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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2019

Merlin Stone, Neil Woodcock, Yuksel Ekinci, Eleni Aravopoulou and Brett David Parnell

This paper aims to review the development of thinking about the information needed by companies to create an accurate picture of how well they manage their engagement with…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the development of thinking about the information needed by companies to create an accurate picture of how well they manage their engagement with customers, taking into account the evolution of thinking and practice in this area over the past three decades towards the idea of data-driven customer engagement. It then describes the evolution and use of an assessment and benchmarking process and tool which provide the needed information.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review, conceptual analysis and explanation of the management consulting process are used.

Findings

Companies can get an accurate picture of how well they manage customer engagement provided that a careful assessment approach is used where assessors are properly selected and trained and that there is a strong focus on compliance with requirements rather than “box-ticking” based upon managers’ perceptions.

Research limitations/implications

The assessment and benchmarking process was developed mainly for use by larger companies, though the findings could be adapted for use by smaller companies.

Practical implications

Companies whose success depends upon customer engagement should consider using the assessment and benchmarking tool to guide their planning and implementation. They should heed the warnings about the risks of inaccurate assessments which may arise because of the incentives by which managers are managed.

Social implications

The assessment and benchmarking process has been used by the public sector and government, and given government’s desire to engage citizens better, they should consider adopting the ideas in this paper to reform citizen engagement.

Originality/value

This is the only paper which reviews the development of the assessment process for customer engagement.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Merlin David Stone and Neil David Woodcock

The purpose of this article is to explain how the management of the two areas business intelligence (BI) and customer insight (CI) needs to be brought together to support…

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18075

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explain how the management of the two areas business intelligence (BI) and customer insight (CI) needs to be brought together to support a company's interactive marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is based on the author's work in consultancy and in assessing client company's customer management capabilities and performance, as well as a review of some of the literature on BI and CI.

Findings

The article suggests that companies need to pay close attention to the governance of BI, as a self-service approach to BI becomes increasingly used by CI teams.

Research limitations/implications

The review of literature carried out by the authors suggests that the interface between BI and CI is poorly researched and would benefit from a significant research effort.

Originality/value

The focus on the interface between BI and CI is relatively new. The authors hope that it will trigger significant research.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

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Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Debra Zahay

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743

Abstract

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Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Rodney McAdam, William Keogh, Renee S. Reid and Neil Mitchell

The purpose of this research is to evaluate the longitudinal effect of innovation programmes on improving the process of innovation in manufacturing SMEs. The process of…

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3125

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to evaluate the longitudinal effect of innovation programmes on improving the process of innovation in manufacturing SMEs. The process of innovation in organisations covers people, process and technology. Therefore interventions in the form of innovation improvement programmes often require high levels of complexity. This complexity is compounded in SMEs, where issues such as scarce resources and skill shortages must be recognised.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case research methodology combined with an innovation evaluation model is used to evaluate the longitudinal effect of an innovation intervention programme, which combined taught modules and Critical Action Learning networks over an eighteen month period. Within‐group comparisons are made.

Findings/research implications

The findings reveal that SMEs, which have high levels of innovation improvement, adopted a broad process based approach to innovation rather than using a narrow technical definition of innovation. These SMEs also developed a process of critically reflective action learning to ground the innovation in organisational practice.

Originality/value

There is a paucity of longitudinal research studies on innovation interventions in SMEs.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

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13785

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Harvey Maylor and Neil Turner

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of complexity and its management from an OM perspective, building on and extending the systematic…

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3417

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of complexity and its management from an OM perspective, building on and extending the systematic literature review published in this journal in 2011, and provide a foundation for exploring the interactions between complexities and responses.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes a subjective view of complexity, focusing on the “lived experience” of managers. It takes an updated systematic literature review, and demonstrates the comprehensiveness of a framework to classify complexities of projects. It reports the findings from 43 workshops with over 1,100 managers.

Findings

First, the complexity framework is effective in aiding understanding. Second, and somewhat unexpectedly, managers were able to identify strategies to reduce the majority of complexities that they faced. Third, the workshops identified a typology of responses to residual complexities.

Research limitations/implications

The framework has demonstrated its utility, and a gap in understanding emergent complexities is identified. The framework further presents the opportunity to explore the recursive nature of complexity and response.

Practical implications

This paper provides a framework that is both comprehensive and comprehensible. The authors demonstrate that complexities can be reduced and provide a means to assess responses to residual complexities, including potentially matching managers to projects.

Originality/value

This work extends the previous systematic review combined with extensive empirical data to generate findings that are having impact in practice, and have the potential to strengthen a relatively neglected area within OM. A research agenda is suggested to support this.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Lee Barron

Abstract

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Tattoos and Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-215-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1936

THERE was a rather remarkable statement made at the Royal Institute of British Architects by Mr. Berwick Sayers last month. He affirmed that so far as the recorded issues…

Abstract

THERE was a rather remarkable statement made at the Royal Institute of British Architects by Mr. Berwick Sayers last month. He affirmed that so far as the recorded issues of the reference libraries in the municipal libraries of London were concerned, only 8,880 books were consulted daily. This, as the statistical account of twenty‐nine public libraries, shows an average of a fraction over 302 books daily. To some this may seem not an inadequate issue, if all the books recorded are books which the student and the searcher for information have used. The point of the meeting at which the remark was made was that the reference libraries of London should do more in co‐operation with industry, and it was argued by the representatives of ASLIB who took part in the conference that our London reference libraries should be strengthened in the science and technology departments, even at the expense of the lending libraries. The experience of the public librarian seemed to be that few people lived in London near their work; and that they had command of the special libraries in London in a way that provincial industrialists had not, and therefore they did not make any use that mattered of London reference libraries. The Chambers of Commerce in the various boroughs of London consist of small traders as a rule whose main purpose is “to keep down the rates,” and who have very little connection with industry on the scale in the minds of the ASLIB representatives. In short, the chief function of the London public libraries is mainly that of home reading. Ultimately the solution of the reference problem may be the establishment of one or two great regional reference libraries supported by the co‐operation of the boroughs. Co‐operation, however, is in its initial stages yet, and it will probably be some time before such an ideal, if it be an ideal, is achieved.

Details

New Library World, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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