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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Lars Leon and Nancy Kress

This paper is the result of a small cost study of resource sharing services in 23 North American libraries. Its aim is to discuss trends that have affected resource…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is the result of a small cost study of resource sharing services in 23 North American libraries. Its aim is to discuss trends that have affected resource sharing costs since the last comprehensive study.

Design/methodology/approach

Selected libraries were approached for this phase of study. A pilot phase helped to clarify the cost and service definitions and revise the database which served as the data collection instrument.

Findings

Immediate access to electronic items at point of use has resulted in user demand for faster turnaround for physical materials. This in turn has led to increased costs for ILL technology and shipping. Costs have decreased but continue to show a noticeable disparity between ILL borrowing and lending. The data also clearly support the perception that patron initiated Circ-to-Circ module requests have a lower per transaction cost than traditional ILL.

Originality/value

Libraries have been relying on cost data that is now almost ten years old. While this study is small, the data provide an updated benchmark to assist libraries in making effective decisions regarding resource sharing. The study illustrates a range of costs which reinforce the need for libraries to investigate their own average costs to optimize decision making.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

Nancy Kress, Darcy Del Bosque and Tom Ipri

The purpose of this paper is to understand why users at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) are unable to locate locally held items from the university libraries'…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand why users at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) are unable to locate locally held items from the university libraries' electronic and physical collections using the library web site and catalog.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of usability testing methods and quality control methods were used. Items for the study were selected from cancelled interlibrary loan requests. A cognitive walkthrough was performed for citations representative of the top categories of cancellation because the item is owned or available electronically. Quality control methods were used to determine likely user failure points to completing this path. Data from the cognitive walkthrough were compared with actual user behavior, as observed through usability testing.

Findings

Participants in the study failed to locate known items for multiple reasons, but from the usability testing and analysis three major areas emerged: finding the correct starting‐point for the search, information not indexed for a selected search, and clicking on the call number link. The complexity of library resources was the main contributor to these failures. Participants expected library searching to behave like their other search experiences.

Research limitations/implications

The failure points identified in the study are in some cases specific to features of the UNLV Libraries' integrated library system.

Originality/value

This paper could be useful to libraries examining the ease with which users can locate items using the library web site and catalog. The research team used a quality control method to analyze usability testing, which provides valuable quantitative data concerning the relationship between user and system failure.

Details

New Library World, vol. 112 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

Janice M. Bogstad

For many years, science fiction has been perceived as “rayguns and rocket ships” boys' literature. Any number of impressionistic and statistical studies have identified…

Abstract

For many years, science fiction has been perceived as “rayguns and rocket ships” boys' literature. Any number of impressionistic and statistical studies have identified the typical SF reader as male, between the ages of twelve and twenty and, in the case of adults, employed in some technical field. Yet I continually find myself having conversations with women, only to find that they, like myself, began reading science fiction between the ages of six and ten, have been reading it voraciously ever since, and were often frustrated at the absence of satisfying female characters and the presence of misogynistic elements in what they read. The stereotype of the male reader and the generally male SF environment mask both the increasing presence of women writers in the field of science fiction and the existence of a feminist dialog within some SF novels. This dialog had its beginnings in the mid‐sixties and is still going strong. It is the hope of the feminist SF community that this effacement can be counteracted.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Robert Wayne Ronhaar

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Katherine Kress, Nancy Ozawa and Gregory Schmid

New consumers have emerged in North America. These consumers have higher expectations and are more demanding than yesterday’s consumers. Businesses must meet these…

Abstract

New consumers have emerged in North America. These consumers have higher expectations and are more demanding than yesterday’s consumers. Businesses must meet these requirements if they are to hold a competitive place in today’s marketplace. The authors report on research that identifies the key characteristics of the new consumers and suggest worker attitudes and behaviors that must be employed to serve these changing demands. This article also includes a lengthy sidebar that examines the factors that drive consumer attitude change over time.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Communication as Gesture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-515-9

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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2015

Nancy Pierce Morabito and Sandra Schamroth Abrams

This chapter calls attention to how creating a digital story, which focused on teaching and learning spaces for writing, served as a mediational tool to support preservice…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter calls attention to how creating a digital story, which focused on teaching and learning spaces for writing, served as a mediational tool to support preservice teachers’ reflective practice and understanding of writing and the writing process.

Methodology/approach

Data from over 50 students were parsed using Kember, McKay, Sinclair and Wong’s (2008) approach to determine levels of reflection. From the students whose work fell into the reflection-to-critical reflection range, we selected three students from different disciplines and adopted a case study approach for analyzing and discussing their work. Students’ informal and formal reflections and learning artifacts, as well as researcher field notes, contributed to a rich understanding of each case.

Findings

Review of students’ digital stories and related artifacts (i.e., storyboards, scripts, and reflections), as well as other course-related work, revealed that digital storytelling facilitated students’ developing understanding in three dimensions: writing, pedagogy, and reflective practice.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that digital storytelling can engage students in multimodal iterative practices analogous to the writing process that cultivates reflective thinking. Activities that scaffold such iteration and cross-literate practices can foster reflective thinking about inspired pedagogy within and beyond the classroom.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Elizabeth Choinski and Nancy Fuller

The use of herbal medicines for various ailments has become commonplace. The Internet provides a valuable reference tool for finding information about herbal medicines…

Abstract

The use of herbal medicines for various ailments has become commonplace. The Internet provides a valuable reference tool for finding information about herbal medicines, the herbal products industry, and research efforts in identifying useful natural products. However, sites that sell herbal products far outnumber sites that are strictly informational. This bibliography is a guide to noncommercial sites on the Internet that provide useful information.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1953

C.J. Anson

THE ideal to which all payment for work is striving is to reward “a fair day's work” by “a fair day's pay”. The two most usual methods of payment used in the attempt to…

Abstract

THE ideal to which all payment for work is striving is to reward “a fair day's work” by “a fair day's pay”. The two most usual methods of payment used in the attempt to achieve this ideal are:

Details

Work Study, vol. 2 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2017

Abstract

Details

Ethics, Equity, and Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-153-7

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