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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2007

Christopher Shaffer

This paper aims to discusses the importance of Native American literature in library collections.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discusses the importance of Native American literature in library collections.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on research of recent articles.

Findings

The paper identifies many good titles on Native Americans that deserve to be in libraries so that the history and culture of Native Americans will be available to all users.

Practical implications

Libraries should identify good quality books on Native Americans and by Native Americans to add to their collections. Many are now available so that it is not difficult to find appropriate ones that reflect contemporary views of Native Americans.

Originality/value

This paper pulls together a good deal of recent information on books by and about Native Americans as well as pointing to some excellent collections.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Book part
Publication date: 10 October 2014

Roy F. Janisch

In this chapter, the author outlines the historical, legal, and jurisdiction regarding incarceration rates of Native Americans. It examines reports and data in areas where…

Abstract

Purpose

In this chapter, the author outlines the historical, legal, and jurisdiction regarding incarceration rates of Native Americans. It examines reports and data in areas where problems of racial disparity continue to endure. As the smallest minority population in the United States, it raises questions as to the disparity of Native Americans. Native Americans are unique in their relationship with the federal government, and should be critically examined to distinguish what makes their involvement in the criminal justice system inimical.

Design/methodology/approach

The author examines the law enforcement, courts, and corrections data, through various reports; concerning causes of Native American criminality, incarceration rates, health disparities, jurisdictional schemes, human rights, and race. It is argued that federal governmental laws and various bureaucracies exacerbate conditions through overreaching policies which invalidates many of the positive aspects Native People bring to themselves.

Findings

Native Americans are overrepresented in the criminal justice system. As the smallest segment of the population, they have a higher incarceration rate per capita. It is without question that chronic underfunding of law enforcement, courts, and corrections in reservation communities continues. In light of Congressional claiming to want to alleviate problems in Indian country, little impact has been realized.

Originality/value

Native American societies are often considered a silent minority. Information pertaining to the many social issues enveloping Native communities often falls on deaf ears and political party leaders who are more interested in a larger constituency fail to lend their assistance in a manner deemed appropriate to truly grasp the larger problems.

Details

Punishment and Incarceration: A Global Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-907-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Rhonda Harris Taylor

Provides an introduction to basic Web‐based resources relevant for locating information and identifying other resources that are useful in addressing frequently asked…

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699

Abstract

Provides an introduction to basic Web‐based resources relevant for locating information and identifying other resources that are useful in addressing frequently asked questions about topics and issues centered on Native Americans.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Book part
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Jameson D. Lopez

The rate of Native Americans attending institutions of higher education is much lower (24 percent) in comparison to their White peers (48 percent) (Ross et al., 2012)…

Abstract

The rate of Native Americans attending institutions of higher education is much lower (24 percent) in comparison to their White peers (48 percent) (Ross et al., 2012). This chapter explores factors that contribute to the accessibility of higher education for Native American students (e.g., family, institutions, communities, and academic influences.) The extreme differences in the rate of Native Americans attending institutions of higher education are not attributed to one single problem. However, this chapter argues that it is imperative to see that an accumulation of experiences influence higher education accessibility and in order to increase the attendance of Native Americans in colleges and universities, a multifaceted approach informed by Tribal Critical Theory must be used.

Details

Culturally Sustaining and Revitalizing Pedagogies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-261-6

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Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2006

Emily Clark

The question of how to address copyright's insufficiencies with respect to Native American creative production is at the center of an ongoing legal debate; however, more…

Abstract

The question of how to address copyright's insufficiencies with respect to Native American creative production is at the center of an ongoing legal debate; however, more important is whether Native American oral forms should be protected by copyright. Although some late twentieth-century court decisions have opened the door for courts to consider including intangibles within intellectual property law, copyright is not the answer to the problem of protecting Native American oral traditions from appropriation. Expanding the scope of copyright to envelop Native American oral traditions is antithetical to the creation and function of these forms within their host communities and would do more harm than good.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-387-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Loriene Roy

Native peoples living within their cultures find themselves the focus of increased attention and are renewing their own ties in a cultural renaissance. Non‐Natives are…

Abstract

Native peoples living within their cultures find themselves the focus of increased attention and are renewing their own ties in a cultural renaissance. Non‐Natives are becoming more intrigued with both scholarly and popular interpretations of some aspects of Native cultures. Those Native Americans living outside the culture are trying, in varying degrees, to recover old ways, thus attempting to reverse generations of assimilation. It is with the latter group that this article is concerned: the non affiliated Native Americans who are intellectually and/or spiritually as well as physically removed from traditional teachings. What kinds of assistance can libraries provide to Native Americans wishing to reclaim their cultural legacy?

Details

Collection Building, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2015

Beverly J. Klug

There is a long history of school failure for Aboriginals1 in the U.S. educational system. Culturally relevant/responsive pedagogy affords opportunities for Aboriginal…

Abstract

There is a long history of school failure for Aboriginals1 in the U.S. educational system. Culturally relevant/responsive pedagogy affords opportunities for Aboriginal students to achieve academic success through building upon their cultural heritages and Native ways of knowing. School systems adopting this pedagogy empower Indigenous students to connect with essential knowledge for academic success in today’s world. This enhanced pedagogy creates classrooms of involvement that promote Aboriginal students’ achievement. Preservice teachers employing this pedagogy will experience success with their Indigenous students and learn about Aboriginal communities, lifeways, and values. Mutual respect is engendered as long-perpetuated negative stereotypes of Native Americans are undone. Culturally relevant/responsive pedagogy can be tailored to specific populations by incorporating their own Aboriginal knowledge, languages, and practices into teaching praxis.

Details

International Teacher Education: Promising Pedagogies (Part B)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-669-0

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2021

Anthony J. Stone and Carol Rambo

Using a semi-autoethnographic layered account format, we present the voices of 16 Native American adults as they talk about their lives and Native American Caricature…

Abstract

Using a semi-autoethnographic layered account format, we present the voices of 16 Native American adults as they talk about their lives and Native American Caricature Iconography (NACI). First, we explore their impressions and lived experiences with “racial formation projects” such as tribal identification cards, blood quantum calculations, genocide, child removal, boarding schools, and reservations, to contextualize why some Native Americans interpret NACI as much more than “an honor,” “tradition,” or “just good fun.” Next, we explore the Native Americans' perceptions of sports mascots, cartoons, and sculpture, after exposing them to a series of eight images of NACI. We conclude that NACIs are racial formation projects as well. By unmindfully producing and consuming NACI, we fail to interrupt and reform the racial formation projects that continue to define us all.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Luma AlMasarweh and Carol Ward

This study aims to provide a better understanding of Native American women veterans’ experiences with Veteran Administration and Indian Health Services. Eighteen…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide a better understanding of Native American women veterans’ experiences with Veteran Administration and Indian Health Services. Eighteen interviews were conducted with special attention to the quality and quantity of health and mental health care services veterans accessed, the barriers and local contextual factors in accessing and utilizing services, and potential solutions to service gaps for women veterans from two Montana reservations, the Northern Cheyenne Reservation and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation.

Methodology/approach

We examine the barriers and needs of Native American veterans in both reservations using qualitative methods. The research analyzed 18 interviews with women veterans from the Northern Cheyenne and Flathead reservations.

Findings

Native American women veterans identified a number of barriers to accessing care, some of which include lack of information regarding eligibility and the types of services available. Women often found the application process to be confusing and difficult. Other barriers included distance, cost of travel, and conflicts with their work schedule.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory case study served to clarify the challenges and obstacles Native American women veterans experience with accessing health and mental health services. This research revealed several patterns and themes in the experience of Native American women veterans in both reservation communities when attempting to access and seek care at Veterans Administration (VA) facilities and Indian Health Services (IHS). This research calls for policy changes and research to clarify how resources can be more efficiently and effectively distributed to rural veterans.

Originality/value

Little research has addressed the needs of Native American veterans. American Indians and Alaska Natives serve at a higher rate in the U.S. military than any other population. This research provides important information about Native American veterans who are often underrepresented in survey research, yet a rapidly growing segment of the United States military and veteran population.

Details

Special Social Groups, Social Factors and Disparities in Health and Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-467-9

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Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2003

Barbara M Altman and Elizabeth K Rasch

Now that the threat of infectious disease is under control among the Native American population, the prevalence of chronic disease and occupational illness has become the…

Abstract

Now that the threat of infectious disease is under control among the Native American population, the prevalence of chronic disease and occupational illness has become the focus of concern, particularly in relation to associated mortality and morbidity. This analysis addresses the issue of disability as caused by chronic illness, accidents and occupational illness among native populations and provides prevalence estimates of disability as measured by functional and activity limitations. The analysis also provides a description of the socioeconomic situation among Native Americans with various impairments and limitations. Compared to whites, blacks and persons of other races, Native Americans report the highest levels of impairment and functional and activity limitations. Overall, 32% report some type of limitation. As for those of all other races, the rates of prevalence increase with age and are associated with low levels of education and income. However, the rates among the youngest age group of Native Americans are greater whether examining physical limitations or task/activity limitations. Logistic regression analysis indicates that when controlling for all the characteristics commonly associated with limitations and impairment, race continues to be a predictor of both physical and task/activity limitations, with Native Americans 29% more likely to report some form of limitation.

Details

Using Survey Data to Study Disability: Results from the National Health Survey on Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-007-4

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