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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2021

Ned Kock

J-curve relationship analyses can provide valuable insights to information systems (IS) researchers. This paper aims to discuss moderated mediation in IS research and the…

Abstract

Purpose

J-curve relationship analyses can provide valuable insights to information systems (IS) researchers. This paper aims to discuss moderated mediation in IS research and the related emergence of J-curve relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on an illustrative study in the field of IS, the author Lays out three steps to combine moderation and J-curve analyses, with the goal of more fully understanding the underlying moderated mediation relationships. The paper proposes a new segmentation delta method to test for J-curve emergence, as part of this framework.

Findings

The paper shows, in the context of this study, the complementarity of moderation and J-curve analyses.

Research limitations/implications

Currently, IS researchers rarely conduct moderation and J-curve analyses in a complementary way, even though there are software tools, and related methods, which allow them to do so in a relatively straightforward way.

Originality/value

The analyses were conducted with the software WarpPLS, a widely used tool that allows for moderated mediation and J-curve analyses, in a way that is fully compatible with the set of steps presented in this paper.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 23 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Shivam Gupta, Subhas C. Misra, Ned Kock and David Roubaud

Use of cloud-based enterprise resource planning (ERP) services equips an SME to forego the requirements of high financial budget, IT infrastructure, and trained IT…

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3058

Abstract

Purpose

Use of cloud-based enterprise resource planning (ERP) services equips an SME to forego the requirements of high financial budget, IT infrastructure, and trained IT personnel as it is required for on-premise ERP solution. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the organizational and technological factors as well as the factors that concern the performance of cloud service provider. These concerns are known as extrinsic factors and they are compliance, network, and information security. This study links the organizational and technological factors of SMEs and the extrinsic factors of cloud vendor for the successful implementation of cloud ERP.

Design/methodology/approach

Resource dependence theory (RDT) was used to understand the relationship of SMEs and cloud service provider. Structural equation modeling was employed in analyzing the data of 208 SMEs that were collected through a survey.

Findings

The empirical analysis supports the RDT as the critical success factors of the SMEs have a positive relationship with the extrinsic factors (compliance, network, and information security) during the cloud ERP implementation.

Research limitations/implications

The data collected in this study is from India and this acts as a limitation as the result might not hold true for other countries and regions. Also, the data collected are cross-sectional and only represent the perspective of the respondents at the time of filling the questionnaire.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to bring out a relationship between SMEs and cloud service provider for the successful implementation of cloud ERP.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Applying Partial Least Squares in Tourism and Hospitality Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-700-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Azim Danesh and Ned Kock

The purpose of research is to examine the communication optimization theory by comparing two business process representation approaches and related redesign guidelines…

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1765

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of research is to examine the communication optimization theory by comparing two business process representation approaches and related redesign guidelines through an experiment.

Design/methodology/approach

The experiment examined two process representation approaches involving 114 subjects. Each method gravitated around a different business process representation – one placed emphasis on business process activities and their sequencing, and the other on the web of communication interactions found in business processes.

Findings

The key finding was that an emphasis on a communication‐oriented view of processes seems to increase perceived modeling quality and redesign success.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from various information systems classes at a university. The participants were not redesign team members in an actual organizational redesign project. Future studies should focus on the characteristics of the designers.

Practical implications

The findings should allow managers and practitioners involved in operational‐level process redesign to acknowledge and focus on the flow of information rather than just the activities performed or at least determine a balance between these two approaches. Further, the information system developers and designers should be able to better align information systems design with business processes techniques. Using communication flow methodologies in the analysis stage should significantly help the design and the development processes.

Originality/value

This research was one of the first experimental studies to test the communication flow optimization theory and its effect on business process redesign.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Ned Kock, Robert Davison, Raul Wazlawick and Rosalie Ocker

The guest‐editors of the first Special Issue on E‐Collaboration provide an introduction to the issue. E‐collaboration is broadly defined as collaboration among individuals…

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806

Abstract

The guest‐editors of the first Special Issue on E‐Collaboration provide an introduction to the issue. E‐collaboration is broadly defined as collaboration among individuals engaged in a common task using electronic technologies. A brief history of the evolution of e‐collaboration technologies is offered along with a discussion of research in the area. The paper concludes with a brief review of the contributions to the Special Issue and a look at one important future challenge for e‐collaboration researchers, the challenge of theoretical summarization.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Ned Kock and Murad Moqbel

The purpose of this study is to fill a gap in evolutionary theorizing in the field of information systems. Evolutionary theorizing has recently been added as a useful tool…

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196

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to fill a gap in evolutionary theorizing in the field of information systems. Evolutionary theorizing has recently been added as a useful tool to the research repertoire of information systems investigators. However, the literature on evolutionary theorizing and related empirical research lacks a clear framework that explicitly shows how information systems researchers can go, step-by-step, from a generic model of the evolution of traits in our ancestral past to a more specific model depicting the effects of technology facilitation of those traits among modern humans. The purpose of this study is to fill this gap through a framework composed of six stages.

Design/methodology/approach

To discuss and illustrate the framework, the authors develop an easy-to-understand generic path model explicitly depicting relationships among variables related to events that occurred in our evolutionary past. We then incrementally adapt this generic path model, eventually arriving at a focused path model depicting causal relationships among social networking site use, job satisfaction, organizational commitment and job performance. In doing so, the authors also develop a theoretical model about how social networking site use can affect job performance, where a positive total effect is predicted via positive intermediate effects on job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

Findings

To discuss the final stage in the framework, the authors present an illustrative example where the focused path model is tested based on a study of the effect of Facebook use on job performance among 178 working professionals across the USA. This illustrative example provides general support for the theoretical model.

Research limitations/implications

The counterintuitive hypothesis that Facebook use is associated with increased job performance is supported.

Practical implications

Social networking site use by organizational employees is likely to be associated with improved job performance.

Originality/value

This study provides a clear framework that shows how researchers can go from a generic evolutionary path model in our ancestral past to a more specific model comprising technology effects in modern humans.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Ned Kock and Francis Lau

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1300

Abstract

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

John Nosek, Munir Mandviwalla and Ned Kock

Mobile technology research focuses on supporting the individual mobile worker. CCSW research has primarily focused on supporting distributed, but fixed‐site workers. This…

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115

Abstract

Mobile technology research focuses on supporting the individual mobile worker. CCSW research has primarily focused on supporting distributed, but fixed‐site workers. This research bridges both research foci by expanding to include mobile, anytime, anyplace support. The VLab (Virtual laboratory) provides anytime, anyplace process support for mobile software development teams. A longitudinal evaluation of group interactions in multiple extant teams establishes a baseline that helps to identify process support requirements. This baseline can be used to judge the effect of introducing process support technology that addresses specific context variables in group interactions.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Ned Kock, Kelly Hilmer, Craig Standing and Stanley Clark

This article is based on a position paper for the “Collaboration Technologies Support of Learning Process” track of the 2000 Americas Conference on Information Systems. In…

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175

Abstract

This article is based on a position paper for the “Collaboration Technologies Support of Learning Process” track of the 2000 Americas Conference on Information Systems. In it, the track chairs examine past research and future challenges related to the topic of the conference track. The paper builds on published empirical and theoretical research on the use of collaboration technologies to support learning processes. Its focus is on a key element of learning, namely knowledge communication. Key empirical studies and relevant theories are reviewed. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Robert J. McQueen, Karen Rayner and Ned Kock

Face‐to‐face business meetings are a widely used method of group interaction, and a rich source of data on what actually happens in group discussions. Active participation…

Abstract

Face‐to‐face business meetings are a widely used method of group interaction, and a rich source of data on what actually happens in group discussions. Active participation in a meeting is usually perceived to be making an oral contribution of some kind to the discussion. This paper describes a field study of ten face‐to‐face business meetings which were videotaped and subsequently analysed. Participant contributions were coded, and the data summarized. The mean contribution was approximately 12 seconds and 18 words. The most common contribution type was information giving. The highest single contributor in each meeting captured, on average, about 30% of the available airtime, while the two highest, combined, captured over half of the airtime. These findings are discussed within the context of requirements for designers of collaborative technology systems to support group interpersonal communication through the use of computing and data communication technologies.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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