industrialized economy (NIE). In particular, highlights the finding that while almost all operations managers in the sample perceive that manufacturing can and should contribute to overall corporate strategy, their view of the role of manufacturing is that it should primarily be reactive vis‐à‐vis other functional areas; such a view is far from strategic. Operations managers in the survey agree that there are many ways to compete besides cost, but their main criterion for evaluating the manufacturing function is still cost and productivity. They seem to fail to recognize the existence of tradeoffs in the production system. They acknowledge the necessity to handle strategic issues, but still perceive infrastructural decisions as mere operational decisions. While the role of managers in NIEs is likely to be more cost focused rather than strategic in orientation, they need to be better and further exposed to the current concepts of manufacturing strategy thinking and development. In particular, a more proactive form of the strategic role of manufacturing could be pursued.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 12 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Byoungho Jin

The East Asian newly industrialized countries (from now on, Asian NIC) of Hong Kong, South Korea, and Taiwan have experienced decreasing export competitiveness due to rise…

Abstract

The East Asian newly industrialized countries (from now on, Asian NIC) of Hong Kong, South Korea, and Taiwan have experienced decreasing export competitiveness due to rise of labor costs. While cheap labor has been the main source of competitiveness of Asian NIC, it cannot be a viable factor for Asian NIC any more. As the industry sector develops, its competitive advantage factors should be changed accordingly. This study is a preliminary attempt to illustrate how apparel industries in Asian NIC can obtain competitive advantage in the global economy and to suggest their future direction and challenges. By synthesizing industry‐specific and Asian NIC‐specific advantages, this study presents three critical factors for Asian NIC: global brand, global sourcing, and agility. Future directions and challenges for the industries are suggested.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Sowmya Dhanaraj, Arun Kumar Gopalaswamy and Suresh Babu M

The purpose of this paper is to examine the short‐term stock market interactions between US and six major Asian markets – China, India, Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the short‐term stock market interactions between US and six major Asian markets – China, India, Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan. These six economies along with Japan and Australia have the largest stock exchanges in the Asia‐Pacific region. The importance of the US market to the Asian economies is the prime motivation for a quantitative assessment of its role in this region. The objective of this study is to measure the dynamic stock market interdependence of US and Asian newly industrialized economies (NIEs) (Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan) and emerging market economies (EMEs) (China and India) post Asian crisis of 1997 and also to capture the market interactions during the sub‐prime crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The study has employed Granger causality tests and generalized forecast error variance decomposition (FEVD) analysis to analyze the fluctuations in and the extent of short‐term interdependence between the US and Asian economies. VAR model was estimated to run the simulations for FEVD analysis.

Findings

The empirical results from FEVD analysis revealed the dominance of US stock market on Asian markets; the USA being a large economy of the world, an important trading partner and major supplier of capital to Asian region. Stock markets of Asia are not immune to the shocks originating in the USA although the effects of shocks vary considerably across markets. Further, an important implication is that major crisis events can influence the relationship among stock markets.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers in the Asian context examining the interdependence with the US markets. Hence, even though most of the Asian economies went through liberalization, the macroeconomic and financial circumstances were very different before, after and during the process. This motivated the examination of the interactions between US and other Asian markets.

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