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Article

Wejdene Yangui and Nibrass Hajtaïeb El Aoud

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants of the need for reassurance, while emphasizing the role of perceived traceability.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants of the need for reassurance, while emphasizing the role of perceived traceability.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through individual interviews, and analyzed by thematic analysis.

Findings

Results showed that the traceability of modern foods is low perceived by the consumers. This indirectly influences the need for reassurance toward the modern foods by reducing the confidence in these products and strengthening the feeling about the risk associated to their consumption.

Research limitations/implications

The major limits of this paper concern the development of the research model through the means of an exploratory study. This can affect the possibility to generalize results since the described hypotheses are not quantitatively validated. Another limit is concerned by the non-investigation of moderating factors, which can be the object of future researches.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the few efforts integrating the need for reassurance in a theoretical model of consumer behavior, and explaining its origins. This justifies the use of a qualitative methodology.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Mark Durkin

This paper reports the findings of the latest, quantitative phase of a continuing study that explores the impact of the internet on bank‐customer relationships. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports the findings of the latest, quantitative phase of a continuing study that explores the impact of the internet on bank‐customer relationships. The specific aim is to shed light on customers' own views about when, how and in which circumstances personal contact with bank staff remains appropriate despite developments in online banking.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on key elements of the theoretical framework developed in earlier phases of the study and taking methodological leads in the academic literature, a questionnaire was constructed and delivered to 5,000 customers of one UK bank. The usable response rate was just less than ten per cent, delivering almost 500 sets of respondent data, which were analysed by multiple regression.

Findings

Motivating and inhibiting influences on interaction with bank staff are identified. Data analysis shows that the more complex the service product offerings, the more customers require reassurance about internet security and the impersonal and intangible nature of online transactions. At the highest level of complexity, they feel the need for “coaching” in the procedures of online banking by bank staff, face‐to‐face and perhaps even in the home.

Research limitations/implications

While Stage I consisted of a small number of depth interviews with specialist managers in four countries, Stage II analysed a large number of questionnaire returns from customers of one bank in one country. There is obvious scope to enlarge both study settings and thereby improve the generalisability of findings and conclusions.

Practical implications

The implications for marketing planning and strategy development in the banking environment are discussed, including the possibility that a viable strategic option could be reduce the emphasis on online transactions in the particular case of higher net‐worth customers.

Originality/value

Adds to the body of knowledge about the rapidly developing phenomenon of remote banking transactions, especially the purchasing of financial services, facilitated by customer adoption of online banking (or “internet banking” or “e‐banking”).

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article

Toby Newall and Louise Steel

Explains how marketers can reach 15 to 18 year olds by developing deeper understanding of this age group, especially their views on the consumer environment; the article…

Abstract

Explains how marketers can reach 15 to 18 year olds by developing deeper understanding of this age group, especially their views on the consumer environment; the article is based on RDSi’s Youth2 research. Acknowledges that many marketers are insecure about this market because of its cynicism and constant need for new products. Summarises themes that emerge from youngsters’ descriptions of their world: life is portrayed as fast, exciting but challenging; the importance of profits can make life seem superficial, uniform and uncreative; America remains the dominant influence but Mediterranean styles are also valued; behavioural standards are much less set than in the past. Concludes that marketers have opportunities: to localise their appeal, provide reassurance, and move from appealing to selfishness to appeal more based on relationships ‐ but creative marketing is what counts most.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article

Niall Piercy

Purchasing behaviour across traditional retail and internet routes to market is becoming increasingly integrated. The positive and negative consequences of such behaviour…

Abstract

Purpose

Purchasing behaviour across traditional retail and internet routes to market is becoming increasingly integrated. The positive and negative consequences of such behaviour for multi‐channel businesses have not been thoroughly examined – while an offline retail presence may reassure customers purchasing from an online channel, poor service online may negatively influence customer usage of an offline channel. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey of the online customers of four companies is employed and structural equation modelling used to investigate influences of demographic and behavioural variables (purchase involvement, loyalty, experience with the internet, company and product‐type) on positive and negative cross‐channel behaviour (CCB).

Findings

Strong evidence for both positive and negative customer CCB is found. Females, higher purchase involvement, higher loyalty and those with more experience of the company were more likely to display positive CCB; higher education, experience with the product type and online channel negatively influenced positive CCB. Increased age, education, occupation/class and purchase involvement lead to more negative CCB; product and company experience lead to reduced levels of negative CCB.

Research limitations/implications

As a first step towards understanding of customer CCB the research generates many insights; however, more research is required to explore in more depth each of the constructs discussed and measured.

Practical implications

Understanding how different customer groups display different tendencies for CCB can help companies shape fulfilment and delivery strategies across different channels to market.

Originality/value

The study makes contributions to customer cross‐channel customer behaviour, developing implications for future research as well as management practice.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article

Matthew G. Nagler, Fredi Kronenberg, Edward J. Kennelly and Bei Jiang

This paper aims to explore the role of observable product characteristics and label wording in consumers' valuations for credence goods, products for which key…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the role of observable product characteristics and label wording in consumers' valuations for credence goods, products for which key characteristics may not be fully evaluated even after purchase. The objective is to draw conclusions with relevance to pricing policy.

Design/methodology/approach

Hedonic price equations are estimated for a dietary supplement called black cohosh, taken by women for relief from menopausal symptoms.

Findings

Consumers respond in expected ways to label words that directly indicate product characteristics: for example, paying more for a product labeled as suitable for vegetarians. But surprising results occur for some nonspecific label words (e.g. “guaranteed” is associated with lower prices), suggesting that consumers view these words as indirect signals with respect to unobservable qualities. Additionally, consumers pay more for packages containing more units (e.g. tablets) even when the time supply of product is held constant; this outcome is consistent with the notion that sheer quantity reassures consumers about value and could indicate a reaction to uncertainty in the overall value proposition.

Research limitations/implications

The study relies on list prices in place of transacted prices, so consumers' true valuations may not be reflected with complete accuracy. The study should be repeated in the future using scanner data on actual product transactions.

Practical implications

The indirect signals transmitted by label words and other observable attributes play a key role in consumers' valuations for credence goods, and so are highly relevant to pricing strategy.

Originality/value

Previous studies have considered willingness‐to‐pay for label‐indicated credence qualities, but have not looked at the role of indirect signals/indicators.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Building the Good Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-629-2

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Article

Anne Abraham, Hemant Deo and Helen Irvine

This paper aims to focus on a number of unexpected disclosures by major Australian banks, to highlight the subjectivity of financial reports and their failure to present…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on a number of unexpected disclosures by major Australian banks, to highlight the subjectivity of financial reports and their failure to present an accurate portrayal of the underlying realities, and to propose that corporate governance disclosures are required to provide reassurance that financial reports are trustworthy.

Design/methodology/approach

Mouck's institutional framework of financial regulation portrays financial reporting as a “game” played within a set of rules. It provides insights about the subjectivity of financial reports which are illustrated with archival evidence from banks' reports and activities.

Findings

The banks' financial reports were shown, in the light of later revelations, to portray an unrealistic view of their operations. Disclosures about corporate governance practices play a strong legitimising role, enhancing perceptions that financial reports correspond with organisational realities.

Research limitations/implications

This study considers a narrow population of companies within one industry. By extending the focus, greater evidence could be provided that accounting standards and financial reporting requirements have lost their connection with business practices.

Practical implications

In spite of financial reporting reforms, financial reports are becoming less reflective of companies' activities and performance. This questions the usefulness of accounting standards, and the effectiveness of regulatory systems. Future reforms to accounting standards need to address these issues.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the contention that the financial reports of several Australian banks fail to match the realities that lie beneath is really a broader challenge to the usefulness and credibility of Australia's system of financial reporting and regulation.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Article

Graham Pryor

The purpose of this paper is to identify the workflows and norms of scientific researchers in their use of source and output repositories and to design functional links…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the workflows and norms of scientific researchers in their use of source and output repositories and to design functional links between them that will enhance the value of research data.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports on the key findings from a survey of seven scientific disciplines, with analysis of data from an online questionnaire and a series of structured interviews, conducted with a representative cohort of researchers.

Findings

The paper finds that significant support was expressed for the provision of bi‐directional links between source and output repositories, tempered by a limited knowledge of repositories among the survey constituency and the need for reassurance on measures for the protection of data ownership. Diversity in the application of good data management practice is marked both between and within each of the disciplines surveyed, with solutions adopted characterised by a culture of self‐sufficiency and the use of repositories driven by practical research requirements. Common areas for improvement have been recognised across the disciplines, notably in the processes described for the assignment of metadata, and opportunities for expert assistance in data management were identified.

Research limitations/implications

Having identified the specificity of requirements and levels of understanding within individual disciplines, further research would benefit the design and alignment of repository and information services.

Practical implications

Observations of researcher attitudes and behaviours provide clues to future service provision, and to the principal functions of data repositories. Evidence for the potential realignment of institutional information services is also provided.

Originality/value

This paper presents a candid description of the challenges facing data managers, curators and information service providers.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article

Brigitte S. Cypress

This qualitative phenomenological study examined the experiences of patients, their family members, and the nurses in the intensive care unit during critical illness. Five…

Abstract

This qualitative phenomenological study examined the experiences of patients, their family members, and the nurses in the intensive care unit during critical illness. Five participants from each category participated in two interviews over a period of five months. Content analysis of the interview transcripts revealed five integrating common themes, each reflecting concepts from the Roy Adaptation Model (RAM). The ICU experience among all participants is interdependence. Adaptation in the ICU integrated family as a unit, physical care/comfort, physiological care and psychosocial support, resulting in transformation.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Article

Juliet Harland, Peter A. Bath, Ann Wainwright and Jeremy Seymour

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the information behaviours of patients newly diagnosed with dementia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the information behaviours of patients newly diagnosed with dementia.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a cross-sectional qualitative study, using in-depth interviews with 13 people recently diagnosed with dementia.

Findings

Reactions to a diagnosis of dementia varied and these influenced the perception of the value of information when making sense of the diagnosis. Information was avoided if participants did not feel that they could influence their situation; instead, participants relied on internal explanations to normalise their memory loss. Barriers to information seeking and use included not knowing who to speak to, perceived stigma associated with dementia and difficulty of applying generic information to own situation. Some participants valued information that confirmed their suspicions and provided explanations.

Research limitations/implications

This study was based on a small sample size (n=13), the findings may not be generalisable to all people with dementia; however, the findings may be transferable to people who have recently been diagnosed with dementia.

Practical implications

There is not a one-size-fits-all approach to information provision for people with dementia at diagnosis, information should be tailored to individuals.

Social implications

There is a need to address the feeling of powerlessness and futility that some people with dementia experience at diagnosis, as this precludes independent information seeking and use. People receiving a diagnosis may need additional support and information pertinent to their specific circumstances, separate from the information needs of their carer(s).

Originality/value

The study provides a new understanding of the information behaviours of people recently diagnosed with dementia and how these differ from those of informal carers.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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