Search results

1 – 9 of 9
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Peter Garrett

Nederburg Wine Auction, celebrating its 20th event this year (1994), has truly established itself internationally alongside auctions in France, Germany and America. It was…

Abstract

Nederburg Wine Auction, celebrating its 20th event this year (1994), has truly established itself internationally alongside auctions in France, Germany and America. It was the brainchild of a past managing director of the giant winemaker wholesalers Stellenbosch Farmers Winery. Dignitaries from all over the world attend this South African fine wine showcase. The organisation involved in getting more than a thousand people together also includes a prestigious fashion show and, at the end, a charity auction. Preparations are ongoing throughout the year, for the occasion which is becoming increasingly ambitious and innovative.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Peter Garrett

The relative popularity of South Africa's leading grape varietals and some blends are discussed from the time vitis vinifera was introduced to the Cape of Good Hope in the…

Abstract

The relative popularity of South Africa's leading grape varietals and some blends are discussed from the time vitis vinifera was introduced to the Cape of Good Hope in the 1650's to the present day. The word ‘Cultivar’ which is sometimes used, is the South African word meaning cultivated variety. These cultivars were almost all French, Spanish and German because of those countries relative proximity to Holland from whence the early settlers had come. Most of the grapes were given local names, and their European identities were, in many cases, not established until the 20th century; during which period South Africa's own hybrid Pinotage was produced. The effects of the sanctions era, and its lifting are examined, and the reasons for popularity changes explored. Some conclusion is attempted relating in part, but by no means wholly, to fashion.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Peter Garrett

Natural wine was not a factor in South Africa until after 1935. However, the hybrid Pinotage was produced in the 1920's and the now quasi government KWV representing wine…

Abstract

Natural wine was not a factor in South Africa until after 1935. However, the hybrid Pinotage was produced in the 1920's and the now quasi government KWV representing wine farmers, was far reachingly empowered to fix the price of distilling wine. South Africa is traditionally a national brandy and beer drinking nation, and that largely stands today. The monopolistic KWV backed by the Afrikaaner government since 1948 has continuously increased its hold as a stabilising force. In reply the producing wholesalers have merged from many into four very large firms of which SFW is by far the biggest. Even the two largest of those were controlled by one firm until joined by KWV, their long term adversary, which took a thirty percent interest SFW's vision of natural wine being more healthy than spirits has been its theme from the time of its founder W.C. Winshaw in 1935. This is demonstrated in many ways. The new South African government, no longer Afrikaaner led, has set up a competition's board enquiry which is almost certainly destined to change completely, the face of the whole SA wine and spirits industry. The purpose of this paper is to set on record the old regime, and Stellenbosch Fanner's part therein as a matter of record and learning.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Peter Garrett

Describes South Africa's viticultural background to illustrate the shape of that industry's present marketing picture in the light of diminishing anctions and the…

Abstract

Describes South Africa's viticultural background to illustrate the shape of that industry's present marketing picture in the light of diminishing anctions and the country's present socio‐economic changes — being out of the international market for such a long time has had interesting effects on the whole of the South African market.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Peter Garrett

The wine industry's contribution to the country's gross domestic product is 16.3 billion rand. The total turnover of wine and alcoholic associated beverages amounted to…

Abstract

The wine industry's contribution to the country's gross domestic product is 16.3 billion rand. The total turnover of wine and alcoholic associated beverages amounted to 10.7 billion, of which R3.2 billion was exported. The industry provided direct employment for 257,000 people, and wine tourism for 59,000. There was a significant increase in local excise duty, and overall the standard wine prices increased noticeably during 2004.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Peter Garrett

South Africa's wine industry employs some 200,000 people and contributes over eight percent to the country's total exports. Recently it had cause to celebrate. After four…

Abstract

South Africa's wine industry employs some 200,000 people and contributes over eight percent to the country's total exports. Recently it had cause to celebrate. After four years the European Union and South Africa, finally in May, signed an agreement. One of the terms stipulates that Port, Sherry, Grappa, and some others, will shortly cease to be names used by SA producers. However, the EU is allowing 43 million litres of wine per year to be imported duty free. This is 10 million more than hitherto. Also a grant of 15 million Euros is generously being given for development aid.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Peter Garrett

Since last year's survey, the major progress in the SA wine market has been driven by co‐operation amongst its younger wine fanners, and by the recently formed ‘Wines of…

Abstract

Since last year's survey, the major progress in the SA wine market has been driven by co‐operation amongst its younger wine fanners, and by the recently formed ‘Wines of South Africa (WOSA)’. There is however, a great deal more of interest.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Peter Garrett

This is an update of the article in Number 3 of Volume 4 of the Journal in 1992. The omnipotence of KWV backed by the Afrikaans — led government shielded wine farmers to…

Abstract

This is an update of the article in Number 3 of Volume 4 of the Journal in 1992. The omnipotence of KWV backed by the Afrikaans — led government shielded wine farmers to the extent that they became complacent both before and during the world sanctions. The change of government, downfall of apartheid, and lifting of sanctions all wrought revolutionary changes including a government enquiry into KWV and the wine industry as a whole. Incidentally, export inexperience of many wineries caused errors of judgement in that field. The most widespread was resultant local shortages in spite of previous reassurances to the contrary. The recent worldwide “fruit‐forward” wine style fashion puzzled South African farmers who reacted in various ways and completely out of unison. Nor were they helped by the realisation of the fact that there was widespread vine disease in the country. Nevertheless, exporting volumes quickly surpassed expectation, and consequently the total area under vines began to increase, with many new names entering the industry. The old price control disappeared and market forces began to take control once again. One example of these is the international shortage of red wine, leading to the previously unheard of importation of low priced red wine. Summing up, it is clear that South Africa, the eighth largest of the world's producers, is firmly back in the international wine and spirit market. This is assisted by increasing tourism to the beautiful Cape.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

David A. Priilaid

Through the use of both sight and blind‐based quality metrics, the purpose of this paper is to ascertain the extent to which the sighted appreciation of a wine's intrinsic…

Downloads
1137

Abstract

Purpose

Through the use of both sight and blind‐based quality metrics, the purpose of this paper is to ascertain the extent to which the sighted appreciation of a wine's intrinsic merit is confounded by extrinsic cues such as price and region of origin.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a database of sighted and blind tastings of three red South African wines (Cabernet, Merlot and Shiraz) over the period 1993‐2001, a series of multiple linear regression models is developed to explain sighted quality ratings.

Findings

The meta‐model, with an adjusted R2 of 31 per cent, indicates three statistically significant explicatory factors, namely price, region, and intrinsic quality. The price cue alone explains 84 per cent of sighted quality assessments; the combined effect of both the region and price cue explains 95 per cent. This finding suggests that when quality is measured from a sighted perspective, area becomes a significant explicator, along with price. It is only once the cues of region and price have been factored into the meta‐model that intrinsic merit becomes relevant, and here, only to an extremely limited extent (5 per cent). The lack of correspondence between sighted and blind tasting scores, suggests that for sighted judgements – extrinsic cues appear to be masking the wine's intrinsic merit.

Originality/value

For the first time, blind and sighted tasting results are collated into one database and statistically interrogated. The findings show how we are deleteriously distracted by the apparent efficacy of extrinsic cues.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

1 – 9 of 9