Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 December 2021

Oyindamola Abiola Ajayi and Tsietsi Mmutle

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the communication of corporate social responsibility (CSR) contributes towards a favourable corporate reputation. It explores…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the communication of corporate social responsibility (CSR) contributes towards a favourable corporate reputation. It explores the communication strategies and channels organisations deemed reputable by stakeholders use to achieve an effective CSR communication.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve this, a qualitative content analysis using the directed approach was conducted on the textual CSR communication materials of ten reputable organisations in South Africa based on the 2018 South Africa Reptrak survey.

Findings

Result showed that seven out of ten organisations use both self-serving and society-serving motive in their CSR communication, while the other 3 use only the society serving motive. The informing strategy was also more evident in the CSR communication materials than the interactive strategy. In terms of the communication channels, the study found that organisations mainly utilise controlled channels for CSR communication.

Originality/value

The literature reviewed and the findings of this study reveal a gap between the theory and practice of CSR communication. This drives the need for organisations to research and tailor CSR communication based on stakeholders' unique characteristics and preferences. The paper also contributes to improving the knowledge on the role different CSR communication strategies and channels play in CSR communication.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Content available
Case study
Publication date: 7 August 2020

Ravi Pillay and Caren Brenda Scheepers

The learning outcomes are as follows: identifying and prioritising of stakeholders’ needs during crises; gaining insight into applying contextual intelligence in leaders…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are as follows: identifying and prioritising of stakeholders’ needs during crises; gaining insight into applying contextual intelligence in leaders’ decision-making on philanthropic investments; and evaluating initiatives by differentiating between creating shared value and corporate social responsibility.

Case overview/synopsis

On 15 March 2020, Bruno Olierhoek, Chairman and MD, Nestlé East and Southern Africa considers his dilemma of where to focus his community support initiatives during COVID-19, which could reflect their company’s purpose of enhancing quality of life and contributing to a healthier future in their response to the crisis? Also, creating shared value (CSV) was in their DNA as a company, and they wanted to do more than philanthropic gestures; therefore, they had to decide carefully about leveraging their strategic partnerships in the relief effort. The case highlights existing community involvement projects, pre-COVID-19, which illustrate multi-stakeholder collaboration. These existing trust relationships and partnerships are then leveraged during the COVID-19 pandemic. The case highlights unintended consequences of Nestlé’s gesture of donating food products to the 5,000 frontline health-care workers for specific stakeholder groups, such as the positive emotional responses of Nestlé’s own employees. These events in the case relate to existing theoretical frameworks, such as corporate citizenship which elicits pro-organisational behaviour in stakeholder groups.

Complexity academic level

Postgraduate programmes MBA or MPhil.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS: 7 Management Science

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Edmund S. Muskie and Daniel J. Greenwald

Through the Nestle Coordination Center for Nutrition, Nestle set up a special Commission to monitor whether the company was following a marketing code for infant formula…

Abstract

Through the Nestle Coordination Center for Nutrition, Nestle set up a special Commission to monitor whether the company was following a marketing code for infant formula established by the World Health Organization. The formation of this Commission was a high‐risk innovative move on Nestle's part. The result has been that this Commission was instrumental in settling the controversy surrounding Nestle's marketing of the formula in Third World countries.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Kumba Jallow

This paper attempts to provide a critique of the Commitment to Africa report in an effort to understand how one large transnational corporation sees its role in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper attempts to provide a critique of the Commitment to Africa report in an effort to understand how one large transnational corporation sees its role in the continent and to explain its social responsibility and its approach to citizenship.

Design/methodology/approach

The critique analyses sections of the report by identifying the key messages contained therein and reflects on these in the light of other evidence and viewpoints. For instance: On what does Nestlé base its corporate citizenship? What contribution does Nestlé make to economic development in Africa? What wider social issues does Nestlé embrace? How does the report discharge Nestlé's accountability to its stakeholders?

Findings

The report prioritises economic development and indicates that this is the means of achieving poverty alleviation in Africa. There is some engagement with the Millennium Development Goals by the company, which indicates a philanthropic model of corporate social responsibility.

Research implications/limitations

The study is limited to one company but there are implications for other transnational companies as many of these produce reports in a similar vein. The research could therefore be replicated by examining further reports.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the knowledge on the relationship between corporate social responsibility and poverty alleviation. It also provides additional evidence on the role of transnational enterprises in globalisation processes.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Rafael D. Pagan

Infant formula manufacturers have faced a major international controversy concerning their products. Activists took issue with the way these manufacturers marketed infant…

Abstract

Infant formula manufacturers have faced a major international controversy concerning their products. Activists took issue with the way these manufacturers marketed infant formula in Third World countries. Because Nestle was one of the largest producers of infant formula, activists staged a worldwide boycott of all Nestle products. In years to come, the solution to the controversy will be seen as a landmark in the development of a more dynamic attitude by business toward the larger world around it.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

To view the access options for this content please click here
Case study
Publication date: 23 November 2016

Babulal Yadav and Abhinandan K. Jain

Trouble was brewing for Nestle in India with a lab test finding MSG in Maggi noodles, a product brand which had been adjudged ‘most powerful’ and ‘most trusted’ in…

Abstract

Trouble was brewing for Nestle in India with a lab test finding MSG in Maggi noodles, a product brand which had been adjudged ‘most powerful’ and ‘most trusted’ in India;it was being banned in different parts of the country. Paul Bulcke, CEO of Nestle SA, arrived in New Delhi to face the heat and take necessary damage control measures. The case challenges the participants to review the events leading to a total ban on all the nine variants of Maggi noodles imposed by FSSAI, the Indian Regulator, by Nestle India. It also challenges them to suggest ways of taking care of the business in future in India as well as its effects in other countries.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Stephen Graham Saunders

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate over time the ethical performance of a multinational foods company – Nestlé – operating in a highly dynamic, complex, and often…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate over time the ethical performance of a multinational foods company – Nestlé – operating in a highly dynamic, complex, and often ambiguous environment in a crisis torn Zimbabwe.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study applies an ethical performance evaluation (EPE) managerial framework to evaluate the actions of Nestlé Zimbabwe at various critical decision‐making time periods.

Findings

While consumer pressure groups and international rights activists in Europe condemned Nestlé's actions in Zimbabwe as unethical and unacceptable, this research found that by exploring the events over time (i.e. longitudinal research) as the context of the event (crisis in Zimbabwe) evolved, it was shown that Nestlé faced a major ethical dilemma; and may have acted ethically and indeed acceptably given the unfolding crisis in Zimbabwe.

Research limitations/implications

An EPE managerial framework is a useful tool to provide insight and knowledge of a particular event, however using the framework will not determine what is ethical or not. Evaluating ethical performance is always a value judgement and therefore the framework only offers insight and knowledge into the events over time, allowing the researcher or manager the opportunity to draw better, more informed, ethical decisions.

Practical implications

The case study provides an illustration of a dynamic approach that can be used by business managers to assess the ethical performance of a company.

Originality/value

The paper proposes that an ethical performance of a company needs to be evaluated over time as the context of the events evolves. The EPE managerial framework is adapted to emphasize the importance of evaluating the time and context parameters.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Subject area

Operations and Logistics.

Study level/applicability

Senior undergraduate students and postgraduate students specialising in agricultural economics/agribusiness/supply chain management and can also be used for executive training for supply chain managers and corporate social responsibility (CSR) managers of food companies.

Case overview

This case presents an industry leading company – Nestlé’s sustainable initiative in its dairy supply chain in China. The case begins with the background of China’s dairy industry, followed by an introduction of the case company. The case then moves on to the comparison of Nestlé’s fresh milk supply chain operation before and after 2008 and different approaches to help the dairy suppliers’ transformation. The focus is on Nestlé’s innovative industry collaboration platform, the Dairy Farming Institute.

Expected learning outcomes

This case allows students to explore the following theoretical frameworks: sustainable supply chain management; supply chain leadership, supply chain learning and supply chain structure. By analysing this case, students should be able to gain an understanding of how multinational corporations (MNCs) play a supply chain leadership role in supply chain learning of sustainable supply chain initiatives.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 9: Operations and Logistics.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Paul V. Broeckx and Robert Hooijberg

In this chapter we discuss the “Nestlé on the Move” program. The program focuses especially on the areas of leadership and people development and finding ways to better…

Abstract

In this chapter we discuss the “Nestlé on the Move” program. The program focuses especially on the areas of leadership and people development and finding ways to better align people with the organization, gain their insights, engage them cooperatively, and stimulate initiative.

Details

Being There Even When You Are Not
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-6-6110-4908-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Beat Hans Wafler and Yuosre F. Badir

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how two multinational companies (MNCs) faced the challenge of market uncertainty and political instability in a newly emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how two multinational companies (MNCs) faced the challenge of market uncertainty and political instability in a newly emerging market, and how it affected the impact of their product marketing strategy (PMS) and product (brand) performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative longitudinal paired case study of a market entry by two global MNCs. Twelve global brands (products) were studied, which were locally manufactured and launched by the two MNCs during their first ten years of operation in Vietnam.

Findings

The authors approached the investigation from a conventional point of view: standardization versus adaptation. The results showed that in addition to these two traditional processes, a third one was also operating, which the authors labeled semi-adaptation, or the midway PMS. Semi-adaptation refers to a product that has been introduced to Vietnam from a neighboring country.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on two European MNCs active in the food and consumer-household goods industry in a newly emerging market: Vietnam.

Practical implications

This primary data indicate that the product standardization, semi-adaptation and adaptation process in practice is a technique applied to fit a product to a newly emerging market more by degree of change than by product category.

Originality/value

This paper supports a recent stream of research, which views Standardization or Adaptation as the two ends of the same continuum, where the degree of the firm’s PMS can range between them.

1 – 10 of over 2000