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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Dong‐Geun Oh

This study aims to investigate the influences of the selected antecedents on each type of complaining intentions and its relationship to complaining behavior of 582…

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1710

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the influences of the selected antecedents on each type of complaining intentions and its relationship to complaining behavior of 582 university library users in South Korea.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a survey, using a convenience sample of 582 dissatisfied university library users from five major universities located in Taegu Metropolitan City and Kyoung‐pook Province in South Korea. The sample was proportionate to general users in the university libraries in these areas.

Findings

Perceived severity of dissatisfaction and personal norms had significant influences on the choice of negative word‐of‐mouth intention, direct and indirect voice intentions, and third‐party complaint intention. Societal benefits had significant influences on the choice of exit, negative word‐of‐mouth intention, and direct and indirect voice intentions. Difficulty of complaining and service importance had significant influences on negative word‐of‐mouth intention, and likelihood of success had significant influences on the direct and indirect voice intentions. There were significant relationships between experiences of doing the same types of complaining behavior before and the same types of complaining intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This study was exploratory inorder to separate complaining intentions from the complaining behavior itself. Some variables, including external attribution and loyalty, which were not proved to be critical variables for complaining intentions, need to be investigated further to investigate whether or not they can be a useful variable for complaining behavior and intentions of academic library users. Some results from this study did not confirm the results of the study on the public library users that measured the complaint behavior and intentions together. Compared with the results of the study on the public library users, the values of adjusted R square in the regression of each dependent variables were much higher in this study except for the case of exit intention.

Practical implications

This study proved that the complaining intention model, separated from complaining behavior, could successfully be applied to academic library services.

Originality/value

Opines that feedback information through complaints can solve many problems and/or improve performance and service quality – and eventually help libraries satisfy their customers.

Details

Library Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2017

Birgit Leisen Pollack

The purpose of this study is to contrast the effects of four exit barriers on word of mouth activities. Monetary, service loss, social and convenience exit barriers are…

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1816

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to contrast the effects of four exit barriers on word of mouth activities. Monetary, service loss, social and convenience exit barriers are compared. The differential effects of these four barriers on the valence of word of mouth (positive, negative), the type of word of mouth recipient (weak tie, strong tie) and the motives (catharsis, company sabotage) for spreading word of mouth are studied.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for empirically addressing a set of hypotheses were collected from 185 consumers. The hypotheses were analyzed using ANOVA models along with post hoc tests.

Findings

The results suggest that the type of exit barrier matters. Exit barriers, with respect to word of mouth activities, seem to fall on a continuum. On one extreme, the most detrimental barriers are monetary hurdles, and on the other end, the least detrimental barriers are convenience hurdles. Monetary barriers are responsible for the most negative word of mouth and company sabotage. Social and convenience barriers lead to significantly less.

Practical implications

The implications for erecting exit barriers are discussed. In particular, the value of monetary barriers is questioned. The benefits of such involuntary customer retention methods may be offset by the sabotage they invite through negative word of mouth.

Originality/value

The paper provides insights into word of mouth activities of dissatisfied customers that are trapped by various exit barriers. The word of mouth activities investigated include valence, recipient type and motives. The study contrasts monetary, service loss, social and convenience exit barriers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2017

Rajat Roy and Vik Naidoo

This paper aims to investigate the direct and interactive effects of regulatory focus (promotion versus prevention), attribute type (search versus experience) and word of

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1485

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the direct and interactive effects of regulatory focus (promotion versus prevention), attribute type (search versus experience) and word of mouth valence (positive versus negative) on consumption decision for a service and a product.

Design/methodology/approach

Three empirical studies (two laboratories and a field experiment) using “university” and “mobile phone” as the research setting were used to test the key hypotheses.

Findings

Promotion (prevention)-focused subjects preferred experience (search) attributes over their counterparts while making consumption decision. This preference was further reinforced for both promotion and prevention-focused people under positive word of mouth. Under negative word of mouth, in comparison to their counterparts, promotion-focused people still retained their preference for experience attributes, whereas prevention-focused subjects reversed their preference and maintained status quo.

Research limitations/implications

Future research may validate and extend authors’ findings by looking into the underlying process or studying additional word of mouth variables that may moderate the current findings.

Practical implications

The findings will help managers devise a range of marketing strategies in the areas of advertising and product positioning, especially for products/services that are showcased in terms of experience and search attributes.

Originality/value

The current research is novel as no prior research has proposed and tested the two-way interaction between regulatory focus and search/experience attributes, or its further moderation by word of mouth valence.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

W. Timothy Coombs and Sherry J. Holladay

The purpose of this research is to present a study designed to test if anger is a mediator in the relationship between crisis responsibility and negative word‐of‐mouth and…

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7104

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to present a study designed to test if anger is a mediator in the relationship between crisis responsibility and negative word‐of‐mouth and crisis responsibility and purchase intention. Emphasizes the relationship between anger, crisis responsibility, and intended negative word‐of‐mouth, what we call the negative communication dynamic. Researchers have just begun to explore the role of affect in crisis communication by linking it to behavioral intentions and proving that crisis affect is largely a function of crisis responsibility (perceived organizational responsibility for the crisis).

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental design is used to test for the mediator relationship. The design reflects the study's theoretical link to Attribution Theory.

Findings

The results support that anger is a moderator in the relationship between crisis responsibility and intended negative word‐of‐mouth and between crisis responsibility and purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should examine how crisis response strategies can be used to lessen anger and to reduce the likelihood of the negative communication dynamic.

Practical implications

Crisis managers can use the cues for estimating crisis responsibility to determine anger because of the strong correlation between the two variables. Crisis managers should engage in words and actions designed to reduce the anger and reduce the likelihood of the negative communication dynamic.

Originality/value

This paper provides novel insight into the role and value of anger in crisis communication.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Olavo Pinto and Amélia Brandão

The purpose of this study is to place the antecedents and consequences of brand hate in the context of negative consumer–brand relationship in the telecommunication…

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2599

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to place the antecedents and consequences of brand hate in the context of negative consumer–brand relationship in the telecommunication industry. It provides a response to the existing gap in the research on brand hate in consumer behavior in service brands.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey-based data was modeled after theory that aims to apply concepts to the telecommunications industry. With a solid model grounded and context-adapted, a mediation analysis of the role of brand hate in negative antecedents and consequences toward brands was performed.

Findings

Brand hate was found to mediate all the negative relationships proposed, while showing to be especially significant in mediating negative word of mouth. This model appropriately fits the services' marketing brand and revealed new insights into the function of brand hate in negative relationships that are specific to service marketing consumer brands.

Research limitations/implications

Branding theory may benefit from deeper insights into the negative side of consumer–brand relationships. A broader illustration of its constituents in different industries and the recovery of the management approach to these circumstances bring innovation and a richer understanding, specially to the role of brand hate in the mediation context as seen in the literature (Hegner et al., 2017; Zarantonello et al., 2016)

Practical implications

Managerial implications include assessing brands in analyzing and relating to different emotions and concepts from customers, allowing to prioritize and mapping the customer relationship touchpoints.

Originality/value

The present study presents a first insight of brand hate in the context of the service industry of telecommunications in southern Europe while testing brand hate as a mediator involving negative predictors leading to negative outcomes in consumer–brand relationships.

Details

European Journal of Management and Business Economics, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2444-8451

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Chow Hou Wee, Seek Luan Lim and May Lwin

Word‐of‐mouth is a powerful communication tool which is often beyond the control of the marketer. This study used a 3 x 2 x 2 factorial experiment in a laboratory…

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1432

Abstract

Word‐of‐mouth is a powerful communication tool which is often beyond the control of the marketer. This study used a 3 x 2 x 2 factorial experiment in a laboratory simulation to examine the main and interaction effects of three independent variables — message, source and user‐type — on credibility and behavior intention. The experiment involved 1,440 respondents from two different demographic sample groupings — secondary school students and undergraduates. ANOVA results for the experiments showed that, generally, source and user‐type were found to be significant factors affecting the credibility of word‐of‐mouth. In terms of source, father was perceived to be more credible than close friend as a word‐of‐mouth source. Likewise, past users were found to be more credible than non‐past users. Message was, however, found to affect significantly the behavioral intention variable. Negative message was found to generate the strongest negative behavioral intention than positive message and two‐sided messages. Two‐sided message was also found to have a stronger effect than positive message in behavioral intention. In addition, t‐tests results also revealed significant differences in perceptions between the two samples.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 7 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Amod S. Athavale, Benjamin F. Banahan, III, John P. Bentley and Donna S. West-Strum

– This paper aims to identify antecedents and consequences of pharmacy loyalty behavior.

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1373

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify antecedents and consequences of pharmacy loyalty behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was conducted. Constructs involved were measured using an online self-administered questionnaire. Data were analyzed using multivariate logistic and linear regression.

Findings

In all, 400 usable responses were obtained. General satisfaction (odds ratio [OR] = 1.52; p < 0.01; 95 per cent confidence interval [CI] = 1.12 to 2.06) and trust (OR = 1.81; p < 0.01; 95 per cent CI = 1.32 to 2.50) were found to have statistically significant relationships with loyalty behavior. General satisfaction (regression coefficient = 0.20; p < 0.01; 95 per cent CI = 0.09 to 0.31), explanation component of satisfaction with service quality (regression coefficient = 0.13; p < 0.01; 95 per cent CI = 0.04 to 0.21), consideration and technical competence components of satisfaction with service quality (regression coefficient = 0.18; p = 0.02; 95 per cent CI = 0.03 to 0.33) and trust (regression coefficient = 0.33; p < 0.01; 95 per cent CI = 0.21 to 0.45) were statistically significantly related to positive word-of-mouth promotion. General satisfaction (regression coefficient = −0.29; p < 0.01; 95 per cent CI = −0.3 to −0.18), consideration and technical competence components of satisfaction with service quality (regression coefficient = −0.17; p = 0.02; 95 per cent CI = −0.31 to −0.03) and trust (regression coefficient = −0.21; p < 0.01; 95 per cent CI = −0.33 to −0.10) had statistically significant relationships with negative word-of-mouth promotion.

Research limitations/implications

Pharmacists can utilize these results to develop better marketing strategies. These results can be used by researchers to forward this area of research. This study had some study design limitations that may affect its generalizability.

Originality/value

Effect of satisfaction as a multidimensional construct on pharmacy loyalty behavior and word-of-mouth promotion, identification of drivers of negative word-of-mouth promotion and effect of pharmacy trust on pharmacy loyalty behavior and word-of-mouth promotion are some of the major contributions of this study.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2019

Ilaria Baghi and Veronica Gabrielli

Previous research on brand crisis has introduced the difference between a values-related crisis and a performance-related crisis. However, little remains known regarding…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research on brand crisis has introduced the difference between a values-related crisis and a performance-related crisis. However, little remains known regarding consumers’ varying negative responses towards these two different types of brand misconduct. This paper aims to investigate and compare consumers’ affective and behavioural negative reactions (i.e. negative word of mouth and purchase intention) towards a faulty brand during a values-related crisis and a performance-related crisis by testing the mediation of negative emotions and introducing the moderating role of cultural belongingness (collectivistic vs individualistic).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested a model of moderated mediation in a cross-cultural investigation on a sample of 229 Italian and Asian consumers. The study is a 2 (cultures: collectivistic vs individualistic) × 2 (crisis: performance-related vs values-related) between-subjects experimental design. The moderated mediation model shows that consumers’ negative reactions (negative word of mouth and negative purchase intention) towards a faulty brand involved in different crisis typologies is explained by the mediating role of negative emotions, and that this mediation depends on a consumer’s cultural belongingness.

Findings

The results suggest that consumers belonging to a collectivistic culture (e.g. Asian culture) tend to react in a more severe and strict manner when faced with a values-related brand crisis event then when faced with a performance-related crisis. The arousal of negative emotion towards a brand represents the mediating variable in behavioural responses (i.e. negative word of mouth and purchase intention).

Originality/value

The present study extends current knowledge in the field of consumers’ negative response to brand irresponsibility behaviours while introducing the role of crisis typology and cultural belongingness. In particular, individualistic people are more sensitive to a values-related crisis in comparison with a performance-related one. The findings of this study have strong managerial implications for defining effective response strategies to negative events involving brands in different markets.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Lloyd C. Harris and Emmanuel Ogbonna

The aim of this article is to supply grounded empirical insights into the forms of negative word‐of‐mouth by front‐line, customer contact employees.

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4188

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to supply grounded empirical insights into the forms of negative word‐of‐mouth by front‐line, customer contact employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The article adopts a qualitative approach through interviews with 54 front‐line employees in three retail organizations: food, clothing and electronic goods.

Findings

The paper finds four different forms of negative word‐of‐mouth behaviours which are labelled customer‐oriented, anti‐management/firm, employee‐oriented and anti‐competitor word‐of‐mouth. The paper shows how each of these behaviours varied in terms of the target audience (the intended listeners), the focus of attention (the focal point of comments), the motivation (the perceived rationale for the behaviour) and the extent to which employees perceived their own comments to be truthful.

Research limitations/implications

The article calls for an expansion of research horizon to incorporate a fuller understanding of the dynamics of employee (mis)behaviour in the workplace in relation to resistance, subjectivity, instrumentality and clandestine control of certain aspects of workplace dynamics.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that managers should be concerned with front‐line employee negative word‐of‐mouth especially because some of the examples which were uncovered are potentially damaging to both financial and non financial performance measures.

Originality/value

The article contributes insights into the neglected area of employee negative word‐of‐mouth. The article argues that the identification of the forms of employee negative word‐of‐mouth is an important step towards developing a theory of employee negative word‐of‐mouth that is especially pertinent to front‐line service work. The article develops a series of propositions which future researchers may find useful in advancing research in this area.

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Wen-Hai Chih, Tao-Sheng Chiu, Li-Chi Lan and Wen-Chang Fang

This study aims to investigate the relationships between consumers’ perceived justice and their behavioral intentions and explores the effects of psychological contract…

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1940

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationships between consumers’ perceived justice and their behavioral intentions and explores the effects of psychological contract violation on the relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducts sampling through the survey to consumers after restaurant dining. This study collected data from 400 respondents and analyzed the data with the structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that consumers who experience higher level of distribution justice and procedure justice are more likely to have behavioral intentions. This study also reveals that psychological contract violation is a partial mediator of the above relationships. Consumers will feel less psychological contract violation when they perceive more distribution justice and procedure justice and will not significantly affect them more likely to repurchase intention.

Originality/value

During restaurant service, if consumers feel distribution or procedure injustice, they are more likely to engage in negative word-of-mouth. However, the lack of significant and positive effect of interaction justice on negative word-of-mouth in this study can be because of other intervening variables, such as intensity. Furthermore, in terms of customer’s repurchase intention, the results indicate significant and positive effects for all three types of justice on repurchase intention.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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