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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Elan Sasson, Gilad Ravid and Nava Pliskin

Although acknowledged as a principal dimension in the context of text mining, time has yet to be formally incorporated into the process of visually representing the…

Abstract

Purpose

Although acknowledged as a principal dimension in the context of text mining, time has yet to be formally incorporated into the process of visually representing the relationships between keywords in a knowledge domain. This paper aims to develop and validate the feasibility of adding temporal knowledge to a concept map via pair-wise temporal analysis (PTA).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a temporal trend detection algorithm – vector space model – designed to use objective quantitative pair-wise temporal operators to automatically detect co-occurring hot concepts. This PTA approach is demonstrated and validated without loss of generality for a spectrum of information technologies.

Findings

The rigorous validation study shows that the resulting temporal assessments are highly correlated with subjective assessments of experts (n = 136), exhibiting substantial reliability-of-agreement measures and average predictive validity above 85 per cent.

Practical implications

Using massive amounts of textual documents available on the Web to first generate a concept map and then add temporal knowledge, the contribution of this work is emphasized and magnified against the current growing attention to big data analytics.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a novel knowledge discovery method to improve a text-based concept map (i.e. semantic graph) via detection and representation of temporal relationships. The originality and value of the proposed method is highlighted in comparison to other knowledge discovery methods.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Celia T. Romm and Nava Pliskin

The changing role of technology in the virtual workplace has been accompanied by a proliferation of research activity focusing initially on the technical aspects and, more…

1028

Abstract

The changing role of technology in the virtual workplace has been accompanied by a proliferation of research activity focusing initially on the technical aspects and, more recently, on the social and political aspects of the diffusion process, including power and politics. This paper builds on the work of Kling and Markus on power and politics in IT, extending it to e‐mail and more specifically, to the use of e‐mail for petty tyranny. Reviews the literature on petty tyranny and its implications to IT and e‐mail. Presents a case study in which e‐mail was used by a department chair to manipulate, control, and coerce employees. The discussion links the events in the case with the literature on petty tyranny. In conclusion, demonstrates that e‐mail features make it amenable to political abuse and elaborates on the more general, theoretical, practical and ethical implications from this research.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Celia Romm and Nava Pliskin

Past research on electronic mail (e‐mail) has established this information technology as an effective means for achieving intra‐ and inter‐organizational co‐ordination…

1330

Abstract

Past research on electronic mail (e‐mail) has established this information technology as an effective means for achieving intra‐ and inter‐organizational co‐ordination. Current research on e‐mail has gone beyond the technical aspects of implementation to the non‐technical, namely, the social aspects. This paper follows the current trend by considering the role of leadership in diffusion and implementation of e‐mail. A case study which describes the introduction of e‐mail to a university community, is presented. The diffusion of e‐mail was strongly supported by the charismatic president of the university and was a technical success. It was, however, followed by a series of political events that undermined the leadership of the president. The discussion focuses on how leadership theories, paritcularly current theories on charismatic leadership, can explain the technical success of the project and its turbulent political side‐effects. The conclusions outline implications for managers and information systems practitioners.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Gali Naveh, Dorit Tubin and Nava Pliskin

To study the implementation of a learning content management system (LCMS) at one department of a university in light of Rogers' diffusion of innovation (DOI) theory and…

525

Abstract

Purpose

To study the implementation of a learning content management system (LCMS) at one department of a university in light of Rogers' diffusion of innovation (DOI) theory and in comparison to known critical success factors (CSFs) in implementation of information systems.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was used to examine the implementation process.

Findings

Under authority decision to adopt the system throughout the department, the diffusion was quick and without resistance, not in line with authority adoption decision in Rogers' DOI theory. Some of the CSFs found are consistent with implementation CSFs mentioned in the literature.

Research limitations/implications

To complement the qualitative research, quantitative research is needed regarding administrative measures taken in implementation processes at other academic departments and the success in terms of system adoption.

Originality/value

Successful LCMS implementation in an academic environment is rather rare and studying the successful authority decision in this case is of value to researchers and to practitioners. To adopt the system might imply that administrative measures could expedite implementation in other academic institutions.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Nava Pliskin

Despite advances in information technology, telecommuting, or work away from the workplace (at home, on the road, etc.) via low‐bandwidth telephone lines, remains an…

2120

Abstract

Despite advances in information technology, telecommuting, or work away from the workplace (at home, on the road, etc.) via low‐bandwidth telephone lines, remains an inhibited phenomenon. High bandwidth communication available at the workplace, on the other hand, enables members of virtual teams to collaborate with peers and share information and knowledge despite being dispersed at several work locations. Members of virtual teams thus substitute real proximity to information resources and to knowledgeable peers with virtual proximity and are better positioned for effective group collaboration than telecommuters. The “telecommuting paradox” is that, despite enormous improvements in IT, the prevalence of telecommuting is lower than expected. In an attempt to shed light on the paradox, focuses on the infrastructural factors that have affected telecommuting throughout its history.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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