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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2018

Muhammad Talha Salam, Nazlida Muhamad and Vai Shiem Leong

Research on Muslim consumers has increasingly highlighted the significance of measuring religiosity. However, there is an apparent lack of uniformity in measuring…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on Muslim consumers has increasingly highlighted the significance of measuring religiosity. However, there is an apparent lack of uniformity in measuring religiosity across literature on Muslim consumer research. This paper aims to critically review the approaches used to measure religiosity in existing research on Muslim consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviewed 39 studies selected from the Journal of Islamic Marketing from 2010 to 2017. Based on critical reviews of these studies on Muslim consumers, a number of observations and recommendations were made on approaches to measure religiosity.

Findings

Evident influence of religiosity on Muslim consumers was observed across the spectrum of the reviewed studies. The main issues in selecting the measures of religiosity include limited discussion on rationalizing the choice of a particular measure of religiosity and little consideration of the Islamic context.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the review, it is recommended that the process of searching, selecting and adopting a particular religiosity construct should be rationalized based on Islamic context. Adoption of Western scales should be done carefully with expert reviews. Also, researchers may consider using Islamic religiosity constructs and alternative measures such as qualitative measures of religiosity and spirituality-based constructs.

Originality/value

As Muslim consumer research is gaining momentum, this paper presents a critical review of the important aspect of measuring religiosity among Muslim consumers. The critical review and recommendations in this paper offer a much-needed theoretical clarity on selecting and using religiosity measures.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Nazlida Muhamad, Vai Shiem Leong and Normalisa Md Isa

This paper aims to model consumers’ decision to use halal logo on packaged food products. The model primarily tests the importance of country of origin (COO) of a halal…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to model consumers’ decision to use halal logo on packaged food products. The model primarily tests the importance of country of origin (COO) of a halal logo as an indicator for assessing credibility of a halal logo, and its relevance in consumers’ decision to use the logo in packaged food purchase.

Design/methodology/approach

A data set from a survey of 559 respondents from two countries was used to test eight hypotheses that were developed based on a modified theory of planned behaviour framework, using partial least squares procedures.

Findings

Halal certification logo was found to have COO effect on consumers’ evaluation during purchase decision of food items. Consumer uses information on the COO of a halal logo to assess the logo’s credibility in delivering the halal food standard. The construct, along with the constructs of religiosity and its interaction terms, subjective norms and attitude, explains consumers’ intention to consider the halal logo during packaged food purchase.

Research limitations/implications

Generalization of the findings is limited to the packaged food industry and to the consumer groups surveyed in the two countries.

Practical implications

There is a need for marketers to recognize Muslim consumers’ sensitivity towards the origin of a halal logo in choosing the right logo for their products. Logo certifiers may want to consider adopting marketing strategies to market their certification as a credible marker of a halal food standard.

Originality/value

The effect of COO of halal logo and its influence on consumers’ decision to use the logo in purchase decision are new to the literature.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Nazlida Muhamad, Munirah Khamarudin and Waida Irani Mohd Fauzi

Religion as a cultural element has the potential to drive a strong boycott campaign. Previous studies acknowledge the role of religion in consumer boycotts yet did not…

Abstract

Purpose

Religion as a cultural element has the potential to drive a strong boycott campaign. Previous studies acknowledge the role of religion in consumer boycotts yet did not investigate its role in influencing the very core of consumers’ motivation to participate in religion-based boycott. The purpose of this paper is to explore the fundamental nature of religious influence in an international religion-based consumer boycott. The research model tests the role of intrinsic religious motivation as the root of Muslim consumers’ motivational factors to participate and their intention to boycott US food brand.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted the Hoffman’s’ (2013) consumer boycott model to test the hypotheses. Survey method is used to collect primary data from Muslim millennials in a northern state of Malaysia. The study tested its five hypotheses on a data set of 325 cases using structural equation modelling (partial least squares regression).

Findings

The findings support the primary role of religion influences underlying boycott motivation factors. The intrinsic religious motivation is related to all the four boycott’s motivation factors (i.e. attitudes towards boycotting the brand, subjective norms, make a difference, self-enhancement), and indirectly contributing to intentions to boycott US food brand through the constructs of self-enhancement, subjective norms and attitudes towards the boycott.

Research limitations/implications

The study is a cross-sectional in nature, confined to one US food brand. The findings may be limited to Muslim millennials in the same region or similar cultural background of the country surveyed.

Practical implications

Businesses may want to consider working with social agencies involved in a religion-driven consumer boycott in mitigating negative influences of such boycott on brands.

Originality/value

The study shows the root of consumers’ motivation to participate in an international religion-based consumer boycott, i.e. intrinsic religious motivation, by illustrating the mechanisms of religious influences (i.e. intrinsic religious motivation) on consumers’ intention to participate in Islam-driven boycott.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2021

Shahidul Islam and Nazlida Muhamad

The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) has been recognized as a “gold standard” set of “practical standardized measures” for…

Abstract

Purpose

The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) has been recognized as a “gold standard” set of “practical standardized measures” for assessing hospital service quality. Beginning with the HCAHPS, the purpose of this paper is to extend efforts to assess patient-centered communication (PCC) and the quality of healthcare and presents a scale for measuring patient perceptions and expectations of service quality in an emerging economy context.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered survey of patients in private hospitals (N = 171) was conducted to test the proposed framework. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to establish the measurement model. Multiple regression analysis was used to explain the scale's predictive ability. ANOVA was used to analyze service quality gaps and rank patients' priorities.

Findings

Five components of PCC are identified. Among these, nurse affective communication has a significant positive effect on patient satisfaction. The gap analysis shows that patients have high expectations for doctors' affective communication, while they perceive a low level of service performance in the realm of nurse affective communication. The study highlights a new means of measuring “reliability” in healthcare. Important findings on patients' priorities are evaluated and discussed.

Practical implications

Healthcare organizations and practitioners can improve patient-centered care by stressing the dimensions of PCC, including clinicians' affective and instrumental communication.

Originality/value

The study expands the understanding of HCAHPS instruments in an emerging economy context and opens avenues for more widespread use of the measures. The research contributes to the literature on patient-centered care and healthcare service quality by proposing a scale for managing specific practices and interactions in healthcare.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2010

Nazlida Muhamad Hashim and Dick Mizerski

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of fatwa and the dissemination of fatwa rulings among Muslim consumers using two studies. Results from these studies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of fatwa and the dissemination of fatwa rulings among Muslim consumers using two studies. Results from these studies show that contemporary fatwa often extend beyond Muslims' religious beliefs and practices. By advising Muslims on the brands and product categories that are permissible and prohibited for consumption, fatwa rulings can cause boycotts and bans of products or brands.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analyses are performed in Study 1 to explore the types of fatwa rulings that are declared by the Malaysian fatwa authorities. In Study 2, a survey instrument is used to collect responses from Muslims regarding their sources of fatwa ruling for two products, their religious motivation and gender. Cluster analysis and an independent χ2‐test are used to test the study's predictions.

Findings

Fatwa rulings in the area of social issues and economics have a known tendency to affect Muslim consumers' marketplace behavior. Muslim consumers tend to acquire information on more controversial fatwa rulings through less formal sources, compared to less controversial fatwa rulings. Several clusters of Muslim consumers were found to have their sources of fatwa associated with the product category, gender of respondent, and religious orientation.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to Malaysian Muslim University students and Malaysia's fatwa system. This use of young Malaysian Muslims probably restricts the findings to this cohort, rather than the general population of Malaysian Muslims.

Practical implications

The paper offers insights into how fatwa rulings affect marketplace behaviors and how information sources are accessed and fatwa information is disseminated among Muslim consumers. The findings lead to suggestions on how marketers can manage fatwa rulings concerning their products.

Originality/value

The paper provides an understanding of the nature and types of fatwa rulings circulating in the Muslim world, and identifies factors related to Muslims' knowledge of fatwa rulings.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Nazlida Muhamad, Vai Shiem Leong and Dick Mizerski

This study aims to provide insights on the influence of Muslim consumers’ knowledge on products subjected to contemporary fatwa ruling and their subsequent cognitive and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide insights on the influence of Muslim consumers’ knowledge on products subjected to contemporary fatwa ruling and their subsequent cognitive and behavioural responses.

Design/methodology/approach

MANOVA and MANCOVA were used to examine the influence of religious orientation on young Malaysian Muslims’ product knowledge, and the extent of religious orientation and gender on Muslim consumers’ attitude and behaviour towards three contemporary fatwa rulings of products.

Findings

Respondents’ religious orientation differentiates their knowledge on fatwa prohibition ruling of selected brand and behaviours. Consumers’ religious orientation and gender explain consumers’ behavioural responses to variables of the Theory of Planned Behaviour for three behaviours. Evidence suggests that ruling types affects (conditional and unconditional) consumers’ responses.

Research limitations/implications

Greater insights are provided on Muslims’ motivation to search information of controversial products, and their subsequent perception and behavioural reactions to controversial products. Findings are limited to the Malaysian Muslim consumers.

Practical implications

The fact that contemporary fatwa reached young Muslim generations indicates that managers have to be wary of fatwa to predict Muslim consumers’ marketplace behaviours.

Social implications

A significant number of young Malaysian Muslims are keeping abreast with contemporary fatwa. This suggests that they received an early and substantial exposure to Islamic way of life through their socialisation.

Originality/value

This study offer insights into the understandings of the young Muslim generation regarding contemporary fatwa on products, and revealed significant findings in relation to consumer product knowledge and religious influences on consumer behaviour.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2010

Nazlida Muhamad and Dick Mizerski

There is limited conceptual and theoretical knowledge among marketers and practitioners regarding the measurement of religious influences in consumer market‐place…

Abstract

Purpose

There is limited conceptual and theoretical knowledge among marketers and practitioners regarding the measurement of religious influences in consumer market‐place behaviours. The purpose of this paper is to review religious factors that appear to influence buyer and consumer behaviour in the light of findings from marketing and religious psychology.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilises academic databases to search for marketing and religious psychology papers that deal with influences of religion and constructs that have been suggested to mediate them. Findings from religious psychology are utilised as the backbone for understanding religious influence. The paper also compares and groups terminologies and concepts used in marketing studies, suggesting a holistic view of religion and factors that may mediate religious influences on consumers' market‐place behaviours.

Findings

Five factors of religious influence have been identified. These are commitment, motivation, affiliation, knowledge about a religion and awareness of the social consequences of following a religion. The characteristics, importance and applications of these factors are discussed.

Originality/value

The paper applies knowledge from the area of religious psychology to offer a holistic view in understanding factors that tend to mediate religious influences on consumer behaviours.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2019

Nuradli Ridzwan Shah Mohd Dali, Shumaila Yousafzai and Hanifah Abdul Hamid

The purpose of this paper is to develop an Islamic religiosity measurement which can be applied in many various sectors and fields.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an Islamic religiosity measurement which can be applied in many various sectors and fields.

Design/methodology/approach

The religiosity measurement developed by the authors had undergone systematic qualitative and quantitative approaches taking into consideration the expert opinion survey in ensuring the measurement content validity and reliability.

Findings

The study found that Islamic religiosity measurement is multi-dimensional. The dimensions found were beliefs and commitment or practice.

Research limitations/implications

The research limitation of the study is that the research is in its exploratory stages and needs to be replicated and to be tested in different contextual settings.

Originality/value

The instrument was developed through a rigorous systematic database search, qualitative and quantitative scale development stages which can be used as the basis in measuring Islamic religiosity.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Naveed Iqbal Chaudhry, Sajawal ali Mughal, Javed Iqbal Chaudhry and Usman Tariq Bhatti

This study aims to check the impact of consumer ethnocentrism (CE) and animosity on brand image (BI) and brand loyalty (BL) of Indian made cosmetic products in Pakistan…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to check the impact of consumer ethnocentrism (CE) and animosity on brand image (BI) and brand loyalty (BL) of Indian made cosmetic products in Pakistan and to check the mediation role of product judgment (PJ) related to Indian made cosmetic products in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the researcher used quantitative techniques to collect data. Online survey strategy was used for data collection and the technique of purposive sampling was used to select 280 consumers as respondents of said study. SPSS-20 and AMOS-21 were used for data analysis and to test the hypotheses of the study.

Findings

The results indicate that there is a positive relationship between CE and BL that is the novel result of this study because past studies proved negative relation in CE and BL and there is no direct relationship between CE and BI. The results also indicate that consumer animosity (CA) has a negative impact on BI and BL of Indian made cosmetic products in Pakistan. The results of mediation indicate that PJ is playing partial mediation in this relation.

Originality/value

This study is for the first time that is conducted in the context of India and Pakistan. Similarly, PJ is tested as a mediator for the first time in the relationship between CE and CA and BI and BL. This study would be beneficial for foreign brands generally and for Indian cosmetic brands specifically. In addition, it may provide help to business students and scholars to further understand and explore these variables in the context of developing countries.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Norazah Mohd Suki and Abang Sulaiman Abang Salleh

Muslim consumers’ tendency to patronize stores with Halal images and purchase genuine Halal products is closely related to their effort to maintain Islamic identity, and…

Abstract

Purpose

Muslim consumers’ tendency to patronize stores with Halal images and purchase genuine Halal products is closely related to their effort to maintain Islamic identity, and this is further supported by many empirical data. Therefore, this paper aims to examine the relationships between attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and Halal principle knowledge and their effect on Muslim consumers’ behavioral intention to patronize retail stores. On top of that, the mediating effect of Halal image on these relationships is also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were analyzed using multiple and hierarchical regression analysis to test the model via the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software among 480 valid samples of Muslim consumers.

Findings

Empirical results of the hierarchical regression analysis and the Sobel test revealed that there is a significant mediating effect of Halal image on the relationship between consumers’ attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control of consumers’ behavioral intention to patronize retail stores. Consumers with high attentiveness of the stores’ Halal image have a positive impression of the stores, a high motivation to patronize and, without any conditions, may follow through their intention to patronize the retail stores.

Practical implications

This research study offers guidelines to the retailers, marketers and the authorities in enhancing marketing strategies and the implementation of stricter Halal consumption laws. Hence, this research puts forward the following strategies: adopting Halal marketing strategy, promoting Halal images in retail stores and reinforcing Halal principle knowledge in the mind of consumers.

Originality/value

The main theoretical contribution relates to the insertion of the Halal image as a mediating variable in the matter of Muslim consumers’ behavioral intention to patronize Halal stores in Malaysia. An inspection of the effect of Halal principle knowledge on Muslim consumers’ behavioral intention to patronize retail stores is also rewarding.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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