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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Zuoming Liu and Vaidyanathan Jayaraman

This paper aims to investigate how the professional service outsourcing (PSO) firm’s external knowledge integration with global clients, internal integration across…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how the professional service outsourcing (PSO) firm’s external knowledge integration with global clients, internal integration across various functional units and the synergistic effects between them in improving PSO performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the theory of organizational learning, a conceptual framework is proposed with hypothesized relationships. The relationships in this conceptual model were tested using a structural equation model (SEM) to analyze a survey dataset including 192 Indian-based professional service providers.

Findings

A service provider’s performance is positively associated with its external integration with global clients and internal integration across various functional units. Synergistic effect is generated from balanced high-level external and internal integration in improving PSO performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the much-needed efforts in studying PSO, a new and fast-growing cross-border professional service activity, and provides helpful managerial implications to practicing global clients and offshore PSO service providers on how to successfully manage and govern the outsourcing process to achieve expected benefits.

Originality/value

This study focuses on offshore service provider’s viewpoint to extend traditional supply-chain integration regarding cooperative and mutually beneficial mechanisms to the context of PSO.

Details

Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5364

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2013

Hyung-Suk Choi, Stephen P. Ferris, Narayanan Jayaraman and Sanjiv Sabherwal

To determine what role overconfidence plays in the forced removal of CEOs internationally.

Abstract

Purpose

To determine what role overconfidence plays in the forced removal of CEOs internationally.

Design/Methodology

The study makes use of the Fortune Global 500 list.

Findings

We find that overconfident CEOs face significantly greater hazards of forced turnovers than their non-overconfident peers. Regardless of important differences in culture, law, and corporate governance across countries, overconfidence has a separate and distinct effect on CEO turnover. Overconfident CEOs appear to be at greater risk of dismissal regardless of where in the world they are located. We also discover that overconfident CEOs are disproportionately succeeded by other overconfident CEOs, regardless of whether they are forcibly removed or voluntarily leave office. Finally, we determine that the dismissal of overconfident CEOs is associated with improved market performance, but only limited enhancement in accounting returns.

Originality/Value

This study is unique with its examination of overconfidence among global CEOs rather than being limited to U.S. chief executives. It also provides insight into how overconfidence is related to national cultures, legal systems and corporate governance mechanisms.

Details

Advances in Financial Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-120-5

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2014

Rasha Ashraf and Narayanan Jayaraman

We investigate institutional investors’ trading behavior of acquiring firm stocks surrounding merger activities for the period 1992–2001. We label investment companies and…

Abstract

We investigate institutional investors’ trading behavior of acquiring firm stocks surrounding merger activities for the period 1992–2001. We label investment companies and independent investment advisors as active institutions and banks, nonbank trusts, and insurance companies as passive institutions. We analyze the trading behavior of active and passive institutions surrounding merger announcements and their eventual resolution. Our results indicate that active institutions significantly increase their holdings of acquiring firm stocks for mergers with higher announcement period abnormal return and this increase is more pronounced for stock mergers than cash mergers. Active institutions display preference for stock proposals at the merger announcement on the basis of their prior beliefs and this is explained by the “overreaction phenomenon.” However, they update their beliefs between announcement and final resolution as more information arrives into the market. Finally, active institutions appear to correct their overreaction behavior by displaying their greater preference for cash proposals as compared to stock proposals at the quarter of eventual outcome. The trading behavior of passive institutions suggests that these institutions disregard the market response of merger announcement in trading acquiring firm stocks at the announcement quarter. The passive institutions gradually update their beliefs and utilize the information released at the announcement in rebalancing their portfolios at the final resolution.

Details

Corporate Governance in the US and Global Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-292-0

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2014

Abstract

Details

Evaluating Companies for Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-622-4

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Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2003

Christopher W Anderson, Terry L Campbell, Narayanan Jayaraman and Gershon N Mandelker

An inverse relation between performance and managerial turnover at Japanese firms suggests that bank monitoring substitutes for other governance mechanisms (Kaplan, 1994;…

Abstract

An inverse relation between performance and managerial turnover at Japanese firms suggests that bank monitoring substitutes for other governance mechanisms (Kaplan, 1994; Kang & Shivdasani, 1995). Morck and Nakamura (1999), however, report that Japanese banks protect their self-interests as creditors rather than the interests of shareholders when appointing corporate directors. We re-examine data on top management changes at Japanese firms and find results consistent with this latter notion. Specifically, management turnover is conditionally related to a firm’s ability to meet its short-term obligations rather than profitability or stock returns. Bank monitoring is therefore not a substitute for mechanisms that directly serve shareholders’ interests.

Details

Advances in Financial Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-214-6

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Abstract

Details

Corporate Governance in the US and Global Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-292-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2013

Abstract

Details

Advances in Financial Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-120-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2003

Abstract

Details

Advances in Financial Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-214-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Akash Dania and Rahul Verma

Terrorism, an important component of Political risk as a possible determinant of ADRs (American Depository Receipts) returns have received little attention in academic…

Abstract

Terrorism, an important component of Political risk as a possible determinant of ADRs (American Depository Receipts) returns have received little attention in academic literature. To address this issue and examine whether political risk is a major determinant of ADR returns of emerging market countries, this paper empirically examines market valuation of Indian ADRs around acts of terrorism. Using a sample of 52 such events in the sample period Jan 2003‐Dec 2003 we empirically analyze returns of Indian ADRs. The results from our study indicate a marginally negative significant effect, failing to indicate that event of terrorist attacks severely affect the Indian ADRs listed on the US stock market. This may be explained by a combined effect of; (a) the optimism of US investors towards emerging markets, and (b) market participants becoming more resilient and making informed choices around the “general” events of terrorism.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2019

Meng-Meng Wang and Jian-Jun Wang

The purpose of this paper is to explore the underlying mechanisms through which integration capability and learning capability influence IT outsourcing performance from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the underlying mechanisms through which integration capability and learning capability influence IT outsourcing performance from vendor’s perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a moderated mediation model to explain the underlying influence processes of integration capability and learning capability on vendor’s performance. A sample of 237 vendor firms was obtained from China through two separated surveys. The hypotheses were tested with the partial least squares method and bias-corrected bootstrapping method.

Findings

The empirical results indicate that external integration capability (EIC) mediates the effect of internal integration capability (IIC) on vendor outsourcing performance, and the relationship between EIC and vendor performance is positively moderated by learning capability, while learning capability has a negative moderating effect on the link between IIC and vendor performance. Further, the conditional indirect effect is suggested. The indirect effect of IIC on vendor performance through EIC becomes non-significant when learning capability is low.

Originality/value

This study highlights the counterintuitive notion that learning capability may not always have uniformly positive effects and figure out the mechanism through which integration capability and learning capability can effectively improve IT outsourcing performance.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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