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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Neeraj Kumar Jaiswal and Rajib Lochan Dhar

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how servant leadership, trust in leader and thriving drive employee creativity.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how servant leadership, trust in leader and thriving drive employee creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a dyadic sample of 48 teams (each team comprising a supervisor and the subordinates under him), the authors investigated the role of servant leadership in predicting employee creativity, the mediating role of trust in leader and interactive role of thriving therein.

Findings

Findings of the study revealed that servant leaders instilled trust within followers, which acted as a mediator in predicting creativity. Further, thriving was found to act as a moderator that influenced the relationship between trust in leader and employee creativity. Findings also indicated that thriving employees exhibited a greater degree of creative behavior when they trusted their leader.

Research limitations/implications

Based on these findings, the study draws the attention of managers toward the role of servant leadership, trust in leaders and thriving in promoting employee creativity.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to integrate servant leadership, trust in leader, thriving and creative behavior into a single theoretical model. The study further provides evidence to validate the proposed model in context of predicting employee creativity.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Avinash D. Pathardikar, Sangeeta Sahu and Neeraj Kumar Jaiswal

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between an employee’s beliefs about organizational ethics, career commitment (CC), affective commitment (AC…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between an employee’s beliefs about organizational ethics, career commitment (CC), affective commitment (AC) and career satisfaction (CS). The model expands the earlier work commitment models with CS as the outcome variable.

Design/methodology/approach

Subjects were drawn from a 2014 survey of frontline and middle level executives from the insurance sector in India using a structured questionnaire from six Indian insurance companies, 252 were analyzed with structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that executive perceptions about organizational ethics are important for both commitment and satisfaction. Ethical practices at work have a positive outcome on CC, AC and CS. The role of career commitment as a mediator in the relationship between ethics, AC and CS is evident.

Research limitations/implications

It is a cross-section study restricted to a single group with similar demographic characteristics. Hence, generalizability of the findings need further research among different groups. Common method variance is addressed using Harman single factor test.

Practical/implications

By working out ethical practices in the organization and developing a culture with clarity in business policies and financial constraints to stakeholders, the organizations can win employee commitment and satisfaction.

Originality/value

The theoretical contribution of this paper lies in its inclusive approach encompassing the ethical belief of individual with commitment and CS. It differs from earlier studies that have shown the influence of protestant work ethic on commitment. It highlights the similarities and differences between several work commitment models developed in a western context, and the model that we have developed in the Indian context.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Neeraj Sharma, Neeraj Ahuja, Rachin Goyal and Vinod Rohilla

Electric discharge drilling (EDD) is used to drill quality microholes on any conductive materials. EDD process parameters play a crucial role in the drilling. Depending…

Abstract

Purpose

Electric discharge drilling (EDD) is used to drill quality microholes on any conductive materials. EDD process parameters play a crucial role in the drilling. Depending upon the material characteristics, the cost of drilling also changes. Therefore, a suitable method is required to control the process parameters and drill quality microholes.

Design/methodology/approach

The input process parameters in the present work are peak current (Ip), pulse on-time (Ton) and pulse off-time (Toff). The trials were intended in accordance to central composite face-centered design of response surface methodology (RSM). The output responses, namely drilling rate (DR) and electrode wear ratio (EWR), were converted into a single response, that is, grade using Grey relational analysis (GRA). The grade value is further modeled by regression analysis. The empirical model was figured out using teaching–learning-based optimization (TLBO). The RSM-Grey-TLBO-based multicriteria decision-making (MCDM) is used to investigate the optimized process parameter setting.

Findings

The RSM-Grey-TLBO-based MCDM approach suggests that the optimized setting for DR and EWR is Ip: 3A; Ton: 40 µs; Toff: 42 µs. The percentage errors for the predicted and experimental results are 8.1 and 7.5% in DR and EWR, respectively.

Originality/value

The parametric optimization of EDD using RSM-Grey-TLBO-based MCDM approach while machining commercially pure titanium is still underway. Thus, this MCDM approach will give a path to the researchers working in this direction.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Vinti Singh, Jyotsana Singh, Radha Kushwaha, Monika Singh, Sandeep Kumar and Awadhesh Kumar Rai

Flowers and fruits of Madhuca longifolia (Koenig) (mahua) tree are edible and used as traditional Indian medicines. The physicochemical properties of different parts of…

Abstract

Purpose

Flowers and fruits of Madhuca longifolia (Koenig) (mahua) tree are edible and used as traditional Indian medicines. The physicochemical properties of different parts of mahua are investigated. This study aims to estimate the different mineral contents, polyphenols compounds and antioxidant activities by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl inhibition, reducing power, free radical scavenging activity using 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) and ferric reducing antioxidant power assays of mahua flower, ripe and unripe fruit.

Design/methodology/approach

Flavonoids were identified and quantified in yellow flowers and fruits of M. longifolia tree by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector. Low molecular weight carbohydrates were determined by the ICBio scan, a specific method for determining of carbohydrates. Mineral content is determined by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Physicochemical, nutritional and mineral properties of mahua flower, ripe and unripe fruit were investigated by the statistical approach of principal component analysis (PCA).

Findings

Ascorbic acid, gallic acid (GA), quercetin and myrcetin were the phenolic compounds identified and quantified in mahua flower and fruit extracts. Sugar profiling of mahua flowers and fruits confirmed the presence of inositol, sorbitol, mannitol, dextrose, fructose, sucrose, raffinose and maltose. The mineral content of Na, K, Mg and Ca was present in quite a good amount in all samples. Total phenolic content (TPC) was significantly high in mahua flower (25.3 ± 1.0 mg GA equivalent/g FW) followed by mahua unripe (15.8 ± 1.0 mg GA equivalent/g FW) and ripe fruit (14.3 ± 1.0 mg GA equivalent/g FW) at p = 5%. In contrast, total flavonoid contents (TFCs) were highest in ripe fruit, then mahua flower and unripe fruit. Positive correlations were predicted by PCA for mahua flower with TPC, antioxidant activity assays and minerals except for Na; ripe fruit with TFC and Na; and unripe fruit with maltose and sorbitol.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates the application of LIBS for the determination of elements present in the mahua flowers and fruits and reveals that mahua can be a good source of nutrients. Sugar profiling of mahua flower showed that it is a rich source of reducing and non-reducing sugar, proving that mahua flower juice can be used as a natural sweetener in the development of different food products, namely, biscuits, cookies, cake, jam, jelly, juice and squash.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Alok Mishra and Amrita Poonia

This paper aims to review the recent advances in processing and utilization of Madhuca longifolia flowers to address its potential as an industrial ingredient.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the recent advances in processing and utilization of Madhuca longifolia flowers to address its potential as an industrial ingredient.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes the harvesting practices of flowers and recent works on the value addition.

Findings

Mahua flowers are rich source of natural sugars (glucose, fructose, sucrose, etc.) and hence are deliberately used for liquor production by tribal besides various food products, namely, Mahua ladoo, barfi, kheer, sweet puri and as grain staple. Mahuain medicine has been curing people since ages such as in rakhtpitta, diarrhoea and skin diseases and as aphrodisiac, galactagogue, carminative, antihelmenthic, antibacterial and antioxidant. Mahua candy, cake, ready to serve beverages, toffee, squash, ladoo, bars, etc. have been developed as value-added products. However, such a wonderful nature’s gift remains underused due to post harvest spoilage.

Practical implications

Improvement in storage facilities and processing of flowers after harvesting and drying will lead to enhanced availability of flowers for industrial purposes for food, feed and fodder. More value-added products can be prepared by the preparation of flower-juice concentrate, as well as efforts are made to produce powder from the flowers.

Originality/value

Post-harvest spoilage of Mahua flowers due to improper collection and handling practices, and filthy storage conditions is the major limitation of Mahua flowers to be used as a potential industrial ingredient. An improvement in collection, handling and pre-processing practices can diversify its use from liquor production to various value-added and functional food products at an industrial scale.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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