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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Alison James, Siobhan Chadwick and David Rushforth

Support, time and recovery (STR) workers are in the vanguard of the new frontline, non‐professionally affiliated groups identified in the NHS Plan (Department of Health…

Abstract

Support, time and recovery (STR) workers are in the vanguard of the new frontline, non‐professionally affiliated groups identified in the NHS Plan (Department of Health, 2000).Since 2003, the former changing workforce programme mental health team (now part of NIMHE's national workforce programme) have facilitated the implementation of this role across England, initially through a pilot project, then an accelerated development programme (ADP). It is this latter, ongoing, programme that forms the basis of this article. The authors refer to the challenge of establishing the STR worker role in a variety of statutory, non‐statutory and independent service settings and achieving the Department of Health (DH) target of 3000 STR workers in post by December 2006. The collaborative implementation process is discussed and many issues such as performance management, measures, service user involvement, organisational (including human resources and occupational health) support, and education and training, are explored. Key learning from the process is identified, and consideration given to the future application of such a simple yet effective model for change.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2008

Effie Amanatidou

The present paper aims to explore the potential of joint foresight exercises in serving joint programming, a concept highlighted in furthering the creation of the European

Abstract

Purpose

The present paper aims to explore the potential of joint foresight exercises in serving joint programming, a concept highlighted in furthering the creation of the European Research Area (ERA).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper starts with setting the context, i.e. the ERA concept, and the importance of joint programming. It then explores the potential of joint foresight in serving joint programming. This is done by analysing the current situation of trans‐national foresight based on the EFMN pool of foresight exercises. Then, possible modes and issues of trans‐national foresight collaboration, as well as perceived benefits and challenges, are also examined in setting a framework for foresight collaboration.

Findings

Joint foresight is not carried out in a fully fledged mode, yet but both interest and potential is high. A framework for foresight collaboration can already be set. EFMN is a valuable source of information and also holds a central, synergistic and complementary role in relation to other sources in defining the way to go forward in joint foresight.

Research limitations/implications

The framework for foresight collaboration can form the basis for strategic discussions across EU member states as well as for further research to clarify and enrich understanding of the governing conditions and variables.

Originality/value

The paper proves that EFMN is both a significant pool of information and holds a complementary role in defining the way forward in supporting joint programming under the ERA. The foresight collaboration framework first attempted here is also worth exploiting further.

Details

Foresight, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Abstract

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Government and Public Policy in the Pacific Islands
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-616-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Ann Gorry and Tom Dodd

This paper reviews the work of the national dual diagnosis programme established in England in response to recommendations for improvements in the way that services treat…

Abstract

This paper reviews the work of the national dual diagnosis programme established in England in response to recommendations for improvements in the way that services treat people with mental health problems and substance misuse issues. National policy drivers are explained, as well as the aims and achievements of the programme to date.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Nana Yaw Oppong

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the management development (MD) programme in the Ghanaian mining industry. A legal requirement aimed at equipping national

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the management development (MD) programme in the Ghanaian mining industry. A legal requirement aimed at equipping national managers for eventual takeover of the management of industry from expatriates, the programme is analysed to ascertain the willingness to implement and the state of implementation by multinational companies operation in the industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs critical discourse analysis (CDA), a problem-identification and problem-solving analytical tool to identify any obstacles suppressing the implementation and possible ways past the obstacles. Data for analysis were collected from 26 national managers from industry who were interviewed to gather views and expectations on their development.

Findings

Key findings include domination and hegemonic dynamics of expatriates through sustained power over the control of the MD process, CDA’s emancipatory power succeeds in identifying unrealised possibilities for tackling the MD problem for a social change (development of national managers) in industry, and non-implementation of the MD programme contributed by expatriates, the government of Ghana, and senior national managers.

Social implications

The programme has the potential of developing national managers for eventual takeover from expatriates, but requires implementing the law to the latter, including denying foreign subsidiaries mining lease if they fail to provide the adhere to localisation plans.

Originality/value

The paper extends literature on management of Western multinational subsidiaries in developing countries, revealing power and control over human resource practices, and MD in their foreign subsidiaries. It also contributes to literature on suppression of indigenous employees by other indigenous employees (the “colonised elites”), contrary to what is expected from indigenous people towards the development of their colleagues.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Jennifer Davis, Debra Lee, Kate Jarvis, Helen Zorbas and Sally Redman

Despite evidence showing the benefits of early diagnosis of breast cancer many Australian women delay seeking advice when they find a change in their breast. This paper…

Abstract

Despite evidence showing the benefits of early diagnosis of breast cancer many Australian women delay seeking advice when they find a change in their breast. This paper describes the process evaluation of a national programme to encourage women to see their general practitioner within three months of finding a breast change. The programme used a partnership approach involving different sectors of the community to deliver an inexpensive national programme with sustainable community components. The programme included strategies to promote messages through the news media, television commercials, community meetings across Australia and general practitioner based strategies. This paper reports on a process evaluation of the implementation of the programme; outcome measures will be available at a later stage.

Details

Health Education, vol. 103 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Helen Chalmers, Peter Aggleton and Paul Tyrer

Alongside teachers, community nurses have been identified as having an important role to play in the provision of school‐based personal, social and health education (PSHE…

Abstract

Purpose

Alongside teachers, community nurses have been identified as having an important role to play in the provision of school‐based personal, social and health education (PSHE) and sex and relationships education (SRE). However, there currently exist few programmes of preparation for this work that recognise the specific contribution of community nurses to SRE. This paper reports on findings from a formative evaluation of a pilot certification scheme for community nurses involved in SRE provision and recently implemented in England. The evaluation sought specifically to access views about the value of the educational experience in preparing school nurses to better fulfil their SRE role.

Design/methodology/approach

During the implementation of the pilot scheme, 124 semi‐structured interviews were conducted with a range of stakeholders, including national players, local scheme support leads, nurses participating in the pilot scheme, nurse managers and other colleagues. Data gathering adopted a close‐focus, largely qualitative approach. Partial transcription took place and a thematic analysis was carried out using constant comparative method.

Findings

Findings suggest that a well‐designed scheme of the type described is likely to be well received by community nurses, but that ways need to be found to ensure good synergy between local health and education services in the support of SRE in schools. At the same time, there is a need to respect the unique contribution of community nurses and the skills that they bring to this work.

Originality/value

This paper raises awareness and highlights issues surrounding a pilot certification scheme for community nurses involved in sex and relationships in education.

Details

Health Education, vol. 106 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

N.C. Proudlove and R. Boaden

To consider how information and information systems can be used to support improving patient flow in acute hospitals (a key target for the National Health Service in…

Abstract

Purpose

To consider how information and information systems can be used to support improving patient flow in acute hospitals (a key target for the National Health Service in England), and the potential role of the National Programme for Information Technology currently being developed.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature plus past and present research, teaching and consulting experience with all levels of the National Health Service is drawn on to consider information provision and requirements.

Findings

The National Programme for Information Technology specifies many features designed to support improving patient flows, though timescales for implementation are longer than those for the pledged flow improvements, and operational use of this type of information system has been problematic in the National Health Service.

Research limitations/implications

The work is limited to the National Health Service and information systems in use and planned for it. The National Health Service access targets, flow improvement initiatives and the National Programme for Information Technology apply primarily to England.

Practical implications

Some bed/flow management information systems currently in use incorporate tools and capabilities in advance of what is outlined in the National Programme for Information Technology, and some rare cases of culture changes in information system use have been achieved. One should learn from these to inform development and implementation of National Programme systems. These existing information systems and approaches may also be useful to hospitals considering systems prior to implementation of the National Programme for Information Technology.

Originality/value

There has been very little consideration of the use of operational information and information systems for bed/flow management in the literature. Development and implementation of National Programme for Information Technology systems should build from an understanding of the practice and context of bed/flow management.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2019

Richard E.A. Ashu and Dewald Van Niekerk

A new framework to support the national and local capacity building plan for disaster risk management (DRM) in Cameroon is presented. For the past 30 years, after the…

Abstract

Purpose

A new framework to support the national and local capacity building plan for disaster risk management (DRM) in Cameroon is presented. For the past 30 years, after the general re-organisation of the civil protection department, capacity building programmes for DRM has been solely carried out for and by the Ministry of Territorial Administration and the Department of Civil Protection. The exclusion of businesses, civil society and community participation, among others, has been the main obstacle to capacity building programmes undertaken for DRM. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on interviews conducted among 200 informants by means of a process of participatory monitoring and evaluation as well as a duo capacity building workshop for DRM held in August 2017 in Yaoundé, this paper evaluated existing capacity building programmes for DRM in Cameroon.

Findings

Findings show that the greater portion of government representatives within the public administration lack capacity to address DRM initiatives at the local and national levels of governance. While recommending DRM programmes as a necessity for integration within civil administrative curriculum, this paper proposes six elements to address capacity building gaps for DRM in Cameroon.

Originality/value

The results demonstrate critical gaps in capacity building aimed at DRM, especially where single ministry or department monopolises DRM. The findings provide the government with a useful tool to review its national strategy for a disaster reduction policy and the drawing up of a national intervention plan.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

John Connolly

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the paper considers the level of congruence between contribution analysis and public value. Second, based on the Scottish…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the paper considers the level of congruence between contribution analysis and public value. Second, based on the Scottish context, the paper examines how contribution analysis can be used as a method to support public managers to demonstrate value within partnership contexts in times of acute governance challenges (including in times of austerity).

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical underpinning of the paper emerges from strands of applied public sector experience and consultancy with national agencies. The author was a public manager (up to 2013) within a national government agency – NHS Health Scotland. The research is also informed by data gathered as an academic consultant in contribution analysis with national partnership-based agencies (Healthcare Improvement Scotland and Education Scotland, 2013-present) through a series of workshops as part of consultancy activity on capacity building in relation to evaluation methodology and practice.

Findings

Based on research and experience with three national public sector agencies in Scotland, the paper demonstrates how public managers, despite difficult challenges, have adopted contribution analysis and how this has served to facilitate public value.

Originality/value

In a time when public managers are facing acute challenges in demonstrating the impact of their programmes and services due to the dynamics of complex governance systems coupled with the pressure of austerity, this research helps to equip public managers with strategies to enable the demonstration of public value in pragmatic terms.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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