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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Elizabeth Semeraro and Neil M. Boyd

Administrators in higher-education settings routinely create planning documents that help steer the organization in mission-centric ways. In the area of sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

Administrators in higher-education settings routinely create planning documents that help steer the organization in mission-centric ways. In the area of sustainability planning, strategic plans, sustainability plans and climate action plans are the most common methods used. The purpose of this study is to evaluate if specific forms of planning predict sustainability outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This question was evaluated via an empirical archival study of the AASHE STARS database in relation to planning, administration and governance credits and criteria to determine if specific forms of planning were predictive of sustainability implementation outcomes in the categories of Education and Research, Operations, Diversity and Affordability, Human Resources, Investment, Public Engagement and Innovation.

Findings

Findings support the notion that climate action plans were most predictive of achieving sustainability outcomes, and strategic plans were best able to predict educational outcomes.

Practical implications

These findings have important implications for the design and execution of sustainability planning processes in higher-education institutions.

Originality/value

The academic literature contains relatively few empirical studies that demonstrate the capacity of planning on the realization of sustainability outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Cristina Alaimo and Jannis Kallinikos

Social media stage online patterns of social interaction that differ remarkably from ordinary forms of acting, talking and relating. To unravel these differences, we…

Abstract

Social media stage online patterns of social interaction that differ remarkably from ordinary forms of acting, talking and relating. To unravel these differences, we review the literature on micro-sociology and social psychology and derive a shorthand version of socially-embedded forms of interaction. We use that version as a yardstick for reconstructing and assessing the patterns of sociality social media promote. Our analysis shows that social media platforms stage highly stylized forms of social interaction such as liking, following, tagging, etc. that essentially serve the purpose of generating a calculable and machine-readable data footprint out of user platform participation. This online stylization of social interaction and the data it procures are, however, only the first steps of what we call the infrastructuring of social media. Social media use the data footprint that results from the stylization of social interaction to derive larger (and commercially relevant) social entities such as audiences, networks and groups that are constantly fed back to individuals and groups of users as personalized recommendations of one form or another. Social media infrastructure sociality as they provide the backstage operations and technological facilities out of which new habits and modes of social relatedness emerge and diffuse across the social fabric.

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2015

Shawn Michael Bullock

This chapter is the result of an interest in the professional and research literature exploring the intersection between education and digital technology. Decades of…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter is the result of an interest in the professional and research literature exploring the intersection between education and digital technology. Decades of research and press have largely focused on the ways in which particular devices might be productively used in the K-12 classroom. Educational radio, educational television, the computer, and more recently the tablet have all been framed as being valuable for supporting student learning. Critics such as Neil Selwyn have argued that research in educational technology needs to focus less on supporting particular devices and more on the nature of social interactions that are mediated, constrained, and enabled by various technological affordances.

Methodology/approach

This chapter reviews four theoretical frameworks in terms of their approach the social nature of the use of technology in education.

Findings

The chapter introduces a number of conceptual frameworks that are helpful for considering the social implications of using digital technologies to support the needs of diverse learners in a teacher education classroom.

Research implications

Scholars, especially who are also teacher educators can consider using and developing frameworks that are more robust for thinking about digital learning in education.

Originality/value

The value in this chapter lies in the critical conceptions explored and interrogated. The author demonstrates the complexity of teacher knowledge overlaid with technology.

Details

Exploring Pedagogies for Diverse Learners Online
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-672-0

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Neil Boyd and Brooke Gessner

The purpose of the present analysis is to show that HR systems are not always designed in ways that consider the well‐being of employees. In particular, performance metric…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present analysis is to show that HR systems are not always designed in ways that consider the well‐being of employees. In particular, performance metric methods seem to be designed with organizational goals in mind while focusing less on what employees need and desire.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review and multiple case‐study method was utilized.

Findings

The analysis showed that performance metrics should be revaluated by executives and HR professionals if they seek to develop socially responsible organizational cultures which care about the well‐being of employees.

Originality/value

The paper exposes the fact that performance appraisal techniques can be rooted in methodologies that ignore or deemphasize the value of employee well‐being. The analysis provides a context in which all HR practices can be questioned in relation to meeting the standards of a social justice agenda in the area of corporate social responsibility.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2015

Marc A. Grimmett and Robert A. Horne

African American student-athletes represent the largest racial minority group of athletes in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the majority of male…

Abstract

African American student-athletes represent the largest racial minority group of athletes in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the majority of male student-athletes in football and basketball. The NCAA has partnered with It’s On Us, an awareness campaign to help end sexual violence on college campuses. Intercollegiate athletics is a viable context, then, to consider transformative Black masculinity and sexual violence prevention. Transformative Black masculinity is when an African American or Black man intentionally employs his identity in the service of social justice and purposefully engages other Black males, as well as others, for that cause. This chapter considers transformative Black masculinity as a conceptual tool for the intentional engagement of Black male student-athletes within institutions of higher education for sexual violence prevention. Recommendations for policy, education and practice, and research are provided.

Details

Black Males and Intercollegiate Athletics: An Exploration of Problems and Solutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-394-1

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Luis F. Alvarez León

A wave of technological change in the first decades of the twenty-first century is prefiguring a fundamental restructuring of society. Key among the driving forces behind…

Abstract

A wave of technological change in the first decades of the twenty-first century is prefiguring a fundamental restructuring of society. Key among the driving forces behind such change are powerful technologies with the potential to exert major transformations on a range of human activities and, crucially, to do so without direct human intervention. The technologies collectively referred to as Artificial Intelligence, or AI represent a productive lens through which to investigate two interrelated transformations: the emergence of self-driving cars and the coming shifts in education. This is in particular because AI’s versatility has led it to be directly applied (and increasingly valued) both in new automated driving technologies, and in the development of new forms of instruction. From the educational perspective, this means that the same technologies that are transforming workforce conditions are also reshaping – directly and indirectly – the approaches, objectives, and experiences of students and educational institutions. This chapter lays out how these twin transformations are likely to play out in the case of the automotive industry and the educational pathways of two occupations closely associated with it: automotive engineers and repair technicians. Two key arguments underpin this examination. First, educational programs for these two occupations, (and beyond) should be broadened to develop versatility and adaptability through tools and perspectives that allow people to move vertically within organizations and laterally across industries in the face of rapid technological change. Second, these educational programs must explicitly tackle AI and the coming technological revolution from a variety of dimensions that connect technical skills acquisition with the context on how these technologies are incorporated in society, how they are governed, and what are the various responses to them. This will allow students and professionals to navigate a rapidly changing labor landscape better while endowing them with the vocabulary to actively participate in the debates that shape its construction.

Details

The Educational Intelligent Economy: Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and the Internet of Things in Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-853-4

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2020

Karlijn Massar, Annika Nübold, Robert van Doorn and Karen Schelleman-Offermans

There is an abundance of empirical evidence on the positive effects of employment – and the detrimental effects of unemployment – on individuals’ psychological and…

Abstract

There is an abundance of empirical evidence on the positive effects of employment – and the detrimental effects of unemployment – on individuals’ psychological and physical health and well-being. In this chapter, the authors explore whether and how self-employment or entrepreneurship could be a solution for individuals’ (re)entry to the job market and which (psychological) variables enhance the likelihood of entrepreneurial success. Specifically, the authors first focus on unemployment and its detrimental effects for health and wellbeing, and outline the existing interventions aimed at assisting reemployment and combating the negative consequences of unemployment for individuals’ well-being. Then, the authors will explore entrepreneurship as a potential solution to unemployment and explore the psychological variables that enhance the likelihood of entrepreneurial success. One of the variables the authors highlight as particularly relevant for self-employment is the second-order construct of Psychological Capital (PsyCap; Luthans, Avolio, Avey, & Norman, 2007), as well as its individual components – hope, optimism, efficacy, and resilience. PsyCap is a malleable construct that can be successfully trained, and PsyCap interventions are inherently strength-based and have positive effects on employees’ and entrepreneurs’ performance and wellbeing. Therefore, the authors end the chapter by suggesting that a PsyCap component in existing education and training programs for entrepreneurship is likely to not only increase entrepreneurial intentions and success, but also increases participants’ well-being, self-esteem, and the general confidence they can pick up the reigns and take back control over their (professional) lives.

Details

Entrepreneurial and Small Business Stressors, Experienced Stress, and Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-397-8

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 September 2012

Kjell Hausken, Gregory Levitin and Victor Levitin

This chapter analyses efforts exerted and utilities obtained in a double lawsuit. This is a usual situation when insurance companies are involved in damage compensation. A…

Abstract

This chapter analyses efforts exerted and utilities obtained in a double lawsuit. This is a usual situation when insurance companies are involved in damage compensation. A victim files the first lawsuit against its insurance company for coverage. If the victim loses, there are no further lawsuits. If the victim wins, the insurance company files the second lawsuit against the perpetrator to recover its expenses.

The situation is described as a two-period game, which is solved with backward induction. The model is based on the Hirshleifer and Osborne (2001) litigation success function that expresses influence of the counterparts’ efforts on the outcome of a lawsuit.

The chapter analyses the optimal resource allocations in each lawsuit as functions of effort unit costs, the value of each lawsuit and the contest intensities in the lawsuits. It is shown that a one-period game where the victim, the insurance company and the perpetrator choose their efforts simultaneously and independently gives the same solution as the two-period game.

In 2008 in the United States 15 million lawsuits were filed. Several of these were linked in the sense that subsequent lawsuits depend on the outcomes of earlier lawsuits.

Lawsuits are commonly analysed separately. The chapter analyses in a novel manner the implications of two linked lawsuits referred to as a double lawsuit.

Details

Research in Law and Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-898-4

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Marty Mattare

Entrepreneurship education is rapidly growing, both in the number of schools offering programs and in the range of courses. But, survey data shows that entrepreneurship…

Abstract

Entrepreneurship education is rapidly growing, both in the number of schools offering programs and in the range of courses. But, survey data shows that entrepreneurship education is more likely to focus on how to evaluate business opportunities, write a business plan, present a proposal to investors, and conduct analytical exercises to determine value. The success of a venture begins with the entrepreneur, and as students become entrepreneurs, they will need to wear a variety of “hats” and serve as the primary finance, marketing, human resources, and operations person. High self-efficacy, emotional intelligence, and well-developed interpersonal skills have been shown to equate to a firmʼs success.These skills are rarely polished and perfected in the classroom. But, because they are so critical, more concentration on their development is needed in the entrepreneurship curriculum. This article presents the case and provides a model for developing “Use of Self” skills in the entrepreneurship classroom.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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