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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Holly Ferraro and Jennifer Marrone

The purpose of this paper is to examine the family business literature on human resource management (HRM) activities within family-owned businesses to advance theory and practice.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the family business literature on human resource management (HRM) activities within family-owned businesses to advance theory and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a review of research on the formation, adaptation, and termination of the employment relationship within family businesses.

Findings

Important areas for future research are revealed. For example, little research investigates how family members are recruited, socialized, or how exit decisions are made. In contrast, significant attention has been given to role transitions during succession.

Research limitations/implications

The paper focuses on managing employment relationships (e.g. recruitment, selection, etc.) within family businesses. The research revealed HRM activities within family businesses are often informal so aspects of the employment relationship may not be fully captured by extant research.

Practical implications

This review provides specific HRM suggestions for practitioners to consider. For example, this review highlights that training inside the family business can be as effective as training outside the family business.

Originality/value

This review is novel in applying an established HRM framework to family business research and focuses on HRM activities of family members as opposed to non-family employees. The paper offers considerations for families bringing next generation members into their businesses and preparing offspring to run them successfully.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Keanon Alderson

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature concerning the negative effects of conflict among family businesses and to make practitioner focussed recommendations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature concerning the negative effects of conflict among family businesses and to make practitioner focussed recommendations for the prevention, management, and resolution of conflict. This paper discusses the prevalence of conflict in family firms, differentiates the types of conflict present, and recommends proven approaches to prevent and manage the conflict, with a focus on corporate governance tools. Examples of well known companies are presented.

Design/methodology/approach

A review was conducted of the literature concerning family business conflict and corporate governance.

Findings

Conflict is a common problem in family firms that has significant consequences for the business and the family. Research has shown effective governance may reduce and manage conflict.

Research limitations/implications

This was a literature review. As such it did not perform original research.

Practical implications

This paper has practical implications for family business practitioners. The paper offers the negative aspects of conflict and recommends effective mechanisms such as governance tools to enable the prevention, management, and resolution of conflict.

Social implications

Implications exist for practitioners and policy makers in order to reduce conflict and increase the viability of family firms.

Originality/value

The scholarly literature has been reviewed and synthesized into distillation for family business owners.

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Lorna Collins, Barbara Murray and Ken McCracken

This paper is a conversation piece which highlights the ways in which succession planning in large company might be handled. The discussion focuses on Christopher Oughtred…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a conversation piece which highlights the ways in which succession planning in large company might be handled. The discussion focuses on Christopher Oughtred the former Chairman of William Jackson Food Group, one of the largest family businesses in the UK. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a conversation with a panel of leading family business experts and a family business owner. The paper presents latest thoughts on family business research, insights into a real family business succession project and reflections from a former Chairman on the succession process.

Findings

Findings highlight possible stages and requirements of a successful transition and succession plan. Also suggestions for areas of further research are presented.

Originality/value

The conversation recorded in this paper represents a rare opportunity to obtain reflections and insights on a succession process and how it was managed in a large family business. The conversation also highlights the kinds of challenges often experienced by family businesses during transition and succession. As a case study this is an exemplar of how succession might be planned.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2005

Ron Sanchez and Aimé Heene

Firms can (and often do) learn from each other. Benchmarking has become an accepted and increasingly widely practiced initiative for interfirm learning. Benchmarking…

Abstract

Firms can (and often do) learn from each other. Benchmarking has become an accepted and increasingly widely practiced initiative for interfirm learning. Benchmarking specific capabilities and processes in one firm against another can help both firms’ managers identify strategic gaps in their capabilities and processes. More detailed forms of benchmarking may even suggest specific ways in which capabilities and processes can be improved. However, extracting significant learning from benchmarking with another company – while not unnecessarily revealing important sources of competitive advantage – requires a careful, balanced approach to managing a benchmarking process. In their paper “Limitations and challenges of benchmarking: A competence-based perspective,” Jörg Freiling and Sybille Huth develop a competence-based framework for managing benchmarking. While agreeing with the important potential benefits that benchmarking can bring to competence building, the authors point out a number of threats to a firm that may arise in a benchmarking process. In particular, the authors suggest that careful attention be paid to managing isolating mechanisms during benchmarking. Isolating mechanisms may bring a benefit by protecting strategic capabilities and processes from unintended discovery and imitation by either firm, while at the same time obscuring intended observations of each firm’s capabilities and processes that may defeat the basic intent of the benchmarking exercise. Careful management of isolating mechanisms should help assure that both parties to a benchmarking process will successfully navigate the three crucial steps identified by the authors in an effective benchmarking process: recognition, assimilation, and exploitation of new “best practices.”

Details

Competence Perspectives on Managing Interfirm Interactions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-169-9

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Lorna Collins, Ken McCracken, Barbara Murray and Martin Stepek

This paper is the first in a regular series of articles in JFBM that will share “a conversation with” thought leaders who are active in the family business space. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is the first in a regular series of articles in JFBM that will share “a conversation with” thought leaders who are active in the family business space. The world of family business is, like many other arenas, constantly evolving and as the authors learn more about how and why families “do business” the approaches and tools for working with them also evolve. The purpose of this paper is to stimulate further new research in areas that practically affect family businesses and to “open the door” to practical insights that will excite researchers and provide impetus for new and exciting study. The specific purpose of this paper is to explore “what is strong governance.” There has been much interest in governance lately yet there is a tendency to treat governance in a formulaic way such that, at the moment, the notion that every family business must have a family council or a formal structure in order to be considered “effective” and “successful” predominates. The authors’ panel challenges and discusses this notion drawing on the experience and knowledge as family business advisors, consultants and owners.

Design/methodology/approach

The impetus for this particular conversation is a result of a brainstorming conversation that Lorna Collins and Barbara Murray held in February 2014 where they focussed on “how JFBM can encourage and stimulate researchers to engage in aspects of research that makes a difference to the family business in a practical way.” This paper reports a conversation between Barbara Murray (Barbara), Ken McCracken (Ken) and Martin Stepek (Martin), three leading lights in the UK family business advising space, all of whom have been involved in running or advising family businesses for more than three decades, held in August 2015. The conversation was held via telephone and lasted just over 60 minutes. Lorna Collins acted as moderator.

Findings

Strong governance is not just about instituting a “family council” or embedding formal governance mechanisms in a family business. Evolutionary adaption by family members usually prevails such that any mechanism is changed and adapted over time to suit and fit the needs of the family business. Many successful family businesses do not have recognized “formal” governance mechanisms but, it is contended, they are still highly successful and effective. Future areas of research in governance are also suggested.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the family business discourse because the debate it reports challenges the basic assumptions upon which much consulting and advisory practice is conducted. It also challenges the notion of “best practiceand what is “new best practiceand how is it that any “best practice” is determined to be “best.” Furthermore, the panel provides insights in to the “impact of family dynamics on governance” and “the impact of family dynamics on advisors.” The paper content is original in that it provides an authentic and timely narrative between active family business practitioners who are also scholars and owners.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Anghel N. Rugina

A long Introduction provides a composite methodological standard of 25 elements (concepts, theorems and basic relationships) which actually represent in analysis a system…

Abstract

A long Introduction provides a composite methodological standard of 25 elements (concepts, theorems and basic relationships) which actually represent in analysis a system of general stable equilibrium in economics and other social sciences. In practice, the same composite standard refers to a possible regime of a free, just and stable economy and society. This double composite scientific objective standard was used to examine the content of the Memorial Lectures presented by nine Laureates who received the Nobel Prize in Economics from 1969 to 1974. Specifically, the purpose was to see how much these lectures have contributed to the clarification and the solution of the major problems of our time.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2019

Matthias Thürer, Thomas Maschek, Lawrence Fredendall, Peter Gianiodis, Mark Stevenson and Jochen Deuse

The purpose of this paper is to show that Hoshin Kanri has the potential to integrate the operations strategy literature into a coherent structure. Hoshin Kanri’s planning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that Hoshin Kanri has the potential to integrate the operations strategy literature into a coherent structure. Hoshin Kanri’s planning process is typically described as a top-down cascading of goals, starting with the senior management’s goals and moving to the lowest organizational level. The authors argue that this misrepresents a firm’s actual cognitive processes in practice because it implies reasoning from the effects to the cause, and assumes a direct causal relationship between what the customer wants and what is realizable by the system.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is conceptual, based on abductive reasoning and the literature.

Findings

The actual strategic thought process executed in an organization consists of three iterative processes: (i) a translation process that derives the desired customer attributes from customer/stakeholder data, (ii) a process of causal inference that predicts realizable customer attributes from a possible system design and (iii) an integrative process of strategic choices whereby (i) and (ii) are aligned. Each element relies on different cognitive processes (logical relation, causal relation and choice).

Research limitations/implications

By aligning the thought and planning processes, the competing concepts of manufacturing strategy are integrated into a coherent structure.

Practical implications

Different techniques have to be applied for each of the three elements. As each element relies on different cognitive processes (logical relation, causal relation and choice), the use of unifying tools (e.g. in the form of matrices, as often presented in the literature) is inappropriate.

Originality/value

This is the first study to focus on the thought processes underpinning manufacturing strategy.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Anghel N. Rugina

The economic science is again in a crisis and a new solution prolegomena to any future study in economics, finance and other social sciences has just been published by the…

Abstract

The economic science is again in a crisis and a new solution prolegomena to any future study in economics, finance and other social sciences has just been published by the International Institute of Social Economics in care of the MCB University Press in England. The roots of the major financial and economic problems of our time lie in an open conflict between theory and practice. In the 1930s and before the conflict was between classical theory and given realities. In the 1990s the conflict appears between the now prevailing modern, Keynesian theory and the actual realities. In addition during the twentieth century a great argument developed between the two schools of thought, argument which is not yet settled. In one sentence, the prolegomena tried and was successful to solve the conflict between theory and practice and the big doctrinal dispute of the twentieth century. It was a struggle of research and observation over half a century between 1947 and 1997.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Gaye Pottinger

Property is a key resource for the delivery of public services and needs to be managed well. The previous Conservative government had a conviction that better value public…

Abstract

Property is a key resource for the delivery of public services and needs to be managed well. The previous Conservative government had a conviction that better value public services could be delivered by harnessing private sector expertise and, since the late 1980s, embarked on an unprecedented level of competitive tendering. This procurement method had extended to the appointment of property consultants, but the system encountered difficulties which research by the College of Estate Management (CEM) sought to explain. The research, undertaken in 1995 and 1996, involved interviews and major questionnaire surveys covering managers and property professionals in the public and private sectors, leading to recommendations about changes to practice and policy. This paper traces developments in local government, by comparison with central government, from before the advent of compulsory competitive tendering (CCT) for property services in April 1996 through to the latest changes proposed by the new Labour government after May 1997. It concludes that competition is an important management tool, but recommends greater flexibility in the way procurement is implemented.

Details

Property Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2011

Arun Madapusi and Grant Miles

The concept of “routines” is used to classify diverse enterprise application systems (EAS) into a framework. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the theoretical…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of “routines” is used to classify diverse enterprise application systems (EAS) into a framework. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the theoretical underpinnings and EAS falling into each of the framework quadrants. The framework provides a guideline for firms to meet their EAS‐organizational alignment challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

The EAS‐organizational alignment framework in this paper is developed through a synthesis of literature. The framework links EAS and organizational routines according to intra‐ and inter‐levels of organizational analysis and inflexible and flexible governance mechanisms.

Findings

The findings suggest that a fit between EAS routines and organizational routines leads to successful EAS deployments and hence improved business performance.

Research limitations/implications

The findings provide researchers with reasons to incorporate routines into existing research models to better explain EAS‐organizational alignment. The next step is to empirically validate the EAS‐organizational alignment framework.

Practical implications

Firms can gain an understanding of how EAS routines and organizational routines can be manipulated to positively influence EAS‐organizational alignment and hence increase business performance. Firms can use routines as strategic tools for adoption and successful deployment of EAS across their global operations.

Originality/value

The paper's findings provide a perspective, different from past research, on our understanding of EAS‐organizational alignment and offer valuable guidance for future research in this area.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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