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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Stephen A. Woods, Michael James Mustafa, Neil Anderson and Benjamin Sayer

The literature on individual differences in innovative work behavior (IWB) reveals inconsistencies in the relations of personality traits and tenure on innovation at work…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature on individual differences in innovative work behavior (IWB) reveals inconsistencies in the relations of personality traits and tenure on innovation at work. To provide greater clarity about the effects of these antecedents, the purpose of this paper is to report a study of the moderating effects of tenure on the associations of traits and IWB, and apply a theoretical lens based on the trait-activation theory.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 146 employees of a UK-based financial institution completed measures of conscientiousness and openness, and had three aspects of IWB (idea generation, promotion, and realization) rated by their line-supervisor. All participants were on graduate training programs. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test the moderating effects of tenure on the associations of the self-reported traits with the supervisor-rated IWB outcomes.

Findings

Tenure moderated the effects of conscientiousness on IWB, with highly conscientious employees being less innovative with longer tenure. Tenure moderated the effect of openness with idea generation with highly open employees generating more ideas if they were longer tenured.

Practical implications

Management of innovation requires differentiated strategies based on the personality traits and tenure of individual employees. Implications for recruitment, socialization and development are discussed.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine empirically the interactions of traits and contextual factors (i.e. organizational tenure) on IWB, framed around a strong theoretical foundation (i.e. trait activation theory). The study also makes notable contributions by measuring innovative behavior using a supervisor-rated and multidimensional approach.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Juergen Sauer and Neil Anderson

Describes a research project using a qualitative researchmethodology investigating innovation processes in two NHS hospitals.Employs a multi‐perspective approach to…

Abstract

Describes a research project using a qualitative research methodology investigating innovation processes in two NHS hospitals. Employs a multi‐perspective approach to examine the perception of innovation processes by actors at different organizational levels, whereas past innovation research has predominantly adopted a management perspective of innovation by concentrating upon the views and opinions of senior managers exclusively. Data collection methods include semi‐structured interviews, participant observation over a two‐month period, and document analysis; 26 interviews were conducted, transcribed and their content analysed. Shows that the perception of the innovation process differs very much across individuals. Illustrates two different types of innovation – imposed and emergent – each displaying substantively different developmental processes. Discusses the implications of these findings from the perspective of the practising manager and the applied psychologist conducting research into organizational innovation and change processes.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Paola Ragazzoni, Paola Baiardi, Anna Maria Zotti, Neil Anderson and M. West

Innovation has long been an area of interest to social scientists, and particularly to psychologists working in organisational settings. The team climate inventory (TCI…

Abstract

Innovation has long been an area of interest to social scientists, and particularly to psychologists working in organisational settings. The team climate inventory (TCI) is a facet‐specific measure of team climate for innovation that provides a picture of the level and quality of teamwork in a unit using a series of Likert scales. This paper describes its Italian validation in 585 working group members employed in health‐related and other contexts. The data were evaluated by means of factorial analysis (including an analysis of the internal consistency of the scales) and Pearson’s product moment correlations. The results show the internal consistency of the scales and the satisfactory factorial structure of the inventory, despite some variations in the factorial structure mainly due to cultural differences and the specific nature of Italian organisational systems.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Neil Anderson and Nigel King

Innovation and creativity at work have emerged as central concernsin recent years amongst applied researchers and practising managersalike. Little research, however, has…

Abstract

Innovation and creativity at work have emerged as central concerns in recent years amongst applied researchers and practising managers alike. Little research, however, has addressed the influence of different group membership and organisational status on perceptions of innovation processes. The results of a longitudinal study into group perceptions of organisational innovations are presented. Implications for future research and for the management of innovation at work are discussed in conclusion.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Neil Anderson

The Repertory Grid Technique, a psychologicalmethod capable of elucidating both the person‐jobmatch and the job‐person match in employeeselection, is presented. Potential…

Abstract

The Repertory Grid Technique, a psychological method capable of elucidating both the person‐job match and the job‐person match in employee selection, is presented. Potential applications for RGT Methodology in job analysis and decision making are proposed and practical recommendations for incorporating the technique in organisational recruitment procedures, stressing the potential benefits, are suggested.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Giles St J. Burch and Neil Anderson

Further to the development of the team climate inventory (TCI), a multidimensional team‐level measure of team‐working style, this paper reports the development and…

Abstract

Further to the development of the team climate inventory (TCI), a multidimensional team‐level measure of team‐working style, this paper reports the development and psychometric validation of the team selection inventory (TSI), an individual‐level version of the TCI for use in selection. The importance of examining selection at both person‐job and person‐team levels of analysis is discussed, the team climate literature briefly reviewed, and the need advocated for methods and measures to evaluate person‐team fit. The TSI was developed by changing the context of the TCI, from asking respondents about the actual climate of their existing work‐team, to what their preferred or ideal team‐working climate would be. Having developed items for the TSI through this change of context, six studies (total n=1,029) were carried out over a two‐year period to establish the underlying psychometric properties of this new measure. This paper reports the results pertaining to TSI factor structure, the newly developed social desirability scale, internal reliability, test‐retest reliability, and construct validity of the TSI compared with the NEO PI‐R and 16PF Version 5. Overall, the findings of these studies revealed acceptable levels of reliability and validity, showing promise for the TSI as an individual‐level measure of team climate preference for selection and development purposes in industrial, work and organizational psychology and human resource management. In conclusion, potential uses for the TSI in team selection and development are discussed.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Helena D. Cooper‐Thomas and Neil Anderson

The aim of this paper is threefold: to provide an overview of organizational socialization (OS) research; to present a new model of OS focusing on successful outcomes; and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is threefold: to provide an overview of organizational socialization (OS) research; to present a new model of OS focusing on successful outcomes; and finally to draw from both of these to suggest practical steps for both organizations aiming to socialize newcomers, and for newcomers themselves.

Design/methodology/approach

A summary literature review of the OS literature post‐entry, focusing on organizational, insider and newcomer actions.

Findings

The literature is used to develop and propose a new model of OS success, with five OS success indicators. Testable relationships are proposed between these indicators and both five learning domains and five learning sources.

Research limitations/implications

The research model has not been tested empirically. Further, the fifth success indicator, external representation, is a new and untested concept in the OS literature.

Practical implications

The paper provides a model that managers and newcomers may find useful to successfully negotiate the OS process. Further, the third section of the manuscript extensively discusses practical implications from the model and more broadly from the initial literature review.

Originality/value

The model proposed is novel and raises the important issue of appropriate OS success indicators. New propositions are made regarding relationships between learning sources and domains with these success indicators. This testable model is a valuable resource for researchers. Further, for managers, whether newcomers themselves or responsible for newcomers, the model provides a framework for considering what they are aiming to achieve and how they might get there.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Neil Anderson and Vivian Shackleton

Most managers would agree that the calibre ofan organisation′s employees is vital to its businesssuccess. However, to many managers, selectionis a headache: job…

Abstract

Most managers would agree that the calibre of an organisation′s employees is vital to its business success. However, to many managers, selection is a headache: job descriptions have to be written, advertisements placed, a shortlist of candidates agreed, assessments of candidates carried out, and a final decision reached. The process is time‐consuming, costly and an unwanted interruption of critical business activities. Throughout the 1980s, many advances have been made in personnel selection by occupational psychologists in the US, Canada and Europe. Unfortunately, the substantial developments have not been taken up by many practising managers in Britain. This article attempts to review and summarise the critical trends and themes in the advances in systematic staff selection over recent years.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Neil Anderson, Gillian Hardy and Michael West

Describes how the National Health Service management has respondedto pressure for change as a “critical case site” forinvestigation of the importance of innovativeness…

Abstract

Describes how the National Health Service management has responded to pressure for change as a “critical case site” for investigation of the importance of innovativeness. What factors help or hinder innovation? What distinguishes highly innovative teams? How does the process of innovation develop over time? What practical recommendations can be made to facilitate innovation? Identifies four significant factors: vision, participative safety, a climate for excellence, and support for innovation. Describes a programme of recommended practical interventions.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Filip Lievens, Karen van Dam and Neil Anderson

The aim of this article is to identify recent developments in personnel selection and to review existing research with regard to these recent developments. To this end, 26…

Abstract

The aim of this article is to identify recent developments in personnel selection and to review existing research with regard to these recent developments. To this end, 26 human resource representatives were asked to list current or future trends in personnel selection. In addition, existing academic reviews of recent research in personnel selection were scrutinized. As a result, the following four main trends are identified: labour market shortages, technological developments, applicant perceptions of selection procedures, and construct‐driven approaches. Per trend, relevant existing research is reviewed and avenues for future research are discussed.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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