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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Lauren S. Simon, Emily S. Corwin, Jacqueline Tilton and Denise Breaux Soignet

Negotiation is important for career success. Therefore, this study draws from social expectancy and self-regulation theories to develop a model proposing that social class…

Abstract

Purpose

Negotiation is important for career success. Therefore, this study draws from social expectancy and self-regulation theories to develop a model proposing that social class background (SCB) influences the ease with which achievement striving translates into propensity to negotiate. Specifically, the authors examine how SCB moderates the relationship between achievement striving and negotiation propensity via a key mediator—status-based identity uncertainty—reflective of one's (un)certainty about their societal standing.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data across three surveys over a four-week period from 460 participants. The authors assessed negotiation propensity by asking participants to rank-order behavioral reactions, representative of different degrees of negotiation engagement, in response to three scenarios.

Findings

The positive effects of achievement striving on negotiation propensity are attenuated for individuals with lower SCBs, in part, because achievement-oriented individuals with lower SCBs experience a heightened sense of status-based identity uncertainty. Although achievement striving is an asset for initiating negotiations, it appears to disproportionately benefit those with higher SCBs.

Originality/value

Individuals higher in achievement striving and with lower SCBs may approach the negotiation process differently than those with higher SCBs. This dynamic serves as another mechanism through which cumulative (dis)advantage processes in career success may occur over time.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2022

Zhiyong Li, Jiahui Huang, Songshan (Sam) Huang and Dan Huang

This study aims to understand Chinese consumers’ perceived barriers to using peer-to-peer (P2P) accommodation before and after the outbreak of COVID-19 and the negotiation

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand Chinese consumers’ perceived barriers to using peer-to-peer (P2P) accommodation before and after the outbreak of COVID-19 and the negotiation strategies they applied in overcoming the barriers and enabling consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research design with 28 semi-structured interviews was used. Data were analysed by content analysis.

Findings

Five psychological barriers and four functional barriers were found to inhibit consumers from using P2P accommodation both before and after the COVID-19 outbreak. In overcoming the perceived barriers, consumers applied both behavioural negotiation strategies, including seeking information, behavioural adaptation, selective choice and seeking social support, and cognitive negotiation strategies, including cognitive adaptation and trusting agents. COVID-19 was found to serve as both a barrier and a facilitator for using P2P accommodation. A barriers–negotiation framework was developed in the context.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretically, this study advances consumer resistance and perceived barriers literature by integrating negotiation and developing a barriers–negotiation framework of P2P accommodation usage. This study also offers insights for practitioners in the P2P accommodation industry.

Originality/value

This study showcases the role of negotiation in understanding barriers to using P2P accommodation, paving the way to extend relevant knowledge to advance consumer resistance research, which is an emerging topic in the broader management domain.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

Sergio Koc‐Menard

The purpose of this paper is to explore how negotiation teams can rely on social networks to enhance their performance at the table.

3327

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how negotiation teams can rely on social networks to enhance their performance at the table.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the impact of social relations on team performance in the negotiation task. It conducts a selective review and integration of negotiation, small group and social network research.

Findings

The paper's main argument is that teams can rely on social relations to locate and get hold of resources that will augment their ability to manage the bargaining process. To tap into the value of social networks, teams need to look beyond their internal processes and develop strategies that actively manage their environment. The paper examines three such strategies: membership change, knowledge acquisition, and ambassadorial activity.

Originality/value

The paper outlines a relational approach to team negotiation. This approach has the potential to improve team negotiation practice by opening up a new way to design and manage negotiation teams.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Stephen Ashcroft

This paper explores commercial negotiation skills in the context of the buying/selling dynamics using the writer's experience as a Lead Negotiator. Planning, conducting…

12690

Abstract

This paper explores commercial negotiation skills in the context of the buying/selling dynamics using the writer's experience as a Lead Negotiator. Planning, conducting and analysing the outcomes of commercial negotiations are key elements of successful business. Developing the skills of commercial negotiation is a demanding, valuable and often personally challenging task. The outcomes of commercial negotiation are often difficult to assess; such as the impact on the short‐ and long‐term buyer/seller relationship and the negotiator's personal and organizational development, hence the need to identify, understand and develop commercial negotiation skills. Commercial negotiation is explored from three perspectives; process, the respective parties' objectives and bargaining. The need for planning, the foundation of any process, in a commercial negotiation is detailed. A typology of techniques of persuasion is introduced and briefly explained.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

José Garson and Jenny Quillien

Views Game Theory, as a long‐time companion model and guide for theexploration of negotiations, as having not only reached its limits but,perhaps, as having become…

Abstract

Views Game Theory, as a long‐time companion model and guide for the exploration of negotiations, as having not only reached its limits but, perhaps, as having become counter‐productive in the search for greater understanding and skill. Suggests that a more powerful heuristic model may be available by turning to the current work on learning organizations. Suggests that by borrowing some of the basic concepts developed by C. Argyris and D. Schön, and considering negotiations as learning organizations, we allow ourselves to move from the analytical mode of Game Theory to a more synthetic approach. The synthetic approach allows us to distinguish more carefully between simple and difficult negotiations and to rethink success and failure. It also allows us to account more adequately for such phenomena as the preliminary negotiations to negotiate, the role of form, and the significance of the links between negotiator and home base. The pressing reality of current events in both international politics and business certainly should incite us to give serious consideration to this more operational model.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 93 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

R.E. Fells

There is a growing literature on negotiation, much of which is directed towards negotiations which take place in the industrial relations context. However, negotiation is…

3614

Abstract

There is a growing literature on negotiation, much of which is directed towards negotiations which take place in the industrial relations context. However, negotiation is a practical activity and there is a need to bridge the gap between the thoeretical framework of the negotiation process and the appropriate application of particular negotiating techniques. One approach is to present an explanatory framework in terms of the motivation of one's negotiating opponent, usually relying on Maslow's hierarchy of needs. These authors then present a series of semi‐anecdotal descriptions of tactics to employ. Such an approach does not fully present any underlying principles to be grasped by negotiators, nor does it form a basis for the training of negotiating techniques.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Ray Fells

An earlier article in this journal outlined a model of the process of negotiation with particular reference to negotiation in the industrial relations context. The model…

2084

Abstract

An earlier article in this journal outlined a model of the process of negotiation with particular reference to negotiation in the industrial relations context. The model suggests that negotiations go through five phases or patterns of negotiating activity as the negotiators move through to a settlement. On the basis of the model, it is possible to identify several implications for negotiators, and, in particular, to make the point that the two parties must jointly manage their progress through the negotiations. Within the negotiation process there are three potential deadlocks which could emerge to obstruct this progress if the negotiations were not properly and jointly managed. This article develops the concept of deadlocks in negotiation more fully, and attempts to identify the implications for negotiators by suggesting how deadlocks might be identified and overcome.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2022

Kyriaki Fousiani, Kiki Margaretha Maria De Jonge and Georgios Michelakis

The literature regarding the effect of power on negotiation strategies remains scattered and inconsistent. This study aims to propose that the effect of power on…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature regarding the effect of power on negotiation strategies remains scattered and inconsistent. This study aims to propose that the effect of power on negotiation strategies is contingent on contextual variables but also on individual differences among negotiators. Specifically, the authors hypothesize that creativity moderates the effect of power such that low-power, as compared to high-power negotiators, use more collaborative and less competitive strategies and further report lower fixed-pie perception (i.e. perception of a counterpart’s goals and interests as diametrically opposite to one’s own goals and interests) when they can be creative. Moreover, the authors hypothesize that negotiators’ age buffers the moderated effect of power.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted two experiments and a cross-sectional field study. Participants in Studies 1 and 2 played a negotiation game in dyads. Study 1 manipulated power as status (manager vs employee), whereas Study 2 manipulated power as Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement (i.e. power to exit the negotiation without a deal). Accordingly, participants in Study 2 had strong vs weak Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement. In both studies, power was manipulated within dyads. Moreover, in both studies, the authors manipulated creativity (high vs low) between dyads. The chronological age of negotiators was measured in both studies and served as an additional moderator. Study 3 (preregistered) aimed to replicate the experiment results in the field.

Findings

Study 1 provided partial support for the hypothesis about collaborative strategies. Study 2 fully supported the hypothesis about the role of power and creativity on FPP and on collaboration (but not on competition). Study 3 did not support the power by creativity hypothesis. Interestingly, Studies 1 and 2 supported the power × creativity × age interaction hypothesis when predicting collaboration, while Study 3 supported the three-way interaction when predicting competition. Furthermore, Study 2 provided full support for the three-way interaction hypothesis when predicting FPP, while Study 3 provided partial support for this hypothesis. Altogether, the three studies largely replicated and complemented each other and revealed the robustness of the examined effects.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this research extend the literature on power on the one hand and negotiation and conflict management on the other and shed light on the inconsistent results regarding the role of power in collaboration and competition (De Dreu, 1995; De Dreu and Van Kleef, 2004; Overbeck and Park, 2001; Overbeck et al., 2006). Additionally, this research reconciles the inconsistent literature on creativity, conflict management and prosocial behavior (Gino and Ariely, 2012; Gino and Wiltermuth, 2014; Wilson and Thompson, 2014). Finally, the findings touch upon the aging literature as well and shed light on the role of age on conflict management (for a review, see Beitler et al., 2018) and on the interconnection between age, power and creativity.

Practical implications

The findings are relevant to organizations characterized by power asymmetries (e.g. employee/manager) and inform practitioners about the main determinants of collaboration-based negotiations at work.

Social implications

The findings extend the literature on power on the one hand and negotiation and conflict management on the other and shed light on the inconsistent results regarding the role of power in collaboration and competition.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study investigating the moderating role of creativity in the relationship between negotiation power and negotiation strategies. Moreover, the moderating role of participant age in such relationships has been, to date, largely uninvestigated.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2022

Sandra Haggenmüller, Patricia Oehlschläger, Uta Herbst and Markus Voeth

This study aims to provide probable future developments in the form of holistic scenarios for business negotiations. In recent years, negotiation research did not put a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide probable future developments in the form of holistic scenarios for business negotiations. In recent years, negotiation research did not put a lot of emphasis on external changes. Consequently, current challenges and trends are scarcely integrated, making it difficult to support negotiation practice perspectively.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies the structured, multi-method approach of scenario analysis. To examine the future space of negotiations, this combines qualitative and quantitative measures to base our analysis on negotiation experts’ assessments, estimations and visions of the negotiation future.

Findings

The results comprise an overview of five negotiation scenarios in the year 2030 and of their individual drivers. The five revealed scenarios are: digital intelligence, business as usual, powerful network – the route to collaboration, powerful network – the route to predominance and system crash.

Originality/value

The scenario analysis is a suitable approach that enables to relate various factors of the negotiation environment to negotiations themselves and allows an examination of future changes in buyer–seller negotiations and the creation of possible future scenarios. The identified scenarios provide an orientation for business decisions in the field of negotiation.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Jacqueline Y. Sánchez-García and Carlos López-Hernández

This chapter introduces the negotiagram as a tool that contributes to the study of the negotiation process. The negotiagram is a construct that facilitates an…

Abstract

This chapter introduces the negotiagram as a tool that contributes to the study of the negotiation process. The negotiagram is a construct that facilitates an understanding of interactions between negotiators and their temporal context. Given that the negotiation process can be seen as a system, system dynamics (SD) are used to explore the interactions and complexities in the proposed construct, especially when it comes to circumstances with a high degree of uncertainty, such as an economic crisis or disruptive innovation in the industry. The results suggest that the causal configurations that SD establish lead to non-linear relationships and feedback loops that direct behavior within negotiation, an understanding that further leads stakeholders to a holistic vision and the opportunity to change, manage, and control a negotiation as a system.

Details

Strategy, Power and CSR: Practices and Challenges in Organizational Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-973-6

Keywords

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