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Book part
Publication date: 16 June 2017

Paul Kelly, Marie Murphy and Nanette Mutrie

The purpose of this chapter is to review and synthesise the available evidence for the health benefits of walking. It follows a non-systematic evidence review and finds…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to review and synthesise the available evidence for the health benefits of walking. It follows a non-systematic evidence review and finds that the evidence base for the health benefits of walking is growing. Increasingly we are finding strong evidence for the beneficial effects of walking for both individuals and populations. More evidence is required on how to better understand the health outcomes associated with walking and how to promote long term increases in walking behaviour. Systematic reviews of specific health benefits remain rare. Walking should be promoted in all population groups regardless of age or sex. There are currently few existing integrative syntheses of the physical and mental health outcomes associated with walking and this chapter aims to help fill that gap.

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Kate Hunt, Graeme Ford and Nanette Mutrie

Recent evidence shows that any form of physical activity, not just aerobic activity to improve cardiovascular fitness, can have significant health benefits. However…

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Abstract

Recent evidence shows that any form of physical activity, not just aerobic activity to improve cardiovascular fitness, can have significant health benefits. However, physical inactivity is increasingly widespread. Recent health promotion has emphasised the value of integrating activity into daily life, yet popular attention continues to focus on sporting excellence and team sports. Data from people in early and late middle age in the West of Scotland demonstrate that sporting and team activities are rarely undertaken throughout adult life, especially amongst women and people from more disadvantaged circumstances. The activities that are most commonly taken up and sustained throughout later adult life are walking, swimming, social dancing, keep fit/aerobics and golf. There is a need for greater emphasis, by all those in physical activity promotion, on activities which are the most likely to be sustained into adulthood.

Details

Health Education, vol. 101 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Kenneth Fox

The case for physical activity has been established through its impact on reduction in the risk of physical ill‐health such as coronary heart disease. However, there is…

587

Abstract

The case for physical activity has been established through its impact on reduction in the risk of physical ill‐health such as coronary heart disease. However, there is increasing interest in its potential for a) treating and preventing mental illness and also b) the promotion of mental well‐being in the general public. The topic is now widely studied with over 30 published narrative or meta‐analytic reviews of research into the effect of exercise on constructs such as clinical or subclinical depression or anxiety, self‐esteem, affect and mood, resilience to stress, cognitive function or sleep. This paper provides a summary and appraisal of the evidence for the effect of exercise on mental health and addresses key issues that face the use of exercise as a medium for health promotion.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Book part
Publication date: 16 June 2017

Abstract

Details

Walking
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-628-0

Abstract

Details

Walking
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-628-0

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Book part
Publication date: 16 June 2017

Abstract

Details

Walking
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-628-0

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