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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Neil A. Morgan

Focuses on the perceptions held by organisational clients of thelegal advice provided by their primary law firms. Previous work onservice quality has been dominated by…

Abstract

Focuses on the perceptions held by organisational clients of the legal advice provided by their primary law firms. Previous work on service quality has been dominated by studies in consumer services and has been primarily outside the professional service context which is examined here. Empirical data collected from 152 corporate clients across a number of business sectors is used to examine a number of hypotheses relating client quality perceptions to key factors exhibited by both the legal service provider and the organisational client. The relationship between marketing and quality, and the marketing implications of the study for law firms are also discussed.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1989

Neil A. Morgan

Complexity and uncertainty have increasingly become the keyelements in the operating environment for UK financial services firms inthe last decade. These environmental…

Abstract

Complexity and uncertainty have increasingly become the key elements in the operating environment for UK financial services firms in the last decade. These environmental pressures have pushed financial services organisations into developing marketing information and research strategies which will help them restore some stability to their business. The emerging marketing information and research strategies amongst the largest UK financial services companies are illustrated and the implications for the marketing research industry both now and in the future are examined.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 7 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Neil A. Morgan and Douglas W. Vorhies

The marketing literature indicates that a firm’s organizational culture plays a critical role in determining its market orientation (MO) and thereby the firm’s ability to…

Abstract

Purpose

The marketing literature indicates that a firm’s organizational culture plays a critical role in determining its market orientation (MO) and thereby the firm’s ability to successfully adapt to its environment to achieve superior business performance. However, our understanding of the organizational culture of market-oriented firms and its relationship with business performance remains limited in a number of important ways. Drawing on the behavioral theory of the firm and the competing values theory perspective on organizational culture, our empirical study addresses important knowledge gaps concerning the relationship between firm MO culture, MO behaviors, innovation, customer satisfaction, and business performance.

Methodology/approach

We used a survey methodology with Clan Cultural Orientation, Adhocracy Cultural Orientation, Market Cultural Orientation, and Hierarchy Cultural Orientation Clan. Market Orientation Behaviors, Innovation, and Customer Satisfaction and CFROA t (Net Operating Income + Depreciation and AmortizationDisposal of Assets)/Total Assets.

Findings

The overall fit of the first Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) containing the three MO behavior sub-scales, the four organizational culture scales, and the innovation and satisfaction performance measures was good with a χ 2 = 760.89, 524 df, p < 0.001; CFI = 0.916 and RMSEA = 0.055. The overall fit of the second CFA containing the business strategy, bureaucracy, and customer expectations control variables was also good with a χ 2 = 243.26, 156 df, p < 0.001; CFI = 0.937 and RMSEA = 0.061. We also subsequently ran a third CFA in which the MO behavior construct was modeled as a second-order factor comprising the three first-order sub-scales (generation of market intelligence, dissemination of market intelligence, and responsiveness to market intelligence) each of which in turn arose from the relevant survey indicants. This measurement model also fit well with the data with a χ 2 = 84.06, 63 df, p < 0.039; CFI = 0.955 and RMSEA = 0.047. Regressions using seemingly unrelated regressions (SUR) with control variables and with R 2 values ranging from 0.28 to 0.54.

Practical implications

MO culture has an important direct effect on firms’ financial performance as well as an indirect effect via MO behaviors and innovations. Importantly, our findings suggest that MO culture facilitates value-creating behaviors above and beyond those identified in the marketing literature as MO behaviors. In contrast to a series of studies by Deshpandé and colleagues (1993, 1999, 2000, 2004), our empirical results suggest the value of the internally oriented Clan and to a lesser degree Hierarchy cultural orientations as well as the more externally oriented Adhocracy and Market cultural orientations. The benchmark ideal MO culture profile we identify is consistent with organization theory conceptualizations of strong balanced organizational cultures in which each of the four competing values orientations is simultaneously exhibited to a significant degree (e.g., Cameron & Freeman, 1991). Our findings indicate that the organizational culture domain of MO appears to be at least as important (if not more so) in explaining firm performance and suggest that researchers need to re-visit the conceptualization, and perhaps more importantly the operationalization, of MO as a central construct in strategic marketing thought.

Originality/value

In building an MO culture, an important first step is to assess the firm’s existing organizational culture profile (e.g., Goodman, Zammuto, & Gifford, 2001). Organization theory researchers have developed competing values theory-based organizational culture assessment tools that can provide managers with an easily accessible mechanism for accomplishing this (Cameron & Quinn, 1999). The profile of the firm’s existing culture and the profile of the ideal culture for MO from our study can then be plotted on a “spider’s web” graphical representation (e.g., Hooijberg & Petrock, 1993). This aids the comparison of the firm’s existing cultural profile with the ideal MO profile, enabling managers to easily diagnose the areas, direction, and magnitude MO culture profile “gaps” in their firm (Cameron, 1997). Specific gap-closing plans and tactics for gaps on each of the four cultural orientations can then be identified as part of the development of a change management program designed to create an MO culture profile (e.g., Chang & Wiebe, 1996). Cameron and Quinn’s (1999) workbook provides managers with an excellent operational resource for planning and undertaking such gap-closing organizational culture change initiatives.

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Innovation and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-828-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Neil A. Morgan and Nigel F. Piercy

Suggests that strategic planning offers managers the tools to copewith complex, changing environments and to shape organizationalresponses. However, points out that…

Abstract

Suggests that strategic planning offers managers the tools to cope with complex, changing environments and to shape organizational responses. However, points out that experience and research suggests that, frequently, these potential benefits have not been achieved. Out of the common disillusionment and cynicism about planning, identifies ten principles for actively and creatively managing the process of planning to achieve the goals sought from strategic plans.

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Management Decision, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Nigel F. Piercy, David W. Cravens and Neil A. Morgan

Reports a study of sales management in UK companies, which explores the relationship between behaviour‐based control systems and outcome‐based control systems. Although…

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Abstract

Reports a study of sales management in UK companies, which explores the relationship between behaviour‐based control systems and outcome‐based control systems. Although conventional theory has suggested that behaviour performance and outcome performance result from different stimuli, we find that behaviour‐based control is positively associated with both behaviour performance and outcome performance. We find also that organizational commitment and sales territory design are significantly related to salesforce performance. This suggests a number of important avenues for improving salesforce performance. These findings and the growing emphasis on building long‐term, collaborative buyer‐seller relationships favour the use of behaviour‐based control systems in many sales management situations, and suggest a new agenda for management attention in improving salesforce effectiveness.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 32 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Nigel F. Piercy, David W. Cravens and Neil A. Morgan

The significance of the search for sales organization effectiveness is underlined by the major costs represented by the field salesforce for many organizations, and it is…

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5331

Abstract

The significance of the search for sales organization effectiveness is underlined by the major costs represented by the field salesforce for many organizations, and it is heightened by the pressures of global competition and new challenges to develop long‐term customer relationships as the foundation for competitive and sustainable marketing strategies. A study of sales management in British companies adds to an emerging research stream by identifying certain characteristics of superior performance and effectiveness in the business‐to‐business sales organization. We find that conventional measures of salesforce size, call‐rates, costs and productivity reveal relatively little about the differences between more effective and less effective sales organizations and may be dangerously misleading. The hallmarks of effective sales organizations we found to be: balanced compensation strategy; successful salesperson characteristics, in terms of motivation, customer orientation, team orientation, and sales support orientation; high performance in the drivers of sales effectiveness, i.e. sales presentation, technical knowledge, but most particularly adaptiveness, teamwork, sales planning, and sales support; the use of behaviour‐based control approaches involving effective monitoring, directing, evaluating and rewarding activities by sales managers; and, sound organizational structures. The research findings contribute benchmarks to a powerful management agenda to be addressed by executives in pursuing sales organization effectiveness.

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Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2538

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Ruth N. Bolton and Crina O. Tarasi

Abstract

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Abstract

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Marketing in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-339-1

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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Abstract

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Innovation and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-828-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Gordon H.G. McDougall and Terrence J. Levesqu

Effective segmentation is a challenge for financial service managers.Investigates the use of service quality, convenience, andcompetitiveness as a basis for benefit…

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2903

Abstract

Effective segmentation is a challenge for financial service managers. Investigates the use of service quality, convenience, and competitiveness as a basis for benefit segmentation. Identifies two segments, a performance driven segment that in the retail bank sector is primarily interested in having the bank “get it right the first time” and a convenience driven segment that wants location. An important benefit for both segments was competitive rates. Results indicate that the segments differ with respect to evaluation of their main financial institution and satisfaction levels.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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