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Book part
Publication date: 13 July 2017

Eugene Y.J. Tee, TamilSelvan Ramis, Elaine F. Fernandez and Neil Paulsen

This study examines how perceptions of injustice, anger, and group identification motivate follower intentions to engage in collective action against leaders. The study…

Abstract

This study examines how perceptions of injustice, anger, and group identification motivate follower intentions to engage in collective action against leaders. The study revolved around the Malaysian prime minister’s actions and responses toward allegations of misuse of public funds. Responses from 112 Malaysians via a cross-sectional survey revealed that follower perceptions of leader injustice are significantly related to anger toward the leader, which in turn is related to intentions to engage in collective action. The relationship between perceptions of distributive injustice and anger is moderated by group identification, while group efficacy moderates the relationship between anger and collective action intentions.

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Emotions and Identity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-438-5

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Neil Paulsen, Victor J. Callan, Oluremi Ayoko and Diana Saunders

The purpose of this paper is to add to the understanding of how transformational leaders influence R&D team outcomes around being more innovative. In particular, the study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to add to the understanding of how transformational leaders influence R&D team outcomes around being more innovative. In particular, the study aims to focus on the role of group identification in mediating innovative outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 104 participants in a large Australian R&D organization were surveyed twice during a 12 month period of major restructuring and change. These matched respondents came from 29 different teams.

Findings

Results revealed that group identification and perceived support for creativity exerted equal independent effects in fully mediating the relationship between transformational leadership and team innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The potential for leadership to influence innovation through identification raises interesting alternative possibilities. Future research may generate new insights by investigating alternative samples, leadership styles or using qualitative methods.

Practical implications

Findings point to how a more transformational style of leadership influences team climate and identification, and in turn innovation in the context of scientific R&D teams. Such styles do produce better outcomes, both for the organization around more innovative products and processes, but also for team members who engage in more creative team environments.

Originality/value

These findings add to the conceptual understanding of processes through which transformational styles of leadership promote innovation, and highlight the benefits gained by promoting more transformational styles of leadership to generate more innovative outcomes from teams and employees.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Neil Paulsen, Diana Maldonado, Victor J. Callan and Oluremi Ayoko

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of the charismatic dimension of transformational leadership on team processes and innovative outcomes in research…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of the charismatic dimension of transformational leadership on team processes and innovative outcomes in research and development (R&D) teams.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected by surveying 34 teams that totalled 178 participants. Surveys measured charismatic leadership style, team identity, cooperative strategies and team innovation.

Findings

Results reveal the importance of managers assuming a charismatic style of leadership to encourage innovation. Charismatic leaders promote team innovation by supporting a sense of team identity and commitment, and encourage team members to cooperate through the expression of ideas and participation in decisions.

Research limitations/implications

The study is conducted in a single R&D organization and future research should explore the influence of these factors in other settings. The measures of team innovation are based on the perceptions of the team members, and future research needs to include a wider variety of data sources over time.

Practical implications

Successful team leaders who employ a more charismatic style facilitate more cooperative interactions in teams. Teams with a strong team identity combined with the exercise of cooperative behaviours are more innovative.

Originality/value

The preliminary model tested enhances the understanding of the importance of the leaders in influencing team processes and innovation. Leaders who are more transformational in style influence followers by affecting their sense of identity. This sense of identity influences how well teams adopt and follow more cooperative strategies to resolve issues and to make decisions. In turn, the model shows how these factors influence team innovation.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

Eugene Y. J. Tee, Yin Lu Ng and Neil Paulsen

Displaying appropriate emotions enhances followers’ perceptions toward a leader. The present study examined the moderating effect of leader group-prototypicality on the…

Abstract

Displaying appropriate emotions enhances followers’ perceptions toward a leader. The present study examined the moderating effect of leader group-prototypicality on the relationship between leader’s emotion appropriateness and followers’ perceptions toward the leader (i.e., self-sacrifice intentions and effectiveness). Based on a set of 366 Malaysian students’ experimental survey responses, leader group-prototypicality emerged as a significant moderator. Specifically, the effect of leader’s emotion appropriateness was stronger for group-prototypical leaders than non-group-prototypical leaders. Hence, to enhance their perceived effectiveness, leaders should portray appropriate emotions and ensure that they are viewed as representative by their followers.

Details

Emotions and the Organizational Fabric
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-939-3

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 July 2017

Abstract

Details

Emotions and Identity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-438-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

Abstract

Details

Emotions and the Organizational Fabric
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-939-3

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Emotions and the Organizational Fabric
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-939-3

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Slawomir Magala

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Philip J. Corr, Neil McNaughton, Margaret R. Wilson, Ann Hutchison, Giles Burch and Arthur Poropat

Neuroscience research on human motivation in the workplace is still in its infancy. There is a large industrial and organizational (IO) psychology literature containing…

Abstract

Neuroscience research on human motivation in the workplace is still in its infancy. There is a large industrial and organizational (IO) psychology literature containing numerous theories of motivation, relating to prosocial and productive, and, less so, “darker” antisocial and counter-productive, behaviors. However, the development of a viable over-arching theoretical framework has proved elusive. In this chapter, we argue that basic neuropsychological systems related to approach, avoidance, and their conflict, may provide such a framework, one which we discuss in terms of the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) of personality. We argue that workplace behaviors may be understood by reference to the motivational types that are formed from the combination of basic approach, avoidance, and conflict-related personalities. We offer suggestions for future research to explore workplace behaviors in terms of the wider literature on the neuroscience of motivation.

Details

Recent Developments in Neuroscience Research on Human Motivation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-474-7

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Kristina Montgomerie, Margot Edwards and Kaye Thorn

The purpose of this paper is to understand the factors perceived to influence successful online learning in organisations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the factors perceived to influence successful online learning in organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising an exploratory, qualitative approach, 20 participants were involved in semi-structured interviews before, during and after their involvement in an online development programme.

Findings

Key factors perceived to influence participants’ learning, in order of their perceived influence, are online considerations (such as time allocation and discipline), peer support and technical delivery. Organisational culture was also found to have some influence, however further research is required to establish the extent this influence. The compounding or mitigating effect of the interplays of these factors was highlighted.

Research limitations/implications

Although the study is limited by its small sample, it provides a basis for the further exploration of online learning in an organisational context and draws attention to the effect of the interplay of factors affecting learning. Research into the longitudinal influence of online learning in organisations, and particularly research which enables breakdown by learning style may assist in the development of programmes suitable for most participants.

Originality/value

Online learning is becoming a common tool for employee development in the workplace and yet little is known about the factors that influence learning in this environment. This paper offers new insights into that gap through a progressive evaluation of factors facilitating or inhibiting online learning.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 35 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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