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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2005

Ronald K. Mitchell

Most of us believe that entrepreneurs are special. We do this because both scholars and practitioners tell us so.

Abstract

Most of us believe that entrepreneurs are special. We do this because both scholars and practitioners tell us so.

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International Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-227-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Neil Brewer, Patricia Mitchell and Nathan Weber

This study examined the relationship among biological sex, gender role, organizational status, and conflict management behavior of males and females in three similar…

Abstract

This study examined the relationship among biological sex, gender role, organizational status, and conflict management behavior of males and females in three similar organizations. Individuals (N = 118) from upper and lower status organizational positions completed the Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory‐II, in the context of two recalled organizational conflicts (Rahim, 1983a), and the Bern Sex Role Inventory (Bern, 1974). After controlling for biological sex, when compared with other gender roles masculine individuals were highest on the dominating conflict style, whereas feminine individuals were highest on the avoiding style, and androgynous individuals on the integrating style. Further, upper organizational status individuals were higher on the integrating style, while lower status individuals reported greater use of avoiding and obliging styles.

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International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Neil Crow

Discusses the new commercial status of the Prison Service under therecent governmental reforms introducing market forces into the service.Looks specifically at catering in…

Abstract

Discusses the new commercial status of the Prison Service under the recent governmental reforms introducing market forces into the service. Looks specifically at catering in prisons. Uses case studies to illustrate.

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Facilities, vol. 13 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Rodney McAdam, Renee Reid and Neil Mitchell

There is a paucity of studies on the complex longitudinal dynamics of innovation incorporation within family‐based small‐ to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in response to…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a paucity of studies on the complex longitudinal dynamics of innovation incorporation within family‐based small‐ to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in response to market and technological change. Attempts at innovation implementation are likely to be influenced by the dynamic effects of critical incidents or crisis points in small family‐based firms. The aim of this EU‐funded study is to explore the effects of critical incidents on innovation implementation within a regional cluster of family‐based SMEs over a two‐year period.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology involves the longitudinal study of a regional cluster of five family‐based businesses in relation to innovation implementation at firm level. A participant observation and critical action learning methodology was used to study the firms over the two‐year period of the study.

Findings

The findings, as summarised using a conceptual model, show that the critical incidents acted interactively with the firm's lifecycle stage and its approach to family versus business, to either act as a catalyst for developing more radical innovation or in maintaining the status quo or continuous improvement.

Practical implications

The findings can act as a guide for how family‐based firms can evaluate and maximise their responses to critical incidents and leverage them to encourage more radical approaches to innovation implementation.

Originality/value

There is a paucity of longitudinal studies on the effect of critical incidents on approaches to innovation implementation in family businesses.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Rodney McAdam, William Keogh, Renee S. Reid and Neil Mitchell

The purpose of this research is to evaluate the longitudinal effect of innovation programmes on improving the process of innovation in manufacturing SMEs. The process of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to evaluate the longitudinal effect of innovation programmes on improving the process of innovation in manufacturing SMEs. The process of innovation in organisations covers people, process and technology. Therefore interventions in the form of innovation improvement programmes often require high levels of complexity. This complexity is compounded in SMEs, where issues such as scarce resources and skill shortages must be recognised.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case research methodology combined with an innovation evaluation model is used to evaluate the longitudinal effect of an innovation intervention programme, which combined taught modules and Critical Action Learning networks over an eighteen month period. Within‐group comparisons are made.

Findings/research implications

The findings reveal that SMEs, which have high levels of innovation improvement, adopted a broad process based approach to innovation rather than using a narrow technical definition of innovation. These SMEs also developed a process of critically reflective action learning to ground the innovation in organisational practice.

Originality/value

There is a paucity of longitudinal research studies on innovation interventions in SMEs.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Stuart Hannabuss

Abstract

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Reference Reviews, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Claire Seaman, Stuart Graham and Richard Ben

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Marc Esteve, Monica Grau and Ramon Cabrera Valle

The purpose of this study is to examine values among public sector employees. Furthermore, this study will identify differences according to several demographical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine values among public sector employees. Furthermore, this study will identify differences according to several demographical variables with relevant policy making implications.

Design/methodology/approach

Once the literature review on public sector values and the description of the tri-axial model is presented, analysis based on a survey of 3,018 public sectors will be undertaken. The sample consists of employees working in the Government of Andalusia, Spain.

Findings

Results reveal the domination of pragmatic values, as well as values connected to the ethical axis. The study also shows how these values vary according to several demographic characteristics of the respondents, especially when considering their level of education and their respective tenure.

Research limitations/implications

When managing employees from public organizations, emphasis should be given to the development of an organizational culture that represents a configuration of both pragmatic and ethical axes.

Originality/value

This study was tested with relatively a large sample size (more than 3,000 observations), thus adding significant and original value to the empirical test of the tri-axial model.

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2019

Julie Barrett, Simon Evans and Neil Mapes

The purpose of this paper is to examine the recent evidence relating to green (nature-based) dementia care for people living with dementia in long-term accommodation and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the recent evidence relating to green (nature-based) dementia care for people living with dementia in long-term accommodation and care settings (housing for older people that provides both accommodation and care, such as residential care homes, nursing homes and extra care housing schemes). The review formed part of a pilot study exploring interaction with nature for people living with dementia in care homes and extra care housing schemes in the UK. Rather than a comprehensive systematic or critical literature review, the intention was to increase understanding of green dementia care to support the pilot study.

Design/methodology/approach

The review draws together the published and grey literature on the impacts of green (nature-based) dementia care, the barriers and enablers and good practice in provision. People living with dementia in accommodation and care settings are the focus of this review, due to the research study of which the review is part. Evidence relating to the impacts of engaging with nature on people in general, older people and residents in accommodation and care is also briefly examined as it has a bearing on people living with dementia.

Findings

Although interaction with the natural environment may not guarantee sustained wellbeing for all people living with dementia, there is some compelling evidence for a number of health and wellbeing benefits for many. However, there is a clear need for more large-scale rigorous research in this area, particularly with reference to health and wellbeing outcomes for people living with dementia in accommodation and care settings for which the evidence is limited. There is a stronger evidence base on barriers and enablers to accessing nature for people living with dementia in such settings.

Research limitations/implications

The literature review was conducted to support a pilot study exploring green (nature-based) dementia care in care homes and extra care housing schemes in the UK. Consequently, the focus of the review was on green dementia care in accommodation and care settings. The study, and thus the review, also focussed on direct contact with nature (whether that occurs outdoors or indoors) rather than indirect contact (e.g. viewing nature in a photograph, on a TV screen or through a window) or simulated nature (e.g. robot pets). Therefore, this paper is not a full review of all aspects of green dementia care.

Originality/value

This paper presents an up-to-date review of literature relating to green dementia care in accommodation and care settings. It was successful in increasing understanding to support a pilot study exploring opportunities, benefits, barriers and enablers to interaction with nature for people living with dementia in care homes and extra care housing schemes in the UK. It demonstrated the impacts, value and accessibility of nature engagement in these settings and identified gaps in the evidence base. This review and subsequent pilot study provide a strong platform from which to conduct future research exploring green dementia care in accommodation and care settings.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Ronald K. Mitchell and Stephen J. O’Neil

Decision‐making institutions evident in today’s small businesses display remarkable similarities to medieval feudalism. This paper presents: (1) the institutions of…

Abstract

Decision‐making institutions evident in today’s small businesses display remarkable similarities to medieval feudalism. This paper presents: (1) the institutions of feudalism as applied to small business, (2) a theoretical framework as a foundation for explaining obvious parallels, and (3) propositions that furnish a basis for further research.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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