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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Neale J. Slack and Gurmeet Singh

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of service quality on customer satisfaction and loyalty and the mediating role of customer satisfaction in the…

2553

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of service quality on customer satisfaction and loyalty and the mediating role of customer satisfaction in the supermarket sector.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 480 supermarket customers participated in an intercept survey in four urban centres of Fiji. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the level of service quality provided by supermarkets, and inferential statistics to determine the gap between customer's service quality expectations and perceptions and to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The findings indicate service quality of supermarkets is perceived as being unsatisfactory, service quality significantly affects customer satisfaction and loyalty and customer satisfaction partially mediates the relationship between service quality and customer loyalty reducing customer's perceptions of service quality, leading to lower customer loyalty.

Practical implications

This study provides an indication as to where supermarkets should target their marketing attention and scarce corporate resources and may help in their efforts to service, satisfy, retain and attract more long-term loyal customers in the increasingly competitive supermarket sector. This research could inform government policy makers in sequencing the supermarket sector transformation and assist local supermarkets to adapt to this changing retail landscape.

Originality/value

This study advances our understanding of the effect of service quality on customer satisfaction and loyalty and the mediating role of customer satisfaction in the supermarket sector.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 July 2021

Gurmeet Singh, Neale J. Slack, Shavneet Sharma, Asheefa Shaheen Aiyub and Alberto Ferraris

This study examines the influence of service quality dimensions (food quality, physical environment quality and employee service quality) and brand image of fast-food…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the influence of service quality dimensions (food quality, physical environment quality and employee service quality) and brand image of fast-food restaurants on price fairness and its consequence on customer retention.

Design/methodology/approach

This survey collected 331 responses using the public intercept method. Data analysis involved performing confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on the measurement model, followed by structural equation modeling. Moderation analysis was performed using SPSS (model1 in process macro), while mediation was performed using model 4 in process macro.

Findings

Empirical results of this study revealed the positive effect of restaurant service quality dimensions on price fairness and price fairness on customer retention. It also revealed that brand image strengthened the restaurant service-quality/price fairness interrelationship, and that customer satisfaction partially mediated the price fairness/customer retention interrelationship.

Research limitations/implications

Findings of this study are useful to marketers and fast-food restaurateurs in establishing the right combination of service quality dimensions and brand image that increase perceptions of price fairness and increase customer satisfaction and retention.

Originality/value

This study contributes to advancing the theoretical foundations of customers' perceived price fairness and retention research, specifically in the understudied fast-food sector of emerging economies. It extends the application of the equity theory to expose the direct and indirect influences on customer perceived price fairness and customer retention. The findings provide a better understanding of price fairness perceptions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2021

Shavneet Sharma, Neale Slack, Kritika Devi, Tuma Greig and Samantha Naidu

With the increasing popularity of online games like Pokémon Go, a new wave of crowdsourcing communities have emerged, allowing gamers to collaborate, communicate and share…

Abstract

Purpose

With the increasing popularity of online games like Pokémon Go, a new wave of crowdsourcing communities have emerged, allowing gamers to collaborate, communicate and share useful game-related information. This paper aims to examine the factors that influence gamers' crowdsourcing behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework is developed that combines the DeLone & McLean model, self-determination theory, and different levels of engagement behaviour. The online survey collected 371 responses that were analysed using Covariance Based Structural Equation Modelling (CB-SEM).

Findings

The results show that extrinsic and intrinsic motivation positively influenced gamers' crowdsourcing engagement intention. System quality and information quality were also confirmed to be positively associated with gamers' crowdsourcing engagement intention. Furthermore, crowdsourcing engagement intention was found to be positively associated with crowdsourcing content consumption, contribution, and creation.

Practical implications

The findings of this study are useful for the owners of Pokémon Go and other gaming-related crowdsourcing platforms in devising tailored strategies to increase the crowdsourcing engagement of gamers.

Originality/value

This study provides the first empirical evidence of factors motivating online gamers' crowdsourcing intention. This study also presents novel insight into online gamers' crowdsourcing intention by combining diverse theories which offer different perspectives and a more comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon. Contribution to the research on the intention-behaviour gap by modelling three behavioural outcomes (content creation, contribution, and consumption behaviour) of crowdsourcing engagement intention, is another important contribution of this study.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2021

Gurmeet Singh, Neale Slack, Shavneet Sharma, Karishma Mudaliar, Suman Narayan, Rajini Kaur and Keshmi Upashna Sharma

This study aims to simultaneously examine the interrelated influence of antecedents involved in developing fast-food restaurant customer loyalty. A conceptual model which…

1618

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to simultaneously examine the interrelated influence of antecedents involved in developing fast-food restaurant customer loyalty. A conceptual model which incorporates service quality attributes, price fairness, customer satisfaction, brand image and trust and the resultant effect on customer loyalty is proposed to better understand how fast-food restaurant customer loyalty can be optimized.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research methodology adopting structural equation modelling was used to understand the interrelatedness and influence of antecedents involved in optimizing fast-food restaurant customer loyalty.

Findings

The findings indicate that service quality attributes (food quality and employee service quality) and price fairness significantly influence customer satisfaction and brand image, while physical environment quality has no significant influence. Additionally, customer satisfaction was found to influence brand trust and customer loyalty, while the brand image does not influence customer satisfaction but does influence brand trust and customer loyalty.

Practical implications

Understanding the interrelatedness and influence of antecedents involved in developing fast-food restaurant customer loyalty would enable academics and practitioners to formulate honed marketing and operational strategies to optimize customer loyalty and fast-food restaurant profitability.

Originality/value

This research addresses the paucity of research and marketing gaps regarding the interrelatedness and influence of antecedents involved in optimizing fast-food restaurant customer loyalty in Small Island Developing States (SIDS).

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Neale Slack, Gurmeet Singh and Shavneet Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the impact of customer perceived value and its dimensions on customer satisfaction in a developing country, and…

1787

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the impact of customer perceived value and its dimensions on customer satisfaction in a developing country, and practical suggestions for marketing strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey collected data from five-hundred supermarket customers in Fiji. SPSS was used to provide descriptive and inferential analysis.

Findings

Results reveal that customer perceived value (CPV) has a positive impact on customer satisfaction; and functional value (price/value for money) has more positive impact than social value, emotional value has a negative impact and functional value (performance/quality) has no significant impact on customer satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Considering this research was undertaken in the supermarket sector of only one country, other researchers are urged to replicate this research in Fiji and other developing countries, to yield further insight into the context-specific nature of CPV.

Practical implications

It is suggested that marketers note these findings (to understand better the conceptualisation and context-dependent nature of CPV, its dimensional interrelationships and its impact on customer satisfaction) in order to enhance CPV and ultimately customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study makes several contributions to research on CPV by providing insight into how developing country customers perceive the value of supermarkets from a construct and multidimensional perspective, the inter-relatedness of CPV dimensions and the impact of CPV and its dimensions on customer satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 August 2020

Neale Slack, Gurmeet Singh and Shavneet Sharma

This paper aims to examine the effect of service quality dimensions and customer satisfaction on customer repurchase intention, word-of-mouth, complaining behaviour and…

2153

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of service quality dimensions and customer satisfaction on customer repurchase intention, word-of-mouth, complaining behaviour and price sensitivity, as well as the effect of service quality dimensions on customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A public intercept survey collected data from 480 supermarket customers. Statistical package for the social sciences was used to provide descriptive and inferential analysis.

Findings

Results reveal the predominance and magnitude of effect of empathy positively on customer satisfaction, customer repurchase intention and word-of-mouth, and negatively on customer complaining behaviour and price sensitivity. Customer satisfaction also significantly affects these customer loyalty and disloyalty dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted in the supermarket sector of only one country.

Practical implications

Insights have been provided to increase customer satisfaction and customer loyalty outcomes, and negate customer disloyalty outcomes, in the supermarket sector.

Originality/value

This study provides suggestions to supermarket executives regarding the significance of empathetic, customer-oriented behaviour by front-line supermarket service employees.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Neale J. Slack, Gurmeet Singh, Jazbeen Ali, Reshma Lata, Karishma Mudaliar and Yogita Swamy

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of fast-food restaurant service quality (compound effect of food quality, physical environment quality and employee…

2739

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of fast-food restaurant service quality (compound effect of food quality, physical environment quality and employee service quality) and its dimensions (when acting independently) on customer perceived value, satisfaction and behavioural intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 400 fast-food restaurant customers in Fiji using a public-intercept survey. The study used descriptive and inferential analysis. This research also used backward elimination multiple regressions to test the hypotheses of this study.

Findings

The compound effect of fast-food restaurant service quality dimensions on customer perceived value revealed food quality and physical environment quality are significant determinants of customer perceived value, however employee service quality is not. In contrast, the effect of the fast-food service quality dimensions acting independently on customer perceived value revealed the three dimensions are significant determinants of customer perceived value. Results also confirmed that customer perceived value is a significant determinant of customer satisfaction and customer satisfaction is a significant determinant of behavioural intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This study highlights to fast-food restaurateurs and marketers the importance of determining the compound effect of fast-food restaurant service quality dimensions, delivering the right combination of fast-food restaurant service quality dimensions to customers and not singling out dimensions in an attempt to enhance restaurant service quality.

Originality/value

This study makes important contributions towards understanding the compound effect of fast-food restaurant service quality dimensions and the independent effect of these dimensions on the formation of customer perceived value, customer satisfaction and behavioural intentions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2018

Irem Demirkan

The purpose of this paper is to propose that the resources that a firm owns and has full control (firm-level resources) and resources that a firm access through direct…

2095

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose that the resources that a firm owns and has full control (firm-level resources) and resources that a firm access through direct connection with other firms (network-level resources) will impact firm innovation when effectively deployed by the firm. While previous research examined these factors separately, the author takes a holistic view and looks into their effects on innovation simultaneously. The author also introduces the moderating effects, i.e. the variables that can enhance firm innovation through their interaction with internal and external resources.

Design/methodology/approach

The author tested the role of financial resources and slack resources in the form of cash slack and human slack at the firm level, and network size, network tie strength, and network diversity at the network level on the firm innovation. Using generalized negative binomial model with Huber-White procedure, the author analyzed 306 firms from the biotechnology industry over a span of 17 years.

Findings

The analysis suggests that cash slack impact innovation negatively. However, this link is moderated by firm size such that for large firms cash slack affects innovation positively. Network-level resources all positively impact innovation and have more economic impact on firm innovation than firm-level resources. Furthermore, although human slack negatively affects innovation, its interaction with network size enhances innovation.

Originality/value

The research makes important contributions to both strategic management and innovation literatures especially when, the author considers the role of firm-level slack in driving firm innovation. Previous research reported conflicting findings about the availability of slack resources and firm performance. The results showed that the relationship between slack resources and firm innovation is negative and significant, both for available slack and human slack. This finding parallels with previous research which reported that constraints such as lack of slack resources can actually facilitate innovation. The author also contributes to the literature by introducing boundary conditions which can enhance firm innovation through their interaction with firm-level internal and network-level external resources. In this respect, to the author’s knowledge, this is among the first studies to combine the slack literature focusing on firm-level resources with the literature on network-level resources.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Murad A. Mithani and Ipek Kocoglu

The proposed theoretical model offers a systematic approach to synthesize the fragmented research on organizational crisis, disasters and extreme events.

Abstract

Purpose

The proposed theoretical model offers a systematic approach to synthesize the fragmented research on organizational crisis, disasters and extreme events.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper offers a theoretical model of organizational responses to extreme threats.

Findings

The paper explains that organizations choose between hypervigilance (freeze), exit (flight), growth (fight) and dormancy (fright) when faced with extreme threats. The authors explain how the choice between these responses are informed by the interplay between slack and routines.

Research limitations/implications

The study’s theoretical model contributes by explaining the nature of organizational responses to extreme threats and how the two underlying mechanisms, slack and routines, determine heterogeneity between organizations.

Practical implications

The authors advance four key managerial considerations: the need to distinguish between discrete and chronic threats, the critical role of hypervigilance in the face of extreme threats, the distinction between resources and routines during threat mitigation, and the recognition that organizational exit may sometimes be the most effective means for survival.

Originality/value

The novelty of this paper pertains to the authors’ use of the comparative developmental approach to incorporate insights from the study of individual responses to life-threatening events to explain organizational responses to extreme threats.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Allen C. Amason and Ann C. Mooney

Research into the antecedents of TMT conflict has become increasingly popular in light of the effects that conflict can have on strategic decision making and…

1797

Abstract

Research into the antecedents of TMT conflict has become increasingly popular in light of the effects that conflict can have on strategic decision making and organizational performance. Of course, such performance becomes a part of the contextual backdrop against which future decisions are made. Thus, organizational performance is itself an important antecedent of TMT conflict. Using data drawn from the TMTs of 44 mid‐sized public firms, we demonstrate that cognitive and affective conflict relate differently to past performance. The implications of this research for efforts to effectively manage conflict during strategic decision making are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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