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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Natalie Martinez

Indigenous education in New Mexico has a long and disappointing history, but with current movements in the reformation of a more equitable system, there is hope for a…

Abstract

Indigenous education in New Mexico has a long and disappointing history, but with current movements in the reformation of a more equitable system, there is hope for a constitutionally sound and appropriate education for New Mexico's students. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a historical overview of the New Mexico Indian Education Act of 2003 and examine the scope of this state legislation in the 2018 court decision in Yazzie/Martinez vs. the State of New Mexico. This court ruling has directly affected schools and students in New Mexico. Specifically, there are legal and operational ramifications to school districts and implications for curricular and classroom decisions that address inequities in public education for vulnerable student populations. To provide context, I share my testimony as a witness in the legal proceedings. I also argue that curricular development opportunities in critical literacy and critical awareness for education practitioners will prove to be important responses to the findings of the lawsuit. I share findings from qualitative research on the implementation of the New Mexico Indian Education Act prior to the Yazzie/Martinez lawsuit and the resulting changes to the legislation resulting from the court findings.

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Rebecca M. Sánchez

This chapter describes a teacher education initiative for in-service teachers from around the United States focused on engagement with historical sites in New Mexico. The…

Abstract

This chapter describes a teacher education initiative for in-service teachers from around the United States focused on engagement with historical sites in New Mexico. The initiative invited professional educators to reconceptualize and “re-read” the history of the United States by studying the history of culture of Santa Fe and surrounding communities. This chapter will include an overview of place-conscious education. Additionally, it will advance three place orientations that are rooted in New Mexico history and culture: querencia, contested homelands, and sites as layered, storied texts. The chapter will also include an overview of the history of New Mexico that informed the professional development including a description of three historic sites that exemplify New Mexico's place orientations. Finally, the chapter will discuss qualities of the professional development experience itself with key insights gained from the participants around the place orientations identified in the chapter.

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

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Luminous Literacies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-452-3

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

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Luminous Literacies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-452-3

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Understanding the Mexican Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-066-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Karen Watkins

Information technology in New Mexico has not yet become an integral part of education, government, or library functions. In recent years, however, diverse local and…

Abstract

Information technology in New Mexico has not yet become an integral part of education, government, or library functions. In recent years, however, diverse local and regional efforts have started to come together, and significant planning and implementation activities are being undertaken, funded by the state as well as local and regional entities. With all connectivity initiatives, there is a focus on partnerships and a concern about shared infrastructure. Libraries have taken the path of host‐to‐host connectivity instead of developing a centralized system with a statewide catalog supported by mainframe. Statewide library networking has been and continues to be largely based on local initiatives.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Elijah Jacob Kosse, Stephen Devadoss and Jeff Luckstead

The purpose of this paper is to provide a historical background of the tomato dispute, review the USA trade law and its effect on the tomato trade, discuss the role of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a historical background of the tomato dispute, review the USA trade law and its effect on the tomato trade, discuss the role of the North American Free Trade Agreement and other supply and demand factors on increased tomato imports from Mexico and present a conceptual analysis of the effects of a Suspension Agreement (a form of Voluntary Export Restraint) on the USA and Mexico. In 1996, the USA and Mexico signed the Suspension Agreement which sets a guaranteed minimum price for Mexican tomato imports.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual analysis graphically illustrates how the Suspension Agreement affects the tomato trade for the USA and Mexico and shows the benefits and losses of consumers and producers in these two countries.

Findings

There is no consensus regarding whether Mexico dumps tomatoes onto the US market. However, US trade law favors domestic producers, leading to the signing of the Suspension Agreement. It is shown here that this agreement has substantial welfare effects in both Mexico and the USA. While it was designed to protect US producers, it also aids Mexican consumers and may potentially improve Mexican producer surplus as well. Only US consumers unambiguously suffer a loss.

Research limitations/implications

As the theoretical model indicates, the Suspension Agreement’s minimum price does help Floridian farmers but, if the rents are large enough, may also aid Mexican producers. If Mexican producers do gain, then quota rent is shifted from tomato consumers to Mexican producers. On the other hand, US consumers are hurt as well as tomato processing plants because they purchase fresh tomatoes for use as inputs. The higher price minimum after the 2013 agreement will likely intensify the welfare effects, and the addition of different categories with distinct prices is likely to have additional consequences for both welfare and trade distortions.

Originality/value

As the USA and Mexico recently signed a new Suspension Agreement, this paper deals with a very timely and contentious trade dispute and contributes to the area of research international trade war. The literature on Suspension Agreements is also expanded by providing welfare analysis of both producers and consumers.

Details

Journal of International Trade Law and Policy, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-0024

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Ashley Nowikowski

This chapter looks at the presence of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, plus (LGBTQIA+) literacy practices in New Mexico schools, primarily…

Abstract

This chapter looks at the presence of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, plus (LGBTQIA+) literacy practices in New Mexico schools, primarily Albuquerque Public Schools. When finding rates of homelessness, suicide, and mental illness to be high in New Mexico, the author tackles the question of what teachers can do in their spaces to be inclusive and supportive. The author analyzes what is present and what is missing. Through citing organizations GLSEN, The Trevor Project, and Equality New Mexico, the author suggests minor and major ways to make change in elementary, middle, and high school classrooms. The suggestions include adding LGBTQIA+ history to the curriculum, creating safe spaces for preferred pronouns, and reading LGBTQIA+ literature and legislature.

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Book part
Publication date: 16 May 2013

Diane E. Davis and Onesimo Flores Dewey

Using the case of a failed airport project in metropolitan Mexico City, this chapter explores the political and economic reasons for urban megaproject failure. It examines…

Abstract

Using the case of a failed airport project in metropolitan Mexico City, this chapter explores the political and economic reasons for urban megaproject failure. It examines the nature of the oppositional alliances; the larger political, economic, institutional, and spatial conditions under which these alliances were forged; and how they forced project proponents to abandon a planned megaproject. In searching for the factors responsible for project failure, the study employs theories of political party competition, bureaucratic–institutional conflict, and social movements. It uses qualitative and historical analysis to focus attention on divisions within and between the political class and citizens driven by democratization, decentralization, and globalization. The case suggests that the historical and institutional legacies of urban and national development in Latin America have created bureaucratic ambiguities and tensions over who is most responsible for major infrastructure development in countries experiencing democratic transition. The failure to successfully build the Mexico City airport megaproject reflects a precarious transitional moment in the country's political and economic development as much as the validity of claims against the project itself. If planners can better situate megaproject development in the context of changing institutional relations between citizens and the state, they may be better able to find common ground.

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Understanding the Mexican Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-066-0

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