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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

Jerel E. Slaughter and Edgar E. Kausel

In this chapter, we argue that despite the fact that empirical research on trait neuroticism has shown fairly weak relations between the broad neuroticism trait and…

Abstract

In this chapter, we argue that despite the fact that empirical research on trait neuroticism has shown fairly weak relations between the broad neuroticism trait and overall job performance, organizational research can benefit by increased attention to the neuroticism construct. This is because the influence of neuroticism on work behavior can be best understood by separating the more general neuroticism domain into its lower level facets. We discuss various conceptualizations of neuroticism and then review existing research on the relation between the facets of neuroticism and job performance. Next, we turn our attention to a theoretical framework that suggests that the relations between neuroticism facets and job performance outcomes are explained by the social, cognitive, and behavioral effects of having varying levels of neuroticism-based traits. In so doing, we not only focus on mediated relationships between facets of neuroticism and job performance dimensions but also recognize some important moderators, as well as some expected direct relations between the facets and job performance. Finally, we discuss implications for further conceptual development, offer some suggestions for testing the propositions, and discuss potential practical implications of finding support for this model.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-056-8

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Nikola Djurkovic, Darcy McCormack and Gian Casimir

To examine the role of neuroticism in the psychosomatic model of workplace bullying.

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Abstract

Purpose

To examine the role of neuroticism in the psychosomatic model of workplace bullying.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey approach was used in this research. Partial Least Squares analyses on data from 127 participants were used to determine whether the effects of bullying on negative affect are independent of, or are moderated by, neuroticism.

Findings

Revealed that neuroticism does not moderate the relationship between bullying and negative affect. Bullying and neuroticism were found to act independently on negative affect. The results supported the psychosomatic model of bullying.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations are the nature of the sample, the use of self‐report and cross‐sectional data. Future research could use a larger sample, include multi‐rater data, and a longitudinal research design.

Practical implications

Dealing effectively with bullying is a concern for individuals and organizations. The findings highlight the need for anti‐bullying policies. Management need to be trained in the prevention of bullying and in how to deal effectively with bullying. Victims should not be held accountable for the psychosomatic effects of bullying, the onus remains on managers and employers to prevent bullying from occurring.

Originality/value

This paper extends the psychosomatic model of workplace bullying by examining the role of neuroticism. The findings have both theoretical implications for researchers in increasing understanding of the psychosomatic model of bullying, and practical implications for managers in organizations in terms of developing strategies for countering workplace bullying and its effects.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Denisa Luta, Deborah M. Powell and Jeffrey R. Spence

Our study examined whether work engagement follows a predictable pattern over the course of the work week and the role of personality traits in shaping this pattern.

Abstract

Purpose

Our study examined whether work engagement follows a predictable pattern over the course of the work week and the role of personality traits in shaping this pattern.

Design/Methodology/Approach

We examined these questions with 131 employees from Canada and the United States who provided daily ratings of work engagement over the course of 10 work days.

Findings

Multilevel modeling revealed that employee engagement followed an inverted U-shaped curvilinear pattern from Monday to Friday, peaking midweek. Neuroticism moderated the change pattern of engagement across the work week, such that individuals with higher levels of neuroticism experienced lower and less stable levels of work engagement throughout the work week compared with individuals with lower levels of neuroticism. However, extroversion and conscientiousness did not moderate the change pattern of employee engagement.

Research Limitations/Implications

These results provide insight into the entrainment of work to the work week and how this entrainment is further affected by the personality trait neuroticism.

Practical Implications

Understanding the weekly pattern of work engagement will help leaders’ time work assignments, interventions, and training sessions to keep the levels of employee engagement high.

Originality/Value

Our study revealed novel predictors of within-person engagement: weekly entrainment and neuroticism.

Details

Emotions and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-202-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Sadia Jahanzeb, Tasneem Fatima and Dirk De Clercq

With a basis in affective events theory, this study aims to investigate the mediating role of anger in the relationship between employees’ exposure to workplace bullying…

Abstract

Purpose

With a basis in affective events theory, this study aims to investigate the mediating role of anger in the relationship between employees’ exposure to workplace bullying and their engagement in deviant behaviours, as well as the invigorating role of their neuroticism in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Three-wave, time-lagged data were collected from employees and their peers in a sample of Pakistani organizations.

Findings

Workplace bullying spurs interpersonal and organizational deviance because it prompts feelings of anger in employees. This mechanism is more prominent among employees with high levels of neuroticism.

Originality/value

This study reveals that the experience of anger is a key feature by which bullying behaviours steer employees towards counterproductive work behaviours, and this harmful process is more likely to escalate when employees’ personality makes them more vulnerable to emotional distress.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2018

Rasidah Arshad and Ida RosnitaI Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between workplace incivility and knowledge hiding, and role of personality disposition (neuroticism) in moderating…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between workplace incivility and knowledge hiding, and role of personality disposition (neuroticism) in moderating such relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 108 employees nested in 18 teams from private sectors via survey questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analysis and hierarchical regression models were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings show that the higher the level of workplace incivility experienced by the team members, the higher the tendency for them to hide knowledge and this relationship is moderated by neuroticism. Specifically, the relationship was found to be stronger for those employees high in neuroticism compared to those low in neuroticism.

Practical implications

The study offers important implication in term of knowledge hiding prevention or reduction. The behavior can be reduced by creating awareness among employees on the importance of civility at work via campaign, realistic job preview and leading by example. To manage the effect of neuroticism, managers need to identify those high in the trait and provide them with training on how to better regulate and manage negative emotions in the workplace.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the research on knowledge hiding behavior by advancing the understanding of organizational and personal factors that can influence knowledge hiding among employees working in team. It is the first to propose and empirically validate the predictive effect of workplace incivility on knowledge hiding. It also addresses the usefulness of examining personality disposition in understanding the relationship between workplace incivility and knowledge hiding behavior.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 January 2020

Xiaojun Li and Yoshiaki Takao

The purpose of this study is to examine the predictive effects of social context and its interaction effects with individual differences on job crafting behaviors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the predictive effects of social context and its interaction effects with individual differences on job crafting behaviors. Specially, this paper draws on the purposeful work behavior theory to outline how the four social characteristics (social support, interdependence, interaction outside the organization and feedback from others) and the moderation effects of neuroticism predict task crafting, relational crafting and cognitive crafting.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study examined four social characteristics as antecedents of job crafting behaviors. The moderating effects of neuroticism were explored as well. By conducting a three-wave survey, the authors received a sample of 253 full-time incumbents in Japan. The data analysis used multiple regressions by using R language. Correlational and moderated regression analyses were performed to test this study’s hypotheses.

Findings

Empirical analysis of this study’s data shows some initial support for the application of the purposeful work behaviors theory to job crafting. The findings indicate that all four social characteristics promoted particular job crafting behaviors. Neuroticism was a significant moderator for the relationships between social support, interaction outside the organization, feedback from others and relative job crafting dimensions. The current study extends existing models of job crafting.

Originality/value

The current study makes significant theoretical contributions for both work design and job crafting literature. The present framework enriches our understanding of job crafting by demonstrating a picture of a moderated model between social characteristics and job crafting by uncovering the moderator – neuroticism. This study’s findings also contribute to managerial practices. Managers should build a supportive context and provide interdependence, interactions outside the organization and interpersonal performance feedback. To motivate employees with different personalities, offering different social context is necessary.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 February 2022

Atif Bilal, Syed Harris Laeeque, Muhammad Ali Saeed and Mohsin Mumtaz

This study examines the effects of teacher-perpetrated sexual harassment on graduate students' academic and extracurricular performance using conservation of resources…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the effects of teacher-perpetrated sexual harassment on graduate students' academic and extracurricular performance using conservation of resources theory as a framework. Further, it looks into the moderating role of trait neuroticism on the indirect relationship between sexual harassment and student performance via emotional exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal data were collected in three waves from 218 Pakistani students over a period of three months during the fall 2019 semester. PROCESS Macro (v. 4) model 7 was used on SPSS (v. 21) to analyze the data for testing the moderated-mediation hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that as a source of toxic stress, teacher-perpetrated sexual harassment is negatively related to both academic performance and extracurricular performance, and that emotional exhaustion is a mediator in this inverse relationship. In addition, trait neuroticism strengthens the negative effect of teacher-to-student sexual harassment on student performance through emotional exhaustion.

Originality/value

This study addresses an unexplored moderated-mediation mechanism, and thus makes valuable contributions to education management research and practice. More specifically, it contributes by examining emotional exhaustion as a mediating variable in the relationship of teacher-perpetrated sexual harassment and student performance and, perhaps for the first time, establishes the moderating role of neuroticism in increasing the strength of the aforementioned relationship.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2019

Andreas Oehler, Florian Wedlich, Stefan Wendt and Matthias Horn

The purpose of this study is to analyze whether differences in market-wide levels of investor personality influence experimental asset market outcomes in terms of limit…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze whether differences in market-wide levels of investor personality influence experimental asset market outcomes in terms of limit orders, price levels and price bubbles.

Design/methodology/approach

Investor personality is determined by a questionnaire. These data are combined with data from 17 experimental asset markets. Two approaches are used to estimate market-wide levels of investor personality. First, the market-wide average of each personality trait is determined; second, the percentage of individuals with comparable personality in a market is computed. Overall, 364 undergraduate business students participated in the questionnaire and the experimental asset markets.

Findings

Limits and transaction prices are higher in markets with higher mean values in participants’ extraversion and openness to experience and lower mean values in participants’ agreeableness and neuroticism. In markets with lower mean values of subjects’ openness to experiences more overpriced transactions are observed. In markets with a higher proportion of extraverted subjects and a lower proportion of neurotic subjects higher limits and transaction prices are observed. Bubble phases last longer in markets with a higher proportion of extraverted and a lower proportion of neurotic subjects.

Originality/value

Overall, the findings suggest that market-wide personality levels influence market outcomes. As a consequence, market-wide levels of personality help to explain prices in auctions with limited number of participants. Additionally, studies that analyze the influence of subjects’ characteristics, including risk aversion, emotional states or overconfidence, on market outcomes should also consider personality traits as potential underlying factor.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Boonlert Watjatrakul

Individual differences and perceived values of technology have received much attention in technology adoption literature. However, there is a lack of understanding of…

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Abstract

Purpose

Individual differences and perceived values of technology have received much attention in technology adoption literature. However, there is a lack of understanding of their relationships and effects on online learning adoption. The study aims to investigate the effects of two important personality traits (i.e. openness to experience and neuroticism) and five perceived values (i.e. functional value, emotional value, social value, epistemic value and conditional value) on students’ intentions to adopt online learning.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research method was used to collect information from university students. A sample size of 285 was used for data analysis. Structural equation modeling analysis using analysis of moment structure software was used to examine the construct reliability and validity, the model-fit indices and the causal relationships between latent constructs in the proposed framework.

Findings

The results show that neuroticism and openness to experience affect students’ intentions to adopt online learning through five perceived values of online learning. Particularly, students who are open to experience pay more attention to the quality of online learning. Students who are more neurotic avoid stress from learning in a situation that they are not familiar with. In addition, students tend to adopt online learning when they perceive online learning fulfills their emotional and social needs. Further discussions of the findings and implications for theory and practice are provided.

Originality/value

The study extends knowledge and understanding of online learning adoption associated with individual personality and perception of online learning’s values. It proposed a new framework to examine the effects of neuroticism, openness to experience and perceived values on online learning adoption. Universities might use the study results to plan and implement their online learning programs that will be considered valuable for students who have different personality traits.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2020

Boonlert Watjatrakul

Personality traits and perceived value have been the focus for research in online learning adoption. However, there is a lack of understanding of how the effects of…

Abstract

Purpose

Personality traits and perceived value have been the focus for research in online learning adoption. However, there is a lack of understanding of how the effects of perceived value on online learning adoption vary according to the different personality traits and the levels of a personality trait. This study explores the moderating roles of the Big Five personality traits (i.e. neuroticism, extraversion, conscientiousness, openness to experience, and agreeableness) in the relationships between the perceived value (i.e. value for money, quality, emotional value, and social value) and intention to study online courses.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey questionnaire was used to collect data from university students. This study used the partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) method to measure the quality of the formative and reflective constructs and examine the moderating effects of the five personality traits in four models. The regression of intention to study online courses on the perceived value at the different levels of a personality trait was analyzed by the simple slope analysis approach.

Findings

The study found that particular personality traits moderate the relationships between the perceived value and intention to study online courses. Neuroticism and openness to experience have the moderating effects on the relationship between perceived value for money and intention to study online courses. Neuroticism is the only personality trait that moderates the effect of perceived emotional value on intention to study online courses. In addition, the different levels of a personality trait differentially moderate the effects of the perceived value on intention to study online courses.

Originality/value

This study is considered among the first research attempting to explore the moderating roles of the Big Five personality traits in the context of online learning adoption. It bridges the research gap in online learning literature and generalizes the impacts of perceived value on online learning adoption to the different personality traits and the levels of a personality trait. The results provide guidance for educational institutions to develop an effective online learning strategy by creating and communicating the right value propositions to the right group of students based on their personality traits.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 37 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

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