Search results

1 – 7 of 7
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 December 2019

Erik Cohen and Samuel Spector

This paper aims to briefly review the history and future expectations for space tourism.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to briefly review the history and future expectations for space tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

Historical review.

Findings

After a series of successes in space travel, culminating by the Apollo 11 Moon landings in 1969, governmental efforts at space travel stalled. In the early twenty-first century, private entrepreneurs inspired new life into space travel and tourism, offering commercial suborbital trips, but none have as yet actually taken place. However, despite impediments, a significant expansion of space travel and tourism is expected to occur in the course of the twenty-first century.

Originality/value

The paper offers a synoptic view of past and projected future developments in space travel and tourism.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 75 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Erik Cohen and Sam Spector

Abstract

Details

Space Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-495-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Abstract

Details

Space Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-495-9

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Space Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-495-9

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Keith A. Abney

New technologies, including artificial intelligence (AI), have helped us begin to take our first steps off Earth and into outer space. But conflicts inevitably will arise…

Abstract

New technologies, including artificial intelligence (AI), have helped us begin to take our first steps off Earth and into outer space. But conflicts inevitably will arise and, in the absence of settled governance, may be resolved by force, as is typical for new frontiers. But the terrestrial assumptions behind the ethics of war will need to be rethought when the context radically changes, and both the environment of space and the advent of robotic warfighters with superhuman capabilities will constitute such a radical change. This essay examines how new autonomous technologies, especially dual-use technologies, and the challenges to human existence in space will force us to rethink the ethics of war, both from space to Earth, and in space itself.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Larry J. Paxton

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of past experience in managing risk and technical innovation in NASA space programs with lessons learned for new unmanned

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of past experience in managing risk and technical innovation in NASA space programs with lessons learned for new unmanned space missions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines past performance of space missions and abstracts the lessons learned for the efficient development of cost‐effective space missions.

Findings

The paper finds that large organizations build and internalize a culture at odds with risk taking and the rapid deployment of innovative solutions. Actualized management goals are often at odds with the issues that determine or insure the long‐term survival of an organization. A key issue is the management of knowledge within that system: the extrinsic knowledge of the technologies as well as the intrinsic knowledge associated with the perception and acceptance of risk.

Research limitations/implications

Innovation can be seen as being dangerous to the organization. That perception must be managed. The NASA culture that is applicable to human spaceflight may not serve the community or the organization as well when applied to unmanned missions.

Practical implications

The paper provides a simplified and brief perspective on the issues inherent in managing a change in culture in an organization that has a highly public mission.

Originality/value

While the NASA “faster, better, cheaper” program has been considered elsewhere, this paper focuses on the lessons that are applicable to the management of space missions and the development of new, cost‐effective programs. These lessons retain their value, as the new administrator Michael D. Griffin attempts to manage the transition of NASA from an organization that has been in maintenance mode to one that must embrace innovation and stay within a highly constrained funding profile.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

1 – 7 of 7