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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Natalya Sergeeva and Naomi Liu

The purpose of this paper is to re-visit social construction of technology (SCOT) framework in understanding of innovation in the construction sector and unpack the role…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to re-visit social construction of technology (SCOT) framework in understanding of innovation in the construction sector and unpack the role of innovation brokers in this context.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper adopting SCOT framework to understand innovation in the context of the construction sector. The role of innovation brokers is unpacked in the paper, currently under-explored in the construction innovation studies.

Findings

The authors suggest SCOT framework as a useful overarching frame through which to understand construction innovation. The authors argue that innovation brokers should be positioned to oversee the interface of multiple social groups.

Research limitations/implications

Further empirical research is proposed to test the theoretical assumptions outlined in the paper. The research agenda is to conduct further empirical research adopting a socio-technical theoretical lens and appropriate qualitative or mixed-design methodologies. There are other socio-technical theoretical frameworks that could be used to explore socio-technical interactions in different ways, e.g. socio-technical systems theory, sociomateriality, actor-network theory, etc.

Practical implications

Three propositions are developed regarding the position of an innovation broker from the perspectives of multi-social-groups interfaces, shifting significance of the roles of innovation broker and the collaboration with government.

Originality/value

The authors outline the value of SCOT framework for innovation study within project-based construction sector. The authors contribute to better understanding of the role of innovation brokers in the system of construction innovation.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Natalya Sergeeva and Meri Duryan

This paper aims to explore the ways innovation becomes enabled through knowledge management and sharing which has important implications for establishing and sustaining…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the ways innovation becomes enabled through knowledge management and sharing which has important implications for establishing and sustaining the culture of innovative thinking in project-based construction firms. This study adopts a reflective practitioner perspective to explore this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 30 semi-structured interviews were conducted with the construction sector professionals whose roles are most relevant in the connection between innovation and knowledge management. Thematic analysis and cognitive mapping techniques were used to analyse the interview data.

Findings

The research findings indicate that due to the complexity of project-based construction firms, a more holistic approach to knowledge management and organisational learning at the firm level is required. This would enable a culture of continuous and coordinated knowledge flow that facilitates innovation and continuous improvement in project-based firms.

Practical implications

This paper has important implications for practising managers in project-based construction firms. By better understanding the ways organisational knowledge can be managed to become an enabler of innovation would allow to build and enhance firms’ innovative capabilities, individual and team competencies. There is a real need for innovation knowledge managers as formal job positions in the construction sector.

Originality/value

This study contributes to construction innovation and project management research and practice by providing insights into establishing and sustaining the culture of learning and innovative thinking.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Maria Luz Gulino, Natalya Sergeeva and Graham Winch

The project organising literature has increasingly paid attention to the dynamic capabilities required for the development of projects. The current research aims to expand…

Abstract

Purpose

The project organising literature has increasingly paid attention to the dynamic capabilities required for the development of projects. The current research aims to expand the dynamic capabilities framework by including owner capabilities required throughout the whole project life cycle.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses an interpretive qualitative research approach. Nineteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with the key actors of a social infrastructure project.

Findings

The findings suggest that the expansion of the dynamic capabilities framework to include owner capabilities required throughout a project life cycle could positively impact the success of a project. “Transformational capabilities” are recommended to enable the owner to overcome challenges and lead the evolution towards project organisations that are capable of transforming its outputs into beneficial use.

Originality/value

Existing research on dynamic capabilities does not address the particular challenges of social infrastructure projects such as housing. The current research fills this gap by exposing the challenges experienced by owners in the development of certain capabilities and their impact on the performance of a project.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2019

Natalya Sergeeva

The purpose of this paper is to explore the governance in project organising where owner organisations interface with the temporary project organisations that they…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the governance in project organising where owner organisations interface with the temporary project organisations that they initiate. This interface between the two types of organisation represents an opportunity for innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 25 narrative interviews were conducted with managers who work in permanent owner and operator organisations and temporary project organisations. It is combined with the analysis of textual narratives represented in institutional reports (APM, IPA, PMI).

Findings

The findings show that it is the flexible and balanced approach to governance that allows innovation to emerge. Strong capable innovative owners play crucial role in creating the corporate governance framework to allow innovation in projects.

Research limitations/implications

The current research presents narratives voiced by senior managers in permanent owner and operator organisations and temporary project organisations. The ways governance can be adjusted through the life cycle of major programmes require further a more longitudinal research investigation.

Practical implications

The practical benefits for the project management community is a better understanding of corporate governance in owner and operator organisations, the role of leadership and their narratives in governing processes, and the impact of strong governance on organisational performance and project deliverables.

Social implications

Senior managers socially constructed the meaning of governance through narratives. The author learn about practices of governance through the perspectives of those involved in decision making.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to project management theory in two ways: it provides insight into the practice of corporate governance; and it develops the application of narrative enquiry to project management research.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Natalya Sergeeva

The purpose of this paper is to explore how an “innovation champion” identity is formulated in the context of UK construction sector. A conceptual model of “innovation…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how an “innovation champion” identity is formulated in the context of UK construction sector. A conceptual model of “innovation champion” themes is derived from the literature on social identity and then validated through empirical research.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 30 semi-structured interviews have been conducted with UK construction sector practitioners. The sample was composed active participants within the Constructing Excellence – the UK construction sector’s network-type organisation for driving innovation.

Findings

Practitioners socially constructed “innovation champion” identities through narratives about “self” or others. While some practitioners saw themselves as “innovation champions”, many others recognised CEOs as such. “Innovation champions” are commonly recognised as key individuals who promote innovations across businesses.

Practical implications

Socially constructed identities are seen important to strategic decisions and future actions. The potential contribution to practice is to help current and new generations of practitioners to learn about how to be or become “innovation champions”.

Social implications

The concept of social identity presents opportunities to enrich our understanding of the “innovation champion” label can stimulate people’s reflections on who they are and what they do.

Originality/value

The present paper has extended upon prior research and theory by exploring the ways practitioners perceive themselves or others as “innovation champions”. While this research has focused on the UK construction sector, the findings are potentially useful for other sectors where “innovation champion” labels are commonly used.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

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315

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

A social identity frame through which to understand the role and creation of an “innovation champion” can provide useful results. Rather than relying on more conventional notions of what an “innovation champion” is, social identity literature can help understand the process behind the role. This in turn can hopefully allow those who see themselves as “innovation champions” to become more attuned to the function of the role, as well as helping new generations become “innovation champions” themselves.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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