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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Thomas Fletcher, Neil Ormerod, Katherine Dashper, James Musgrave, Andrew Bradley and Alan Marvell

This article explores (1) student perceptions and understanding of Events Management; (2) how Events Management is positioned by different UK Higher Education providers through…

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores (1) student perceptions and understanding of Events Management; (2) how Events Management is positioned by different UK Higher Education providers through their online marketing; and (3) the perceived value of an Events Management degree among students.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods approach, combining an online student questionnaire (n = 524), semi-structured interviews with current first year Events Management students (n = 24) at two UK universities, and website analysis of all Events Management degrees offered in the UK.

Findings

Students demonstrate a lack of knowledge about what Events Management is, what a career in Events Management might entail and the perceived value of an Events Management degree. This suggests the need to reposition Events Management degrees within a broader applied management base. Current course marketing presents a narrow view of Events Management degrees and the narrow vocationally-laden narrative undersells and “over-vocationalises” the subject.

Practical implications

Understanding student perceptions better will help universities market Events Management degrees more effectively and will benefit broader efforts to illustrate the value and credibility of it as a degree subject choice and career. More balanced presentation between the practical and non-practical aspects of the courses in university marketing may help reposition Events Management alongside more readily understood vocational subjects.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine student perceptions over the credibility of Events Management degrees. It also addresses Park and Park's (2017) observation that reviews of Events Management education and curricula are conspicuously absent from Hospitality and Tourism journals.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Neil Small and Russell Mannion

Mainstream health economics labours under a misleading understanding of the nature of the topic area and suffers from a concomitant poverty of thinking about theory and method…

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Abstract

Purpose

Mainstream health economics labours under a misleading understanding of the nature of the topic area and suffers from a concomitant poverty of thinking about theory and method. The purpose here is to explore this critical position and argue that health economics should aspire to being more than a technical discipline. It can, and should, engage with transformative discourse.

Design/methodology/approach

It is argued that the hermeneutic sciences, emphasising interpretation not instrumentality or domination, offer a route into the change to which one seeks to contribute. The article specifically focuses on the way Habermas provides insights in his approach to knowledge, reason and political economy. How he emphasises complexity and interaction within cultural milieu is explored and primacy is given to preserving the life‐world against the encroachments of a narrow rationalization.

Findings

The argument for a critical re‐imagining of health economics is presented in three stages. First, the antecedents, current assumptions and critical voices from contemporary economics and health economics are reviewed. Second, the way in which health is best understood via engaging with the complexity of both the subject itself and the society and culture within which it is embedded is explored. Third, the contribution that hermeneutics, and Habermas's critical theory, could make to a new health economics is examined.

Originality/value

The paper offers a radical alternative to health economics. It explores the shortcomings of current thinking and argues an optimistic position. Progress via reason is possible if one reframes both in the direction of communication and in the appreciation of reflexivity and communality. This is a position that resonates with many who challenge prevailing paradigms, in economics and elsewhere.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Phil Harris and Andrew Lock

797

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1975

Natural selection—survival of the fittest—is as old as life itself. Applied genetics which is purposeful in contrast to natural selection also has a long history, particularly in…

Abstract

Natural selection—survival of the fittest—is as old as life itself. Applied genetics which is purposeful in contrast to natural selection also has a long history, particularly in agriculture; it has received impetus from the more exacting demands of the food industry for animal breeds with higher lean : fat and meat : bone ratios, for crops resistant to the teeming world of parasites. Capturing the exquisite scent, the colours and form beautiful of a rose is in effect applied genetics and it has even been applied to man. For example, Frederick the Great, Emperor of Prussia, to maintain a supply of very tall men for his guards—his Prussian Guards averaged seven feet in height—ordered them to marry very tall women to produce offspring carrying the genes of great height. In recent times, however, research and experiment in genetic control, more in the nature of active interference with genetic composition, has developed sufficiently to begin yielding results. It is self‐evident that in the field of micro‐organisms, active interference or manipulations will produce greater knowledge and understanding of the gene actions than in any other field or by any other techniques. The phenomenon of “transferred drug resistance”, the multi‐factorial resistance, of a chemical nature, transferred from one species of micro‐organisms to another, from animal to human pathogens, its role in mainly intestinal pathology and the serious hazards which have arisen from it; all this has led to an intensive study of plasmids and their mode of transmission. The work of the Agricultural Research Council's biologists (reported elsewhere in this issue) in relation to nitrogen‐fixing genes and transfer from one organism able to fix nitrogen to another not previously having this ability, illustrates the extreme importance of this new field. Disease susceptibility, the inhibition of invasiveness which can be acquired by relatively “silent” micro‐organisms, a better understanding of virulence and the possible “disarming” of organisms, particularly those of particular virulence to vulnerable groups. Perhaps this is looking for too much too soon, but Escherichia coli would seem to offer more scope for genetic experiments than most; it has serotypes of much variability and viability; and its life and labours in the human intestine have assumed considerable importance in recent years. The virulence of a few of its serotypes constitute an important field in food epidemiology. Their capacity to transfer plasmids—anent transfer of drug resistance— to strains of other organisms resident in the intestines, emphasizes the need for close study, with safeguards.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 77 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2019

Richard Rymarz and Leonardo Franchi

Abstract

Details

Catholic Teacher Preparation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-007-9

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

60

Abstract

Details

Circuit World, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1967

Ungoed J. — Thomas

November 8, 1966 Trade union — Official — Dismissal of — Liability of official to dismissal at will and pleasure of Executive Council — Member under disability if dismissed for

Abstract

November 8, 1966 Trade union — Official — Dismissal of — Liability of official to dismissal at will and pleasure of Executive Council — Member under disability if dismissed for misconduct — Dismissal of official and member for insubordination to General Secretary — Appeal to Executive Council chaired by General Secretary — General Secretary bringing forward complaint — Whether rules of natural justice applicable — Executive Council hearing prejudicial matters irrelevant to charge of insubordination — Absence of official during statement of prejudicial matters — No opportunity to answer prejudicial and irrelevant matters — Whether union entitled to treat member as if dismissed for misconduct — Whether compliance with rules of natural justice.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 1 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1947

AFTER the most severe winter in living memory we can look at the position of libraries with some satisfaction. The almost impossible weather energized some libraries as never…

Abstract

AFTER the most severe winter in living memory we can look at the position of libraries with some satisfaction. The almost impossible weather energized some libraries as never before and many report a circulation surpassing that of any previous winter. Many circumstances go to such a result. The failure of other types of circulating library, owing to the continuing scarcity of books, to meet demands formerly made upon them is one. The earlier closing than was the case of most places of amusement should also be borne in mind. The disappointing thing about the situation is that we are unable ourselves to supply the best fiction, for example, in editions of which we can be satisfied. We have not been able to take advantage of our opportunities.

Details

New Library World, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1977

The long controversy that has waxed furiously around the implementation of the EEC Directives on the inspection of poultry meat and hygiene standards to be observed in poultry…

Abstract

The long controversy that has waxed furiously around the implementation of the EEC Directives on the inspection of poultry meat and hygiene standards to be observed in poultry slaughterhouses, cutting‐up premises, &c, appears to be resolved at last. (The Prayer lodged against the Regulations when they were formally laid before Parliament just before the summer recess, which meant they would have to be debated when the House reassembled, could have resulted in some delay to the early operative dates, but little chance of the main proposals being changed.) The controversy began as soon as the EEC draft directive was published and has continued from the Directive of 1971 with 1975 amendments. There has been long and painstaking study of problems by the Ministry with all interested parties; enforcement was not the least of these. The expansion and growth of the poultry meat industry in the past decade has been tremendous and the constitution of what is virtually a new service, within the framework of general food inspection, was inevitable. None will question the need for efficient inspection or improved and higher standards of hygiene, but the extent of the

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 79 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 January 1995

Abstract

Details

Economics, Econometrics and the LINK: Essays in Honor of Lawrence R.Klein
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44481-787-7

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