Search results

1 – 10 of 32
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Wowek Sean Kearney, James Jurica and Theresa Entzi

This study examined the value of using near-peer video-based feedback to help train aspiring school leaders in coaching strategies. This research is part of a larger study…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined the value of using near-peer video-based feedback to help train aspiring school leaders in coaching strategies. This research is part of a larger study in which feedback was solicited from both aspiring teachers and aspiring school leaders. The current study focused on the responses provided by the aspiring school leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilized a phenomenological design. Undergraduate students enrolled in a public university in the Southwestern United States were recorded delivering instruction during their final semester of student teaching. These videos were uploaded to a secure website using EdPuzzle. Graduate students aspiring to be principals who were enrolled in a supervision course at the same university observed these classroom videos and provided feedback.

Findings

In regard to what participants learned about using video recordings, responses of aspiring principals fell into three themes as follows: establishing trust, providing critical feedback and broadening perspectives.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by it being a small-scale study conducted at one public university in the Southwestern United States. Accordingly, the findings of this study are limited in their generalizability.

Practical implications

This study highlights the usefulness of collaborations between educator preparation programs and principal preparation programs to enhance the learning of both student groups.

Originality/value

This research adds to the small but growing body of literature regarding near-peer video-based feedback and its potential value in helping aspiring principals practice coaching skills using written feedback.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 December 2019

Matilda R. Brady and Paul Goethals

To recover the growing deficit between American and near-peer mobile artillery ranges, the US Army is exploring the use of the M982 Excalibur munition, a family of…

Downloads
5425

Abstract

Purpose

To recover the growing deficit between American and near-peer mobile artillery ranges, the US Army is exploring the use of the M982 Excalibur munition, a family of long-range precision projectiles. This paper aims to analyze the effectiveness of the M982 in comparison to the M795 and M549A1 projectiles to further the understanding of what this new asset contributes.

Design/methodology/approach

Based upon doctrinal scenarios for target destruction, a statistical analysis is performed using Monte Carlo simulation to identify a likely probability of kill ratio for the M982. A values-based hierarchical modeling approach is then used to differentiate the M982 from similar-type projectiles quantitatively in terms of several different attributes. Finally, sensitivity analyzes are presented for each of the value attributes, to identify areas where measures may lack robustness in precision.

Findings

Based upon a set of seven value measures, such as maximum range, effective range, the expected number of rounds to destroy a target, and the unit cost of a munition, the M982 1a-2 was found to be best suited for engaging point and small area targets. It is noted, however, that the M795 and M549A1 projectiles are likely better munition options for large area targets. Hence, an integrated targeting plan may best optimize the force’s weapon systems against a near-peer adversary.

Originality/value

The findings provide initial evidence that doctrinal adjustments in how the Army uses its artillery systems may be beneficial in facing near-peer adversaries. In addition, the values-based modeling approach offered in this research provides a framework for which similar technological advances may be examined.

Details

Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-6439

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Jessie Nixon

This paper aims to demonstrate how teaching the discourse of critique, an integral part of the video production process, can be used to eliminate barriers for young people…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate how teaching the discourse of critique, an integral part of the video production process, can be used to eliminate barriers for young people in gaining new media literacy skills helping more young people become producers rather than consumers of digital media.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes an instrumental qualitative case study (Stake, 2000) in two elective high school video production classrooms in the Midwestern region of the USA. The author conducted observations, video and audio recorded critique sessions, conducted semi-structured interviews and collected artifacts throughout production including storyboards, brainstorms and rough and final cuts of videos.

Findings

Throughout critique, young video producers used argumentation strategies to cocreate meaning, multiple methods of inquiry and questioning, critically evaluated feedback and synthesized their ideas and those of their peers to achieve their intended artistic vision. Young video producers used feedback in the following ways: incorporated feedback directly into their work, rejected and ignored feedback, or incorporated some element of the feedback in a way not originally intended.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates how teaching the discourse of critique can be used to eliminate barriers for young people in gaining new media literacy skills. Educators can teach argumentation and inquiry strategies through using thinking guides that encourage active processing and through engaging near peer mentors. Classroom educators can integrate the arts-based practice of the pitch critique session to maximize the impact of peer-to-peer learning.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2019

A. Alegra Eroy-Reveles, Eric Hsu, Kenneth A. Rath, Alan R. Peterfreund and Frank Bayliss

Supplemental Instructions (SIs) were introduced into the San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering curriculum in 1999. The goal was to improve…

Abstract

Supplemental Instructions (SIs) were introduced into the San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering curriculum in 1999. The goal was to improve student performance and retention and to decrease the time to degree in STEM majors. While for the most part we followed the structure and activities as developed by the International Center for Supplemental Instruction at the University of Missouri, Kansas City, we discovered several variations that significantly improved our outcomes. First and foremost, we created SI courses that require attendance, which results in higher students’ performance outcomes compared to drop-in options. Second, at SFSU the SI courses are led by pairs of undergraduate student facilitators (who are all STEM majors) trained in active learning strategies. Each year, more than half of our facilitators return to teach for another year. Thus, each section has a returning “experienced” facilitator who works with a new “novice” facilitator. Third, the SI courses were created with a distinct course prefix and listed as courses that generate revenue and make data access available for comparison studies. Results are presented that compare SI impact by gender and with groups underrepresented in STEM disciplines.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Liz Cavallaro and William J. Nault

This paper aims to explore the cultivation of a learning culture in the US Navy (USN). The intent of preparing and sharing this research is to reveal the particular…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the cultivation of a learning culture in the US Navy (USN). The intent of preparing and sharing this research is to reveal the particular challenges of developing learning organization capability in national security organizations. This paper believes this effort will contribute to the evolution and establishment of learning organization models that are replicable across and adaptable to distinct industrial settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Several efforts were explored and assessed by applying relevant research in the learning organization literature to trends in current organizational practice within the USN.

Findings

Recent USN learning culture efforts align with the broader, multi-sector, global trend toward building learning organizations to develop people as a source of competitive advantage. This research reveals the trials of enabling learning organizations across large, hierarchical bureaucracies with substantial structural and cultural barriers. The myriad obstacles currently being addressed by the USN, both at an institutional level and at smaller organization and unit levels, can inform the development of learning cultures. In particular, this research highlights the need to align specific efforts to the appropriate level of the organization.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the learning organization conversation by examining the associated challenges through a multi-level framework – top, middle and bottom.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 July 2021

Rebecca Otten, Máille Faughnan, Megan Flattley and Samantha Fleurinor

Social innovation education aims to equip students with the skills and mindsets to pursue sustainable and just solutions to complex challenges, yet many programs fail to…

Abstract

Purpose

Social innovation education aims to equip students with the skills and mindsets to pursue sustainable and just solutions to complex challenges, yet many programs fail to address the power dynamics underlying unjust social structures. This paper aims to examine a social innovation course that integrates equity, diversity and inclusion principles through critical service-learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Researchers conducted semi-structured interviews of 25 students and 5 key informants in a qualitative, single case design to understand multiple perspectives on significant factors in transformative learning. Document review and auto-ethnographic insights provide additional case background.

Findings

Students identified the service experience as unique and high impact. Significant factors included the atypical service structure, the EDI framework, and the partner organization as an exemplar in the field. Students displayed a spectrum of learning, from recall and comprehension to critical evaluation, new worldviews, and behavior change.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this qualitative study pertain to one partnership but are generalizable to theories. These findings are plausibly transferable to other experiential social innovation courses embedded in elite, private, predominately white research universities.

Originality/value

This empirical case examines a unique pedagogical and curricular innovation. By seeking to understand factors and outcomes of experiential learning, this study contributes to the literature on social innovation education and critical service-learning. The analysis produced novel insights for faculty and institutions aiming to integrate equity, diversity, and inclusion goals into social innovation programs.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Barry J. Gledson and David Greenwood

British construction industry KPI data collected over recent years shows a trend in projects exceeding their time schedules. In 2013, the UK Government set a target for…

Downloads
2602

Abstract

Purpose

British construction industry KPI data collected over recent years shows a trend in projects exceeding their time schedules. In 2013, the UK Government set a target for projects timeframes to reduce by 50 per cent. Proposed interventions included more rapid project delivery processes, and consistent improvements to construction delivery predictions, deployed within the framework of 4D Building Information Modelling (BIM). The purpose of this paper is to use Rogers’ Innovation Diffusion theory as a basis to investigate how this adoption has taken place.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 97 construction planning practitioners were surveyed to measure 4D BIM innovation take-up over time. Classic innovation diffusion research methods were adopted.

Findings

Results indicated an increasing rate of 4D BIM adoption and reveal a time lag between awareness and first use that is characteristic of this type of innovation.

Research limitations/implications

Use of a non-probability sampling strategy prevents the results being generalisable to the wider construction population. Future research directions and methods are suggested, including qualitative investigations into decision-making processes around 4D BIM, and case studies exploring the consequences of 4D BIM adoption.

Practical implications

Recommendations of how to facilitate the adoption of 4D BIM innovation are proposed, which identify the critical aspects of system compatibility and safe trialling of the innovation.

Originality/value

This paper reinforces 4D BIM as an innovation and records its actual UK industry adoption rate using an accepted diffusion research method. By focusing on UK industry-wide diffusion the work also stands apart from more typical research efforts that limit innovation diffusion exploration to individual organisations.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Bradley Fidler

The purpose of this paper is to understand the emerging challenges of cybersecurity governance by analyzing the internet’s early history.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the emerging challenges of cybersecurity governance by analyzing the internet’s early history.

Design/methodology/approach

Tracing the design and management of early internet and network security technologies in the USA in the 1970s and 1980s.

Findings

The US Department of Defense separated the research and management regimes for networks and network security, with the latter restricted to military networks. As such, the absence of cybersecurity technologies on the early internet was not an oversight, but a necessary compromise. This ordering of networks and security had enduring technological, political and even cultural consequences, which are breaking down today.

Social implications

Political, technological and metaphoric distinctions between networks and security should be challenged; cybersecurity will transform internet governance.

Originality/value

New historical sources and analysis provide a novel perspective on contemporary challenges of cybersecurity governance.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Pauletta Marie Irwin, Robin A. Brown and Sonia Butler

Higher education organisations have the need and capacity to meet the expectations of industry partners to develop practice-ready graduates. Altered social and fiscal…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education organisations have the need and capacity to meet the expectations of industry partners to develop practice-ready graduates. Altered social and fiscal constraints have implications for the health workforce and, as such, decisions about how best to prepare undergraduate students should be considered. The purpose of this (conceptual) paper is to present the undergraduate simulation framework that has been designed to promote a standardised delivery of simulation, enabling graduates to have a higher capacity to meet workforce needs.

Design/methodology/approach

Education and simulation literature were explored to inform the development of the undergraduate simulation framework. A working knowledge of accreditation standards of health professions was key in designing a framework that could be applied across disciplines.

Findings

The framework encompasses tenets of a learner-centred pedagogy as well as professional and simulation standards. Experiential learning, behaviourism and social constructivism are viewed as foundational pillars when developing and delivering a simulation and have been considered in developing the framework. Other constructs of the undergraduate simulation framework are prebriefing, debriefing, repetition in the form of simulation cycles and the roles of student and educator.

Practical implications

It is recommended that this framework be incorporated into undergraduate health programmes to enhance student learning and potentiate the transference of knowledge and skills to the clinical setting.

Originality/value

The undergraduate simulation framework was developed to contribute to education and simulation research literature specific to health programmes to enhance student learning in readiness for the clinical environment.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2020

Tessa Withorn, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Anthony Andora, Cristina Springfield, Dana Ospina, Maggie Clarke, George Martinez, Amalia Castañeda, Aric Haas and Wendolyn Vermeer

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

Downloads
6485

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2019.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 370 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested as a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

1 – 10 of 32