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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2017

Jenna Walker, Jo Ashby, Neil Gredecki and Emma Tarpey

The purpose of this paper is to understand the constructions of female-perpetrated intimate partner violence (IPV) among postgraduate (PG) students studying and preparing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the constructions of female-perpetrated intimate partner violence (IPV) among postgraduate (PG) students studying and preparing for a career in forensic psychology. A social constructionist methodological framework was adopted in order to explore students’ dominant discourses surrounding gender and IPV. Of particular interest was how female perpetrators of IPV within heterosexual relationships were constructed and subsequently positioned by students in terms of social and gender identity. Implications regarding future practice for graduates in relation to risk assessment and treatment interventions are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

Six female PG forensic students took part in a qualitative focus group and discussed their understanding of IPV and views regarding perpetration. Focus group members were also asked to discuss details of a vignette depicting a violent relationship where gender identity was purposefully removed. The focus group interview data were analysed using Foucauldian discourse analysis.

Findings

The students constructed IPV as a behaviour that was predominantly perpetrated by men towards women. Students acknowledged that female-perpetrated IPV occurred; however, such behaviour was constructed as non-threatening, and subsequently, less serious than male-perpetrated IPV. Moreover, the analysis revealed that the overall discourses drawn on by the students projected a feminine representation of female IPV that positioned women as emotionally unstable, vulnerable and acting in self-defence.

Research limitations/implications

Students’ constructions of female-perpetrated IPV appeared to minimise aggression. It is argued that the positioning of women in terms of vulnerability serves to undermine any responsibility for perpetrating violence among this group of students. In terms of implications for practice, oversimplified assumptions in relation to gendered constructions have the potential to inhibit female IPV from being recognised as a serious form of aggression, and it is argued that this could potentially bias assessments of risk leading to an under-estimation of threat. Female perpetrators of IPV may subsequently receive inadequate supervision and intervention and inadequate levels of victim safety planning may occur. These gendered constructions may also inhibit male victims from seeking help and help being offered.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the importance of understanding constructions of IPV among students who are preparing for careers as a forensic psychology practitioner. Female IPV is clearly challenging. With respect to the social construction of IPV, the students in this study made many assumptions about female identity by linking this to feminine and essentialist ideas that constrain women as emotionally and biologically vulnerable. Such findings raise questions about whether future training and study programmes are equipped to critically challenge the dominant discourses and subsequent constructions of gender and IPV. Thus, this study has highlighted the need for further research around constructions of IPV in this field of work in order to fully examine potential knowledge gaps in training and teaching of future forensic practitioners.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2021

Stefanie Oliveira Antunes, Verity Wainwright and Neil Gredecki

This paper aims to provide an overview of current suicide prevention across the UK criminal justice system (CJS). It considers shortcomings in current provision and how…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of current suicide prevention across the UK criminal justice system (CJS). It considers shortcomings in current provision and how improvements could be made by drawing on international practice. Recommendations for practice going forward and suggestions for future research are made based on the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides an overview of suicide prevention research to date. Relevant literature was identified through a basic journal article search, including terms such as “probation”, “criminal justice system”, “suicide”, “suicide prevention”, “UK” and “suicide theory”.

Findings

This paper highlights opportunities to improve practice based on the current evidence base, making several recommendations and suggestions for practice, including improving multi-agency cooperation through clearer distribution of responsibilities, simplifying data sharing and investing in trauma-focussed suicide training for staff.

Practical implications

This paper considers how research and psychological theory has informed suicide prevention practice in the UK. Limitations and challenges in applying theory to practice are explored, in the context of research with frontline staff who use such policies. This review proposes potential improvements to suicide prevention implementation to reduce suicide across the wider CJS.

Originality/value

This article represents an overview of the existing literature as well as possible future ideas for policy. It is therefore a piece that represents the viewpoint of all involved authors.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Helen Johnson, Neil Gredecki and Fiona Rachel Wilks-Riley

The purpose of this paper is to provide a “spotlight” on the literature relating the selection, recruitment and development of staff working in personality disorder (PD) services.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a “spotlight” on the literature relating the selection, recruitment and development of staff working in personality disorder (PD) services.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews key documentation in the field of PD practice in relation to staff.

Findings

Despite the publication of guidelines for working with PD clients, a number of large scale enquiries suggest that some services have often failed to absorb and implement the recommendations made which has resulted in serious consequences.

Practical implications

A number of considerations relating to enhancing staff competency when working in PD units are presented.

Originality/value

The review outlines a number of good practice guidelines relating to the different stages of recruitment and employment for staff working with PD clients.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Neil Gredecki and Carol Ireland

Abstract

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Carol Ireland and Neil Gredecki

Abstract

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Carol A. Ireland and Neil Gredecki

Abstract

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Carol A. Ireland and Neil Gredecki

Abstract

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Carol Ireland and Neil Gredecki

Abstract

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Neil Gredecki and Carol Ireland

Abstract

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Carol A. Ireland and Neil Gredecki

Abstract

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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