Search results

1 – 10 of over 5000

Abstract

Institutional structures of professional career paths often support breadwinner–homemaker families, with a stay at home wife available full time to support the professional (and children), so the professional can devote complete energy and time to developing a career. This research examines how two partners in the same narrowly structured, fast track occupational culture such as those occurring for dual military officer couples shape how women and men negotiate decision making and life events. Data from interviews with 23 dual U.S. Navy officer couples build upon Becker and Moen’s (1999) scaling back notions. With both spouses in these careers, placing limits on work is extremely difficult due to fast track cultures that demand higher status choices and structures that formally do not reliably consider collocations. Trading off occurs, but with distress due to the unique demands on two partners in the fast track culture, which means career death for some. Two partners in fast track careers may not yet have given up on two careers as many peers may have, but they lose a great deal, including time together and their desired number of children. But they ultimately posit individual choice rather than focusing on structural change. The pressured family life resulting is likely similar to that for partners in other narrowly structured, fast track cultures such as in law firms and academia.

Details

Visions of the 21st Century Family: Transforming Structures and Identities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-028-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Joseph G. San Miguel, John K. Shank and Donald E. Summers

Recently, leasing has been prominent in the press due to the Air Force’s recent ill-fated attempt to obtain the use of Boeing re-fueling tankers. Forgotten is that, in the…

Abstract

Recently, leasing has been prominent in the press due to the Air Force’s recent ill-fated attempt to obtain the use of Boeing re-fueling tankers. Forgotten is that, in the early 1980’s, a highly controversial Navy long-term leasing program of Maritime Prepositioned Ships had a different result. However, an unintended consequence of the Navy’s success was that future government leases were practically eliminated. This research examines the issues and parties involved in this unprecedented creative and innovative leasing program for ships used by the Navy’s Military Sealift Command. While the analysis concludes that the Navy’s leasing program was successful and cost effective, laws and policies were changed so that long-term leasing is no longer viable for the strategic financing of military requirements. The case is presented here that existing laws and regulations should be reconsidered so that leased military resources can once again be used to provide and maintain national security.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Rene G. Rendon

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of contract management process maturity assessments in the US Navy using a process capability maturity model. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of contract management process maturity assessments in the US Navy using a process capability maturity model. The maturity model is used to benchmark an organization’s contract management process maturity and to use the assessment results to develop a road map for implementing process improvement as well as knowledge-sharing initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

This is survey-based research on benchmarking contract management processes in the US Navy. A web-based assessment tool was deployed to US Navy contracting officers located at aeronautical systems, sea systems, and logistics support contracting agencies. The assessment tool consists of survey items related to the use of contracting best practices. The survey responses are then used to calculate the agency’s contract management process maturity level.

Findings

The benchmarking results reflected higher maturity levels in the pre-award contracting processes (Procurement Planning, Solicitation Planning, and Source Selection), while lower maturity levels were reflected in the post-award contracting processes (Contract Administration and Contract Closeout). The research findings related to process capability enablers also reflected higher mean scores for the pre-award processes and lower mean scores for the post-award processes. These maturity levels and process capability enabler scores reflect the extent of the implementation of contracting best practices within the Navy contracting agencies.

Research limitations/implications

This research uses a purposeful sampling approach designed to acquire data on organizational contract management processes. The assessment survey was administered only to qualified Navy contracting officers. The Navy contracting agencies are responsible for procuring billions of dollars in supplies and services in support of the Navy mission. Although the assessed contracting agencies procure different types of systems, supplies, and services, the contract management processes used are common to all Navy, Army, Air Force, and other US federal government agencies. The conclusions based on the analysis of these benchmarking assessments may be applicable to Department of Defense (DoD) and other government agencies.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that benchmarking can be effective in measuring and improving contracting process capability within the Navy. Benchmarking contracting processes can have far-reaching effects throughout the DoD. The Under Secretary of Defense’s has mandated initiatives related to improving both pre- and post-award contracting processes. The use of these benchmarking assessments can be instrumental in tracking the achievements of these process improvement initiatives. Additionally, the US Congress is leading the push for auditability in procurement operations. By benchmarking and improving its contracting processes, the DoD will be winning the battle toward integrity, accountability, and transparency of its financial operations.

Social implications

Benchmarking contracting processes can also have far-reaching effects in society. Many governments are focussing on integrity, accountability, and transparency in public procurement. International organizations such as Transparency International (TI) have identified process capability and process integrity as key for reducing the potential for procurement-related fraud, waste, and abuse. Additionally, NATO member countries and partner nations are focussing on the value of assessing and improving procurement processes for strengthening transparency and accountability. The value of benchmarking and improving contracting processes is gaining much attention in global public procurement agencies as they strive for accountability, integrity, and transparency in their governance processes.

Originality/value

There are multiple reports on deficiencies in DoD’s contract management processes, identifying poor contract planning, and Contract Administration as just some of the critically deficient areas. In response, the DoD is increasing its emphasis on developing its workforce competence through education initiatives. However, very little attention is being paid to benchmarking contract management processes. This research reflects the value of benchmarking DoD’s contract management process maturity and using the results for implementing process improvement initiatives. Using process benchmarking data, agencies can identify process improvement initiatives that will ensure government tax dollars are spent in the most effective and efficient ways.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

K.J. Euske, Joseph San Miguel and Chong Wang

This research examines how the cost performance of defense contracts varies among the Air Force, Army, Navy, and the Department of Defense (DoD) and among five major…

Abstract

This research examines how the cost performance of defense contracts varies among the Air Force, Army, Navy, and the Department of Defense (DoD) and among five major defense contractors: Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, and General Dynamics. Data for these analyses was extracted from the recently established Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval (DAMIR) web-based interface for management information on Major Defense Acquisition Programs (MDAP). Note that, in addition to the three military services, MDAP data is also reported for DoD itself.

Data analysis indicates that the Navy ranks last among the military services and DoD in cost performance for MDAP contracts, while the Air Force ranks best. Of the defense contractors, Raytheon ranks last in cost performance and General Dynamics is next to last. Furthermore, the Navy contracts more frequently with Raytheon and General Dynamics than do the other services or DoD. Explanatory factors for poor cost performance may be due to factors such as the Navy's lack of oversight, the quality of the acquisition workforce, the defense contractors’ cost inefficiency, ethical lapses, or weak corporate governance, or combinations of these factors.

In addition, the schedule performance data was also identified. Tests of statistical significance on the schedule performance difference generally yield no results except for one relationship which indicates that the Navy is more likely to have Acquisition Program Baseline (APB) schedule breaches than its counterparts. Finally, cost performance data is examined for statistically significant differences between the two major categories of defense contracts: fixed-price contracts and cost-plus contracts. However, no significant findings were discovered.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-754-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Past theorizing and empirical work suggest that long-standing strategic leaders generate harmful attention and information-processing effects in their organizations, which in turn impair organizational learning and performance. In contrast, our argument is that longevity and its attendant inertia foster useful transformational and strategic persistence for organizations pursuing stretch goals. Through attentional vigilance and restricted focus, inertia may create the cognitive profile necessary for effective learning when organizations pursue the seemingly impossible. We empirically examine our ideas in the context of the French royal navy and the naval battles it had with the British in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. More specifically, we focus on two distinct but related stretch periods during which the French royal navy was tasked with building a powerful naval force and using it to gain naval supremacy over Great Britain. Given its exceptionally weak starting position at the beginning of the two studied periods and its desire to displace the established and advantaged navy of the era, the French had a lofty task. Our results are supportive of the stability argument, with leader longevity and inertia being positive for outcomes.

Content available
Article

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ian Mann, Warwick Funnell and Robert Jupe

The purpose of this paper is to contest Edwards et al.’s (2002) findings that resistance to the introduction of double-entry bookkeeping and the form that it took when…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contest Edwards et al.’s (2002) findings that resistance to the introduction of double-entry bookkeeping and the form that it took when implemented by the British Government in the mid-nineteenth century was the result of ideological conflict between the privileged landed aristocracy and the rising merchant middle class.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws upon a collection of documents preserved as part of the Grigg Family Papers located in London and the Thomson Papers held in the Mitchell Library in Sydney. It also draws on evidence contained within the British National Archive, the National Maritime Museum and British Parliamentary Papers which has been overlooked by previous studies of the introduction of DEB.

Findings

Conflict and delays in the adoption of double-entry bookkeeping were not primarily the product of “ideological” differences between the influential classes. Instead, this study finds that conflict was the result of a complex amalgam of class interests, ideology, personal antipathy, professional intolerance and ambition. Newly discovered evidence recognises the critical, largely forgotten, work of John Deas Thomson in developing a double-entry bookkeeping system for the Royal Navy and the importance of Sir James Graham’s determination that matters of economy would be emphasised in the Navy’s accounting.

Originality/value

This study establishes that crucial to the ultimate implementation of double-entry bookkeeping was the passionate, determined support of influential champions with strong liberal beliefs, most especially John Deas Thomson and Sir James Graham. Prominence was given to economy in government.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Daniel P. Kinstler, Raymond W. Johnson, Anke Richter and Kathryn Kocher

The Navy Nurse Corps is part of a team of professionals that provides high quality, economical health care to approximately 700,000 active duty Navy and Marine Corps…

Abstract

Purpose

The Navy Nurse Corps is part of a team of professionals that provides high quality, economical health care to approximately 700,000 active duty Navy and Marine Corps members, as well as 2.6 million retired and family members. Navy Nurse Corps manpower management efficiency is critical to providing this care. This paper aims to focus on manpower planning in the Navy Nurse Corps.

Design/methodology/approach

The Nurse Corps manages personnel primarily through the recruitment process, drawing on multiple hiring sources. Promotion rates at the lowest two ranks are mandated, but not at the higher ranks. Retention rates vary across pay grades. Using these promotion and attrition rates, a Markov model was constructed to model the personnel flow of junior nurse corps officers.

Findings

Hiring sources were shown to have a statistically significant effect on promotion and retention rates. However, these effects were not found to be practically significant in the Markov model. Only small improvements in rank imbalances are possible given current recruiting guidelines. Allowing greater flexibility in recruiting practices, fewer recruits would generate a 25 percent reduction in rank imbalances, but result in understaffing. Recruiting different ranks at entry would generate a 65 percent reduction in rank imbalances without understaffing issues.

Practical implications

Policies adjusting promotion and retention rates are more powerful in controlling personnel flows than adjusting hiring sources. These policies are the only means for addressing the fundamental sources of rank imbalances in the Navy Nurse Corps arising from current manpower guidelines.

Originality/value

The paper shows that modeling to improve manpower management may enable the Navy Nurse Corps to more efficiently fulfill its mandate for high‐quality healthcare.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jay Chatzkel

In this conversation, Alex Bennet explores the operating principles and practices of how the Knowledge Centric Organization was developed at the US Department of the Navy

Abstract

In this conversation, Alex Bennet explores the operating principles and practices of how the Knowledge Centric Organization was developed at the US Department of the Navy. Ms Bennet served as the Chief Knowledge Officer for the US Department of the Navy from 1998 to 2002, where she pioneered and designed and led the development of the Navy’s enterprise‐wide Knowledge Centric Organization (KCO) effort. The US Department of the Navy was the only public sector organization to be recognized as a world class leader in managing knowledge to deliver superior performance in the 2002 North American Most Admired Knowledge Enterprise (MAKE) study.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Aruna Apte, Uday M. Apte and Rene G. Rendon

Services acquisition in the US Department of Defense (DoD) has continued to increase in scope and dollars in the past decade with over $200 billion spent for services in…

Abstract

Services acquisition in the US Department of Defense (DoD) has continued to increase in scope and dollars in the past decade with over $200 billion spent for services in 2008. In this empirical study, we conducted a web-based survey to collect primary data on management practices in services acquisition in the U. S. Navy and studied such areas as contract characteristics, management approaches, and program management issues. The paper presents summary results of our survey, implications of current management practices, and recommendations useful for improving services acquisition in the Navy.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

1 – 10 of over 5000