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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Alfonso Mendoza-Velazquez, José Antonio Santillana, Viviana Elizabeth Zárate-Mirón and Martha Cabanas

The purpose of this study is to investigate labor congestion in the automotive industry in Mexico.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate labor congestion in the automotive industry in Mexico.

Design/methodology/approach

By using the cluster and subcluster definitions by Delgado et al. (2016) and relying on an efficiency and production function perspective, this study estimates a standard production function and measures marginal returns of labor at the regional cluster and subclusters levels. To assess whether wages affect the finding of congestion and productivity, the model also measures the individual impact of wages on both total productivity and marginal returns of labor.

Findings

Among other results, this paper finds evidence of labor congestion in the automotive cluster in Mexico. This congestion deepens with wages and it is specific to some regions and some subclusters.

Research limitations/implications

The methods used are based on panel data techniques but are fundamentally cross-section in nature. The time period available may condition these findings.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study reporting congestion in the automotive cluster in Mexico.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1977

Linda Wiper and David Longbottom

INTRODUCTION With the increasing importance of capital investment selection in modern business the field has attracted a large body of interest in the literature of the…

Abstract

INTRODUCTION With the increasing importance of capital investment selection in modern business the field has attracted a large body of interest in the literature of the last two decades. It is the purpose of the survey to trace this development from the use of simple financial criteria for assessing investments to the use of more sophisticated financial measures, techniques for assessing risk in investments and finally complex models for selecting portfolios of investments.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Harun Emre Yildiz

Previous theoretical explanations and empirical analyses of the multinationality-performance relationship have produced mixed arguments and results. Linear and curvilinear…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous theoretical explanations and empirical analyses of the multinationality-performance relationship have produced mixed arguments and results. Linear and curvilinear relationships have been theorized and confirmed empirically. This study aims to reconcile earlier mixed findings by incorporating the role of entry mode choice as a moderating variable.

Design/methodology/approach

Extensive literature survey is conducted in order to provide an explanation for the different performance patterns of internationalization via licensing, joint venture and wholly owned subsidiary.

Findings

Based on the assumptions of Transaction Cost Economics and Organizational Capability perspectives, several research propositions about the multinationality-performance relationship are formulated, which provide a more fine-tuned approach to the performance implications of multinationality.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to multinationality-performance debate by showing that the impact of multinationality depends on the firm-level strategies implemented while going international; to be more precise, the net benefits from multinationality are likely to vary for different modes of foreign market entry.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Joseph C. Ofori-Dankwa and Scott Julian

The purpose of this paper is to present a heuristic model to better understand the inherently paradoxical and concomitant positive and negative organizational outcomes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a heuristic model to better understand the inherently paradoxical and concomitant positive and negative organizational outcomes associated with demographic diversity and value congruence in organizations. It further illustrates the resultant organizational dynamics that result from shifting levels of diversity and value congruence.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts the supply and demand heuristic from the economics discipline and further develops the diversity and similarity curves (DSC) model proposed by Ofori-Dankwa and Julian. Further, this analysis is carried out from both short-run (static) and long-run (dynamic) perspectives.

Findings

This study illustrates how different levels of organizational diversity and value congruence (reflected by diversity and similarity curves respectively) could concurrently result in both positive and negative levels of organizational creativity and competitiveness.

Research limitations/implications

As a heuristic, this study's model is a simplistic representation of the inherently complex set of relationships and outcomes that are associated with paradox in a social setting.

Practical implications

This model has managerial utility for explaining how different levels of diversity in an organizational setting could potentially have different positive and negative outcomes.

Originality/value

This study unpacks the implications of different levels of diversity in an organizational setting and sheds original light on the dynamic nature of virtuous and vicious organizational cycles associated with diversity.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Donald J. Mullineaux and Mark K. Pyles

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically the effects of investments by US banks in advertising and promotion on their performance in the areas of profits and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically the effects of investments by US banks in advertising and promotion on their performance in the areas of profits and market share.

Design/methodology/approach

The model presented in the paper is motivated by the theory of the profit function. We estimate a base model with a fixed‐effects panel including an AR(1) disturbance over the period 2002‐2006. To test for selection bias, we also estimate a Heckman model.

Findings

It is found that bank profits and market share increase significantly with increased spending on advertising and promotion. Also, significant evidence is found of increasing returns to scale in this type of marketing expenditure. It is also found that increased expenditures on branching result in higher profits and increased market share, but without scale effects. The results are robust, the inclusion of variables is not suggested by profit function theory and corrected for prospective selection bias.

Originality/value

The extant literature does not include research on the effectiveness of bank marketing from the viewpoint of its impact on profit performance. The findings should be of interest to academics in finance and marketing and to banking practitioners.

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2016

Jaepil Han, Deockhyun Ryu and Robin Sickles

This paper aims to investigate spillover effects of public capital stock in a production function model that accounts for spatial dependencies. In many settings, ignoring…

Abstract

This paper aims to investigate spillover effects of public capital stock in a production function model that accounts for spatial dependencies. In many settings, ignoring spatial dependency yields inefficient, biased and inconsistent estimates in cross country panels. Although there are a number of studies aiming to estimate the output elasticity of public capital stock, many of those fail to reach a consensus on refining the elasticity estimates. We argue that accounting for spillover effects of the public capital stock on the production efficiency and incorporating spatial dependences are crucial. For this purpose, we employ a spatial autoregressive stochastic frontier model based on a number of specifications of the spatial dependency structure. Using the data of 21 OECD countries from 1960 to 2001, we estimate a spatial autoregressive stochastic frontier model and derive the mean indirect marginal effects of public capital stock, which are interpreted as spillover effects. We found that spillover effects can be an important factor explaining variations in technical inefficiency across countries as well as in explaining the discrepancies among various levels of output elasticity of public capital stock in traditional production function approaches.

Details

Spatial Econometrics: Qualitative and Limited Dependent Variables
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-986-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

David E. Allen and Jerry T. Parwada

This paper aims to examine mutual fund investors' response to mergers of Australian mutual fund companies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine mutual fund investors' response to mergers of Australian mutual fund companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Two matching‐control techniques are employed to analyse the impact of mergers on excess money in and out of open and closed funds involved in the transactions. The paper employs cross‐sectional regression analyses to examine the impact of mergers on different types of parties to mergers.

Findings

The results suggest that mergers are not accompanied by increased money flows. Instead investors withdraw from the target funds prior to and after the merger. Funds belonging to specialist mutual fund companies record more gains in assets under management than declines following mergers, and that money inflow gains at competing funds induce reductions of management expense ratios at target funds.

Research limitations/implications

This paper studies mergers in only one industry in a single country. Future studies may extend to other industries and economies.

Originality/value

This paper extends prior research on the flow effects of mergers at individual fund level by considering the issue at the corporate level.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Linea Kjellsdotter Ivert and Patrik Jonsson

Studies conducted on advanced planning and scheduling (APS) systems have found problems in the marginal or negative returns from APS systems when they are implemented in…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies conducted on advanced planning and scheduling (APS) systems have found problems in the marginal or negative returns from APS systems when they are implemented in manufacturing planning and control processes. The purpose of this study is to examine what problems exist in the onward and upward phase of the APS system implementation and how the individual, technical and organizational (ITO) dimensions in the implementation phases influence the problems in the onward and upward phase.

Design/methodology/approach

Three different manufacturing companies using a supply chain planning module to support their tactical manufacturing planning processes were chosen and their APS system implementation phases were studied. Interviews with the project members and the end-users, and on-site visits, were conducted. Internal company data and presentations were collected and analyzed according to four implementation phases and the ITO dimensions.

Findings

Three types of problems were identified in the onward and upward phase: process-related problems concerning difficulties to move forward; dependency on a consultancy firm; and too much time spent in the system. System-related problems include the usage of parallel systems and inadequate usage of the appropriate potential of the APS system. Plan-related problems regard an incorrect production plan. Different relationships between the ITO dimensions in the implementation process and the problem type were proposed.

Practical implications

The relationships identified in this paper are of important knowledge for companies who are implementing, or are in the process of implementing, APS systems.

Originality/value

There has been little written about the implementation issues of APS systems. The practical use of APS systems in the tactical planning is also relatively low. It is not known what problems to expect and how the ITO dimensions influence the problems during implementation. The findings this paper discusses fill some of these gaps.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Morten Jakobsen

The purpose of the paper is to analyse how the intensive use of non-financial performance measures and the lack of an economic reality among Danish farmers have…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to analyse how the intensive use of non-financial performance measures and the lack of an economic reality among Danish farmers have contributed to a low economic performance despite high productivity. The research ambition of the paper is to contribute to a better understanding of the managerial decision-making made by family business managers, in this case farmers, and how these decisions may impact financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a case study including farmers, agricultural consultants and bankers. The analysis uses pragmatic constructivism to analyse the economic reality of the farmers included and the business topos among Danish farmers.

Findings

The main finding of the paper is that the dominating non-financial performance management techniques and a historically based strong emotional emphasis on size and production volume as the main success criteria for being a good farmer have led to a neglect of economic rationality. In addition, this practice has made the farmers blind to alternative possibilities for taking advantage of the resources available. The result has been an un-economic utopian reality.

Originality/value

The paper shows how the use of non-financial performance measures can lead to prolonging of a certain reality perception that may not be economically sustainable. Small family businesses such as family farms are likely to be more exposed to such risk because such businesses are run by a set of values that include more objectives that are more dominating than the profit objective. The paper concludes that family business managers must be open towards inputs from the society around the business, because family businesses may have a tendency to create their own reality that at some point may come in conflict with society of which the family business has to co-exist within.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2017

Joshua S. Gans

In a dynamic environment where underlying competition is “for the market,” this chapter examines what happens when entrants and incumbents can instead negotiate for the…

Abstract

In a dynamic environment where underlying competition is “for the market,” this chapter examines what happens when entrants and incumbents can instead negotiate for the market. For instance, this might arise when an entrant innovator can choose to license to or be acquired by an incumbent firm (i.e., engage in cooperative commercialization). It is demonstrated that, depending upon the level of firms’ potential dynamic capabilities, there may or may not be gains to trade between incumbents and entrants in a cumulative innovation environment; that is, entrants may not be adequately compensated for losses in future innovative potential. This stands in contrast to static analyses that overwhelmingly identify positive gains to trade from such cooperation.

Details

Entrepreneurship, Innovation, and Platforms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-080-8

Keywords

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