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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2021

Bekir Bora Dedeoğlu, Yusuf Karakuş, Caner Çalışkan and Şule Aydın

In this study, the effects of negative tourism impacts, length of residency and nativity on support for tourism development were examined.

Abstract

Purpose

In this study, the effects of negative tourism impacts, length of residency and nativity on support for tourism development were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Because understanding the attitudes of local people toward tourism support is complex, this study employed both symmetric (PLS-SEM) and asymmetric (fsQCA) approaches from a holistic perspective. A total of 336 individuals from Cappadocia, one of Turkey's most prominent tourist destinations, were surveyed.

Findings

According to the symmetric method results, respondents' negative perceptions of tourism negatively affect attitudes toward tourism support. Native-born status acts as a moderating variable in the relationship between attitudes toward tourism support and the negative economic impacts of tourism. On the other hand, this study shows that the complex interactions of nativity and the negative impacts of tourism directly affect local people's attitudes toward tourism support.

Practical implications

This study revealed that practitioners should adopt a comprehensive perspective to understand the attitudes of local people toward tourism support.

Originality/value

This study, in addition to the findings obtained via the symmetric method, reveals the complex interaction of the negative impacts of tourism, thus providing a roadmap to improve local people's attitudes toward tourism support by using asymmetric modeling.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2020

Mauricio Palmeira, Gerri Spassova and Jordi Quoidbach

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether people’s intuitions regarding the social consequences of word of mouth (WOM) match the actual consequences. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether people’s intuitions regarding the social consequences of word of mouth (WOM) match the actual consequences. The authors investigate the expectations people have about how sharing WOM (positive or negative) will change others’ perceptions of them and then compare these expectations to the actual impact of WOM.

Design/methodology/approach

Six studies were conducted. Study 1 predicted how sharing their experiences with various products or services would change others’ opinion of them. Studies 2a/2b contrasted participants’ intuitions about the potential social consequences of sharing WOM with the consequences. Studies 3a/3b and 4a/4b tested for the hypothesized mediating mechanism. Studies 5a/5b focused on negative WOM and used participants’ own reviews to compare intuitions with impact. Study 6 explored whether considering one’s own consumption experience mitigates the negative social impact of WOM.

Findings

Consumers expect positive WOM to improve perceptions as it conveys only positive cues about the communicator (i.e. helping intentions and a positive personality). Negative WOM is expected to have neutral impact, as it conveys mixed cues (i.e. helping intentions but a negative personality). In contrast, the authors show that sharing negative WOM tends to be quite detrimental, whereas sharing positive WOM has little impact. People are largely unaware of these effects.

Research limitations/implications

The research contributes to the literature on WOM and social transmission by comparing people’s intuitions about the social consequences of WOM with its actual consequences. The authors acknowledge that they used mostly WOM messages that were pre-written (vs spontaneously generated by participants). This may have constrained the generalizability of the results. Several potential moderators remain to be investigated, such as the role of message extremity, the interpersonal closeness between communicator and receiver, whether the WOM was solicited vs spontaneous, online vs offline, etc.

Practical implications

Greater effort is needed to raise consumers’ awareness about the gap between their expectations and the actual social consequences of WOM. Furthermore, marketers responsible for designing product review opportunities should be encouraged to provide consumers with more flexible options, such as the ability to easily remove an online review. Finally, consumers transmitting negative WOM in particular should be aware that their negative tone may compromise the persuasiveness of their message by making the receiver more vigilant and thus less receptive.

Originality/value

The authors are the first to directly contrast people’s intuitions about the social consequences of WOM with its consequences. Unlike the previous literature, the authors investigate people’s intuitions directly, and investigate the consequences of positive and negative WOM by comparing them to a neutral no-WOM condition. They also shed light on the specific personality traits people infer from WOM.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Linda Nasr, Jamie Burton and Thorsten Gruber

Front-line employee (FLE) well-being is an under-researched field. Contrasting the prevailing view that Positive Customer Feedback (PCF) can only have ‘positive’ impacts

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Abstract

Purpose

Front-line employee (FLE) well-being is an under-researched field. Contrasting the prevailing view that Positive Customer Feedback (PCF) can only have ‘positive’ impacts, this study aims to answer the counterintuitive question: Could the apparently positive construct ‘Positive Customer Feedback’ have a negative impact on the well-being of front-line employees? Consequently, working within the Transformative Service Research (TSR) framework, we investigate whether PCF can negatively affect the eudaimonic and hedonic well-being dimensions of FLEs, thus decreasing their overall psychological well-being level.

Design/methodology/approach

A multidisciplinary literature review was conducted, particularly in the social psychology, human resources and organizational behavior fields, to examine the potential negative impacts of PCF. Subsequently, an exploratory qualitative study consisting of seven focus groups with 45 FLEs and 22 in-depth interviews with managers working across various service industries were performed. All the transcripts were analyzed via an iterative hermeneutical process.

Findings

A model describing ten negative impacts and six key contingencies of PCF was developed. The identified impacts can negatively affect the eudaimonic and hedonic well-being dimensions of FLEs. PCF can have a negative impact on the eudaimonic dimensions such as harmony, respect and support. Moreover, PCF appears to increase the negative affect by creating tension, fear, strain and stress, thus, negatively affecting the happiness level of FLEs (hedonic well-being). The identified contingencies play a crucial role in determining the direction and intensity of the negative impact of PCF. Therefore, the overall psychological well-being level of FLEs can suffer as a result of PCF. This study also discusses managerial challenges associated with PCF management.

Research limitations/implications

The article discusses important managerial implications in the field of FLE well-being and PCF management and suggests directions for future research aiming to expand the boundaries of the current TSR agenda and service human resources.

Originality/value

This study is the first to explore the negative side of PCF from a TSR perspective. It extends the understanding of the overlooked area of PCF and FLE well-being.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 29 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Jingxian (Cecilia) Zhang, Kevin K. Byon, Kaijuan Xu and Haiyan Huang

The paper aims to (1) explore the positive and negative sociocultural, economic, and environmental impacts on satisfaction, and behavioral intentions; and (2) examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to (1) explore the positive and negative sociocultural, economic, and environmental impacts on satisfaction, and behavioral intentions; and (2) examine the changes in relationships among event impacts, satisfaction and behavioral intentions of host city residents before and after a major sporting event.

Design/methodology/approach

We used panel data to estimate how resident responses change over time. The data were collected three months before (N before = 266) and three months after (N after = 266) the Nanjing Youth Olympic Games. Data were analyzed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), structural equation modeling (SEM) and invariance tests.

Findings

A significant relationship exists between negative and positive perceived sociocultural, economic, and environmental impacts, satisfaction and behavioral intentions. In addition, findings suggest that the effect of the sociocultural impacts on satisfaction and of satisfaction on behavioral intentions strengthened after the event. The relationship between positive environmental impacts and satisfaction was reduced across the two points in time. Our results indicate that residents’ assessment regarding the sporting event partially changed over the whole six-month course of the study.

Originality/value

This study differs from most recent research in that it examines the sociocultural, economic, and environmental event impacts in modeling residents’ satisfaction and testing the influence of negative event impacts on residents’ satisfaction and behavioral intentions. The current study contributes to the literature by emphasizing the changes that occur regarding the relationships among event impacts, satisfaction and behavioral intentions across the same respondents over time.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Craig Webster, Chih-Lun (Alan) Yen and Sotiris Hji-Avgoustis

Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) is a controversial bill passed by the State of Indiana and signed into law in March 2015. The purpose of this paper is to look…

Abstract

Purpose

Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) is a controversial bill passed by the State of Indiana and signed into law in March 2015. The purpose of this paper is to look into whether there is empirical evidence that the political shock of RFRA had a negative empirical impact upon the hotel industry in Indiana’s major city, Indianapolis, and investigate how DMOs and other organizations in the tourism and hospitality industry worked in ways to counteract the threat of a great deal of loss of business caused by the national furor caused by the passing of the original bill in March 2015.

Design/methodology/approach

To fully examine the impact of RFRA on hospitality business in Indiana, secondary data were used in this study. The researchers used the Trend Market report created by Smith Travel Research (STR) (2016b) with a focus on the greater Indianapolis area, which include Indianapolis South East, Indianapolis Central Business District, Indianapolis Airport/Speedway, Indianapolis North Loop, and Indianapolis small towns. In the Trend Market report, hotel operation performance results are listed including occupancy percentage, average daily rate, revenue per available room, supply, demand, and revenue.

Findings

The findings from this investigation illustrate that there is no empirical reason to believe that the political shock of the RFRA controversy in Indiana in 2015 had a meaningful impact upon the hospitality and tourism industry in Indianapolis, despite concerns that it would make a big and negative impact upon the industry. While event planners may have a negative perception of the city of Indianapolis and the state, these perceptions do not seem to be enough to make a difference in terms of impacting upon the hospitality industry in Indianapolis.

Originality/value

There are lessons that could be learned from this, as many states in the USA continue to pass similar laws to RFRA, laws that are perceived as being problematic for those in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. The most noteworthy lesson is that the passing of laws that seem to threaten people of the LGBT community will bring a national response and will likely be accompanied with threats that are economic in nature. There is a great deal of evidence to show that passing any legislation that may be interpreted as infringing upon the rights of members of the LGBT community will result in substantial responses that may be negative in nature.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 May 2020

Jaylan Azer and Matthew Alexander

This study aims to show the impact of direct and indirect customers’ negatively valenced influencing behavior (NVIB) on other actors in online social networks.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to show the impact of direct and indirect customers’ negatively valenced influencing behavior (NVIB) on other actors in online social networks.

Design/methodology/approach

Four experiments were conducted in an online review setting that encompasses both restaurant and hotel reviews. The first study compares the impact of direct and indirect NVIB. The second, third and fourth studies measure this impact moderated by aggregate ratings, the volume of positive reviews and managerial responses.

Findings

Drawing on recent literature of customer engagement behavior, online reviews and social influence theory, this paper provides the first empirical results of the impact of direct and indirect NVIB, revealing the significant difference in their impact and the moderating role of the aggregate ratings, number of positive reviews and managerial responses on the cause-effect relationship between direct and indirect NVIB and other actors’ attitudes and behavioral intentions toward service providers.

Research limitations/implications

TripAdvisor reviews were selected for the reason of appropriateness rather than representativeness, using two service providers, hotels and restaurants.

Practical implications

This paper provides managers with new insights, which capture not only what customers say about service providers but also the impact of how they say it, suggesting that managers move beyond framing NVIB in generalized terms to considering the differences in the impact of its direct and indirect facets.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to provide empirical results about the significant difference in the impact of direct and indirect NVIB on other actors’ attitudes and behavioral intentions toward service providers, moderated by different heuristics, namely, ratings, volume of positive reviews and managerial responses.

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2021

Jennifer L. Stevens, Carol L. Esmark Jones and Mike Breazeale

Consumers are increasingly using review sites to exchange product information, whereas companies attempt to maintain control of brand-related communications. One method…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumers are increasingly using review sites to exchange product information, whereas companies attempt to maintain control of brand-related communications. One method marketers may take to retain control is to remove negative opinions about the brand. This paper aims to examine the impact on consumer’s brand perceptions when negative reviews are censored.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experimental studies were conducted to assess whether censorship of a negative online review, in the form of removal by the company, weakens brand relationship quality (BRQ) dimensions.

Findings

The results show that censoring negative online reviews has a damaging effect on BRQ. Additionally, the findings indicate that a brand may not be able to increase BRQ when a negative review has been posted, however strategic measures can be taken to diminish the potentially harmful impact.

Originality/value

As many brands still do not adequately understand how to handle negative online reviews, this research offers valuable implications in furthering the examination of negative electronic word-of-mouth and ways to diminish its harmful effects. Additionally, while substantial research focuses on the positive consequences of brand relationships, this research answers calls to examine the negative impacts to BRQ.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2021

Xuebing Dong, Xin Wen, Kui Wang and Chuangneng Cai

Negative media coverage has important impacts on firm financial performance, but existing studies have inconsistent views of this relationship and lack a unified…

Abstract

Purpose

Negative media coverage has important impacts on firm financial performance, but existing studies have inconsistent views of this relationship and lack a unified theoretical framework to explain how such impacts arise. This study aims to bridge this gap in the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses two sets of data encompassing publicly listed companies in Shanghai and Shenzhen stock exchanges from 2013 to 2019, which are covered by the China Stock Market and Accounting Research Database.

Findings

This study finds that the number of negative news coverages has an inverted U-shaped relationship with firm financial performance; this relationship is weakened by the proportion of shares held by institutional investors and strengthened by advertising intensity.

Practical implications

This study suggests that corporate executives should be aware of the potential value of a limited amount of negative news coverage and react with tolerance and caution when their companies encounter it.

Originality/value

This study uses two different routes provided in the elaboration likelihood model theory to fully explain the processes underlying changes in investors’ attitudes toward firms experiencing negative media coverage.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Timothy Lee Keiningham, Roland T. Rust, Bart Lariviere, Lerzan Aksoy and Luke Williams

Managers seeking to manage customer word-of-mouth (WOM) behavior need to understand how different attitudinal drivers (e.g. satisfaction, positive and negative emotion…

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Abstract

Purpose

Managers seeking to manage customer word-of-mouth (WOM) behavior need to understand how different attitudinal drivers (e.g. satisfaction, positive and negative emotion, commitment, and self-brand connection) relate to a range of WOM behaviors. They also need to know how the effects of these drivers are moderated by customer characteristics (e.g. gender, age, income, country). The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

To investigate these issues a built a large-scale multi-national database was created that includes attitudinal drivers, customer characteristics, and a full range of WOM behaviors, involving both the sending and receiving of both positive and negative WOM, with both strong and weak ties. The combination of sending-receiving, positive-negative and strong ties-weak ties results in a typology of eight distinct WOM behaviors. The investigation explores the drivers of those behaviors, and their moderators, using a hierarchical Bayes model in which all WOM behaviors are simultaneously modeled.

Findings

Among the many important findings uncovered are: the most effective way to drive all positive WOM behaviors is through maximizing affective commitment and positive emotions; minimizing negative emotions and ensuring that customers are satisfied lowers all negative WOM behaviors; all other attitudinal drivers have lower or even mixed effects on the different WOM behaviors; and customer characteristics can have a surprisingly large impact on how attitudes affect different WOM behaviors.

Practical implications

These findings have important managerial implications for promotion (which attitudes should be stimulated to produce the desired WOM behavior) and segmentation (how should marketing efforts change, based on segments defined by customer characteristics).

Originality/value

This research points to the myriad of factors that enhance positive and reduce negative word-of-mouth, and the importance of accounting for customer heterogeneity in assessing the likely impact of attitudinal drivers on word-of-mouth behaviors.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

José María Martín Martín, Juan F. Prados-Castillo, Mónica de Castro-Pardo and Juan De Dios Jimenez Aguilera

The expansion of online platforms for renting tourist accommodations has given rise to a great deal of controversy in society. Likewise, the arrival of tourists in…

Abstract

Purpose

The expansion of online platforms for renting tourist accommodations has given rise to a great deal of controversy in society. Likewise, the arrival of tourists in residential settings has led to a wide range of positive and negative impacts, resulting in conflicts between different stakeholders. The purpose of this paper is to analyze whether there is variation in the perception of the impacts associated with peer-to-peer accommodation platforms among different stakeholders? Additionally, it also seeks to investigate what kind of impacts generate the highest level of conflict among stakeholders?

Design/methodology/approach

Given the relative novelty of the problem, this paper proposes an exploratory study that sheds light on some of the main issues with the purpose of supporting further research in the future. The aim is to analyze which impacts are perceived as more positive or negative by each group and to create indexes of conflict for these groups regarding their perception of the impacts. This study is based on fieldwork carried out in April 2020, which consists of 600 online surveys of local residents in the city of Granada. This city, one of Spain’s main tourist spots, suffers the highest tourist pressure in the country.

Findings

The exploratory study suggests that the greatest consensus is generated in the assessment of economic impacts, either negative or positive. The greatest conflicts are related to the assessment of the effect of this activity on housing preservation. The group comprising accommodation owners of tourist flats is the one that shows a more dissenting opinion from the rest, confronting especially the group formed by citizens whose income depends on tourism.

Originality/value

There is a lack of studies on the perception of tourism impacts associated with online tourism rental platforms. This is the first study to analyze both, how the main stakeholders associated with this activity assess the different impacts derived from this form of tourist accommodation as a whole and the conflicts derived from such an assessment. An additional innovation is that the analysis investigates the potential fear of disease transmission caused by tourists. It would be interesting to continue this research by applying the same questionnaire in different environments, such as rural areas or societies with different structures from the one analyzed here. Likewise, future in-depth analysis of some of the conflicts is recommended so as to ascertain their origin.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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