Search results

1 – 9 of 9
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Natalie Ceeney

Describes the development of the British Library's services for researchers, business and the public.

Abstract

Describes the development of the British Library's services for researchers, business and the public.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Marina I. Mercado

Gives the highlights of the 2003 Charleston Conference, November 2003. Which focused on the future role and functionality of libraries, publishers and venders in…

Abstract

Gives the highlights of the 2003 Charleston Conference, November 2003. Which focused on the future role and functionality of libraries, publishers and venders in conceptualizing and packaging the future of intellectual content for libraries.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 January 2010

Judith Broady‐Preston

The purpose of this paper is to review the contemporary theories of professionalism, together with an assessment of the complex factors resulting in a fundamental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the contemporary theories of professionalism, together with an assessment of the complex factors resulting in a fundamental re‐examination of the nature and role of the information profession (IP) in contemporary society.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of strong structuration and social identity theories is suggested as a suitable methodological framework for determining the meaning of “professionalism” within the context of the contemporary IP.

Findings

The future of the IP is by no means assured, and further empirical studies need to be undertaken to map the extent of change and the degree to which this is a matter of concern.

Research limitations/implications

This paper outlines a suitable methodological approach for future studies, together with a review of key factors impinging on the contemporary IP.

Originality/value

This methodological framework has been utilised in related studies of cognate professions, but not thus far applied to IP.

Details

Library Management, vol. 31 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 November 2009

Judith Broady‐Preston

The purpose of this paper is to explore qualitative methodologies appropriate to a research project investigating the boundaries and scope of the information profession…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore qualitative methodologies appropriate to a research project investigating the boundaries and scope of the information profession, with specific reference to the skills/knowledge base and concepts of “professionalism”.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviewed and critically evaluated here are social theory frameworks, focusing particularly on Structuration theory.

Findings

Strong Structuration Theory either singly or in combination with Social Identity Theory, appears to offer a sound methodology to explore concepts of change, conflict and professional identity, from both micro and macro perspectives.

Research limitations/implications

Strong Structuration Theory stands as a powerful tool in discovering reconstituted “boundaries along which professions can build new strategies of legitimisation” and remake themselves.

Originality/value

This review provides a critical evaluation of some of the current methodologies available to help define professional expertise.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Peter Robinson and Betty Lowery

Abstract

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Abstract

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Mike McGrath

Reviews 156 journals and some electronic lists and newsletters for issues relevant to interlending and document supply. The review deals with: scholarly communication…

Abstract

Reviews 156 journals and some electronic lists and newsletters for issues relevant to interlending and document supply. The review deals with: scholarly communication, copyright, the British Library, e‐books, remote document supply, site licensing, search engines, open access, e‐journal usage and institutional repositories.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2017

Paul Cannon

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of professionalism within Library and Information Science (LIS) and in doing so draw comparisons with the education and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of professionalism within Library and Information Science (LIS) and in doing so draw comparisons with the education and medicine professions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a review of the extant literature from the three professions and gives a brief review of the theoretical constructs of professional knowledge using the work of Eisner and Eraut to explore knowledge types. It then relates these definitions to knowledge use within LIS, education and medicine, before examining the roles that professional associations have on the knowledge development of a profession. It concludes with a reflection on the future of professionalism within LIS.

Findings

The literature suggests a fragmented epistemological knowledge-base and threats to its practices from outside professions. It does, however, find opportunities to redefine its knowledge boundaries within the phronetic practices of LIS and in socio-cultural uses of knowledge. It finds strengths and weaknesses in professionalism within LIS and its practitioners.

Originality/value

This review provides a contemporary update to several earlier, related, works and provides useful context to current efforts to professionalise LIS by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Judith Broady‐Preston

The purpose of this paper is to explore concepts of professional education, development and training within the context of a changing information landscape

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore concepts of professional education, development and training within the context of a changing information landscape

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses selected literature, including governmental and professional body reports, focusing particularly on the implications of these for the contemporary and future education, training and development of the information profession. Key issues addressed are the impact of the government skills agenda and the increasing use of competency based frameworks.

Findings

Evidence suggests that the information profession is undergoing a period of profound change in relation to its qualifications base. The paper concludes that many of the previously enshrined shibboleths of professional education, training and development are undergoing a fundamental re‐examination. Barriers relating to qualification levels, to professional practice and to career development, are being circumvented or demolished. In a volatile climate of rapid change, continuing professional development (CPD) is necessary if professionals wish to keep abreast of new skills and knowledge.

Originality/value

The paper identifies and discusses the current drivers for change in relation to the skills, competencies, education, training, and development, for the information profession, including issues in relation to defining “professionalism”. As a contribution to contemporary debate on these issues, the paper should be of use to policy makers, practitioners, researchers and students.

Details

New Library World, vol. 110 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

1 – 9 of 9