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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

D. Todd Donavan, Xiang Fang, Neeli Bendapudi and Surendra N. Singh

Modern interactionism asserts that both the P (person) and the E (environment or situation) should be considered simultaneously in predicting attitudes and behaviors. In…

Abstract

Modern interactionism asserts that both the P (person) and the E (environment or situation) should be considered simultaneously in predicting attitudes and behaviors. In this paper, we apply the interactionist view to salesforce research. Specifically, we use salesforce socialization as an example to illustrate how interactionist concepts from psychology can be effectively applied in salesforce research. The role of qualitative research in this context is explored.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

We all know hectic mornings. Children to get up, chase round the house and get to school, pets to feed, bills to open, chores to do. All that and get ourselves ready and…

Abstract

We all know hectic mornings. Children to get up, chase round the house and get to school, pets to feed, bills to open, chores to do. All that and get ourselves ready and at work before nine. Now imagine you’d got through all that, finally landed at your desk and found yourself called straight into the supervisor’s office for “a quiet word”. Your offence? Your shoelaces are dirty. Not all over mind, just around the eyelets of your shoes. Perhaps your boss is crazy. Or perhaps they work at Mayo.

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Strategic Direction, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Matthew P. Gonring

The purpose of his paper is to show that the rational and emotional triggers associated with customer loyalty and employee engagement can be measured in a macro manner

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of his paper is to show that the rational and emotional triggers associated with customer loyalty and employee engagement can be measured in a macro manner through mathematical indexing. Myriad factors, among them digitalization and disintermediation, have gradually eroded the power of an elite group of senior managers to control corporate messaging and manage corporate reputation. Other stakeholder groups, particularly employees and customers, have become empowered under these current corporate conditions. For this reason, establishing high levels of customer loyalty and employee engagement are leading determinants of brand performance. These indexes can serve as powerful tools to build integrated messaging.

Design/methodology/approach

This article explores the impact of customer loyalty and employee engagement on corporate performance, and identifies how these qualities can be quantifiably measured by sophisticated mathematical indexes. To do this, the authors review the factors that contribute to form corporate reputation, and how this formation process has changed over time. It places special emphasis on how senior corporate leaders have conceded branding power to employee and customer stakeholders.

Findings

By highlighting the promising early successes of companies leading this research, this paper demonstrates the potential advantages effective use of customer loyalty and employee engagement indexes can return. By acknowledging the power of these indexes, companies have the unique capability to build integrated communications solutions that address the expectations of both employees and customers, the two most contributory groups in building brand strength.

Originality/value

By shedding light on changes in the modern marketplace, this article can help shape thinking on effective ways to leverage human capital in order to maintain and grow brand and reputation.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2010

Matthew S. OHern and Aric Rindfleisch

Abstract

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-728-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Len Tiu Wright

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2018

Ruth N. Bolton, Janet R. McColl-Kennedy, Lilliemay Cheung, Andrew Gallan, Chiara Orsingher, Lars Witell and Mohamed Zaki

The purpose of this paper is to explore innovations in customer experience at the intersection of the digital, physical and social realms. It explicitly considers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore innovations in customer experience at the intersection of the digital, physical and social realms. It explicitly considers experiences involving new technology-enabled services, such as digital twins and automated social presence (i.e. virtual assistants and service robots).

Design/methodology/approach

Future customer experiences are conceptualized within a three-dimensional space – low to high digital density, low to high physical complexity and low to high social presence – yielding eight octants.

Findings

The conceptual framework identifies eight “dualities,” or specific challenges connected with integrating digital, physical and social realms that challenge organizations to create superior customer experiences in both business-to-business and business-to-consumer markets. The eight dualities are opposing strategic options that organizations must reconcile when co-creating customer experiences under different conditions.

Research limitations/implications

A review of theory demonstrates that little research has been conducted at the intersection of the digital, physical and social realms. Most studies focus on one realm, with occasional reference to another. This paper suggests an agenda for future research and gives examples of fruitful ways to study connections among the three realms rather than in a single realm.

Practical implications

This paper provides guidance for managers in designing and managing customer experiences that the authors believe will need to be addressed by the year 2050.

Social implications

This paper discusses important societal issues, such as individual and societal needs for privacy, security and transparency. It sets out potential avenues for service innovation in these areas.

Originality/value

The conceptual framework integrates knowledge about customer experiences in digital, physical and social realms in a new way, with insights for future service research, managers and public policy makers.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Lesley White and Venkata Yanamandram

The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical framework of the factors that potentially influence dissatisfied customers to continue purchasing from their existing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical framework of the factors that potentially influence dissatisfied customers to continue purchasing from their existing service provider in the business‐to‐business (B2B) services sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This review paper synthesises the findings from previous studies on switching barriers, and relationship variables, dependence, and calculative commitment.

Findings

Five major factors deter customers from switching to an alternative service provider: switching costs; interpersonal relationships; the attractiveness of alternatives; service recovery; and inertia. These factors are mediated by dependence and calculative commitment.

Originality/value

This is the first comprehensive study of the factors that potentially influence dissatisfied customers to remain behaviourally loyal to a service provider in the B2B services sector. This important study has significance for marketers in developing strategies for customer retention and service recovery.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Aki Jääskeläinen

The purpose of this paper is to compare the characteristics of performance measurement in cross-functional and supplier-oriented purchasing and supply management (PSM…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the characteristics of performance measurement in cross-functional and supplier-oriented purchasing and supply management (PSM) practices. It clarifies the purposes and content of performance measurement in three PSM practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study approach is utilized in this study. Each of the cases is related to a contemporary performance measurement development project during the period 2015–2016. Interviews are conducted to obtain a pre-understanding of the research questions at hand. The case studies continue as an action research including measurement development workshops.

Findings

Identification of causalities between measurement objects and the measurement value benefits are contemporary issues of performance measurement development in the PSM context. The findings indicate that the measurement of outputs and outcomes instead of inputs and measurement supporting supplier relationship management is increasingly important in the service context. Measurement purpose affects the characteristics of PSM performance measurement. This study identifies that more informal control and non-standard measures are needed in interactive PSM practices such as cross-functional integration.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides practical examples of performance measurement in service purchasing, classifies the characteristics of performance measurement and highlights the need to extend the scope of measurement in the PSM context. The findings of the case studies reported support practitioners in developing performance measurement that satisfies contemporary managerial needs.

Originality/value

Earlier studies are often not explicit with the purpose of performance measurement. This study contributes to the existing literature by linking performance measurement characteristics to the understanding of PSM practices and providing a wider overview of the varying characteristics of performance measurement supporting strategic purchasing of services.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Aki Jääskeläinen, Harri Laihonen and Antti Lönnqvist

The purpose of this paper is to study the distinctive features of service performance measurement. It also provides an overview of current status of performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the distinctive features of service performance measurement. It also provides an overview of current status of performance measurement in three service sectors in Finland.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on two complementary empirical studies. In the first study, data were gathered through individual interviews in Finnish service organizations. In the second study, group interviews were held in order to enhance the understanding. The service sectors studied are knowledge-intensive, public and industrial services. There are two main units of analysis in the data set: an organization and service operations.

Findings

The results show that the specific performance measurement characteristics are more apparent at service operations level. The findings reveal three distinctive features of service performance measurement. First, the contingency perspective stresses a need to consider the characteristics of different service contexts. Second, customer-orientation implies that the measurement should also cover customers’ actions during the service operation as well as the impacts of service operations. Third, the systemic perspective proposes that performance measurement should encompass all actors participating to service operations.

Research limitations/implications

The results provide support for structuring the existing research and identifying paths for future research. They also assist practitioners in their search for best measurement practices.

Originality/value

This paper contributes by providing empirical insights from three service sectors on the development needs of performance measurement. The findings provide understanding on what exactly makes service performance measurement problematic and suggests three paths to move forward.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 34 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2012

Philipp “Phil” Klaus and Stan Maklan

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize, construct, refine and empirically validate a multiple‐item scale for measuring customers' service experience (EXQ).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize, construct, refine and empirically validate a multiple‐item scale for measuring customers' service experience (EXQ).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors present exploratory research developing a conceptualization of service experience based on a two‐stage approach: initial item generation through qualitative research, initial purification of these findings through exploratory factor analysis, and validation through the use of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The paper conceptualizes and validates the concept of customer/service experience. In total, 19 items in four dimensions of the EXQ scale were identified: product experience, outcome focus, moments‐of‐truth and peace‐of‐mind. These dimensions reflect service experience perceptions. The findings support the conclusion that the service experience has a significant impact on customer satisfaction, loyalty and word‐of‐mouth intentions. The scale demonstrates good psychometric properties based on the variety of reliability and validity tests utilized and builds upon extant research.

Practical implications

The research provides managers with the dimensions of service experience that influence purchase behavior and provides researchers with a sought‐after conceptualization of service experience.

Originality/value

The authors believe that this is the first empirically founded conceptualization and measurement of the service/customer experience.

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