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1 – 10 of 337
Article
Publication date: 4 April 2024

Katharina Oktabec and Nadine Wills

Sustainability has become an integral part of the real estate industry, alongside advancing globalization and demographic development. Due to real estate's influence on greenhouse…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability has become an integral part of the real estate industry, alongside advancing globalization and demographic development. Due to real estate's influence on greenhouse gas emissions throughout its life cycle, both the regulatory and legal requirements concerning the sustainability of real estate are growing and, as a result of social responsibility, the interest of tenants and investors in sustainable real estate. However, criteria for measuring the ecological sustainability of a real estate investment in the purchase process in order to reduce the risk of including “stranded assets” in the portfolio are missing. This paper aims to address the need to integrate the issue of carbon stranding into existing sustainability rating tools.

Design/methodology/approach

Existing tools are examined based on defined criteria to determine whether they are suitable for purchasing a property before suitable tools for purchase are compared. Strengths and weaknesses are identified, which are to be remedied with the scoring tool. Taxonomy regulation is integrated into the existing valuation basis as a legal regulation.

Findings

The result is a scoring tool that enables real estate companies to measure and evaluate the ecological sustainability performance of a property during the acquisition process, taking into account the three aspects of sustainability and considering them when determining an appropriate purchase price in line with market conditions. Moreover, the developed tool helps to minimize the risk of acquiring a stranding asset.

Research limitations/implications

The environmental, social and governance (ESG) framework employed in this study does not incorporate governance considerations. While the analysis extensively evaluates the building's environmental and social aspects, it does not extend to examining the governance practices of the companies involved. Thus, the assessment is confined solely to the physical attributes of the property without accounting for broader corporate governance factors.

Practical implications

The developed scoring tool represents a valuable tool for the real estate industry, offering insights into sustainability performance during property acquisitions and providing a structured framework for decision-making. By addressing both certification and taxonomy regulation requirements, the tool contributes to the industry's evolution toward more sustainable and environmentally responsible real estate practices.

Originality/value

In response to the growing importance of sustainability in the real estate industry, this paper introduces a novel scoring tool for evaluating the sustainability of real estate investments during the acquisition process.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Jo Mullen and Jerome Carson

The purpose of this paper is to provide a profile of Jo Mullen.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a profile of Jo Mullen.

Design/methodology/approach

Jo provides a short background to her life and is then interviewed by Jerome.

Findings

Jo tells us about the teaching resources that she has developed to increase understanding of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD).

Research limitations/implications

While this is a single case study, it contains numerous helpful insights of how Jo has developed and presented her work, along with two mental health nurses, and of the high quality educational interventions she has produced.

Practical implications

Jo presents a model of co-production, where service partner and mental health professional are equals.

Social implications

It would be helpful if mental health services invested in supporting talented individuals like Jo, to develop and disseminate the tools she has created.

Originality/value

Thus far Jo has written her own personal account of what it is like to cope with BPD, a bigger training resource, “Wot R U Like?” and a board game, Personapoly, to help individuals solve social and personal problems.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2023

Dewi Tojib, Rahul Sujan, Junzhao Ma and Yelena Tsarenko

Service robots are gradually becoming more anthropomorphic and intelligent. This research aims to investigate how anthropomorphic service robots with different levels of…

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Abstract

Purpose

Service robots are gradually becoming more anthropomorphic and intelligent. This research aims to investigate how anthropomorphic service robots with different levels of intelligence affect their human counterparts.

Design/methodology/approach

Two between-subject experimental studies were used to test whether different levels of service robot anthropomorphism with different levels of intelligence influence employees' morale and resistance to service robots.

Findings

Study 1 shows that the effect of service robot anthropomorphism (low vs. high) on employees' resistance and morale is mediated by perceived job-security threat. Study 2 validates this mediating effect and shows that it is moderated by the type of AI (mechanical vs. analytical). Specifically, when exposed to mechanical AI-powered service robots, employees exhibit a higher perceived job-security threat toward robots with a high (vs. low) degree of anthropomorphism. This moderating effect is not observed when employees are exposed to analytical AI-powered service robots. This moderated mediation effect is also found for the signing of a petition as the behavioral outcome.

Practical implications

Service firms considering the adoption of mechanical AI-powered service robots should choose a low (vs. high) anthropomorphic robot to reduce the sense of job-security threat felt by human employees, which subsequently increases their acceptance. However, if analytical AI-powered service robots with are to replace their human employees, the degree of anthropomorphism becomes irrelevant.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study to explore how anthropomorphic service robots can influence human employees' evaluations and behaviors.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2023

Mariam Hassoun

Six million Iraqis were displaced during the Iraq-Daesh War, and although many have returned to their communities, there remain approximately 1.3 million internally displaced…

Abstract

Six million Iraqis were displaced during the Iraq-Daesh War, and although many have returned to their communities, there remain approximately 1.3 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) across the country. Today, approximately 25% of IDP children in Iraq are out of school (REACH, 2020). This study foregrounds the voices and family histories of IDPs when navigating educational access and makes a methodological argument for the need for increased qualitative research in post-conflict settings. Using the conceptual framework of navigation, the author presents displaced persons as agentic, dynamic people with lived histories, present realities, and imagined futures which inform their journey through the education system. Semi-structured interviews with 16 IDPs who identified as parents or caregivers were conducted virtually. Displaced Iraqis value education for different reasons, ranging from basic literacy to employment to societal improvement. In doing so, the author challenges the barrier-dominant framework through which IDP educational access is often understood and nuanced with a temporal lens which requires us to identify IDPs as (1) persons capable of making choices for themselves, (2) givers as well as receivers, and (3) persons who aspire to goals beyond basic survival.

Details

Education for Refugees and Forced (Im)Migrants Across Time and Context
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-421-0

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 19 July 2017

The jailing of Humala brings to five the number of former presidents facing legal problems in relation to either corruption, human rights violations, or both. Humala's lawyers will

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB222190

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1962

WORK STUDY still suffers from the unenviable reputation it gained in its early days when it was regarded as little more than a device, tinged with a touch of duress, for getting a…

Abstract

WORK STUDY still suffers from the unenviable reputation it gained in its early days when it was regarded as little more than a device, tinged with a touch of duress, for getting a greater output from the manual worker on the shop floor. This legacy of dislike still erupts occasionally in unexpected ways.

Details

Work Study, vol. 11 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2017

Khalid Arar

The purpose of this paper is to focus on gender and social justice (SJ) among pioneer female principals and superintendents in the Arab education system in Israel. The research…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on gender and social justice (SJ) among pioneer female principals and superintendents in the Arab education system in Israel. The research questions were: what motivated these women to act for SJ? Are there common personal characteristics and educational values which characterize these women? What actions have they taken to apply SJ through their work?

Design/methodology/approach

Four superintendents and two principals participated in in-depth interviews, describing their careers in education and their contributions.

Findings

The findings indicate that these women were highly motivated often by their backgrounds to right social wrongs upholding values of equality and justice and empowering others to succeed. They employed leadership skills that initiate a strong desire to succeed and challenged inegalitarian rules and norms. They brought their unique feminine strengths and experience to promote social goals far beyond requirements of their official job descriptions. Hopefully their views and actions can guide the Arab education system to pedagogy that rectifies social injustice includes students and empowers teachers.

Originality/value

It is concluded that through their jobs these women leaders were able to initiate a policy of change and promote a new educational agenda.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 56 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2024

Jo Mullen

The purpose of this paper is to provide an example of patient-led co-production.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an example of patient-led co-production.

Design/methodology/approach

The New Economics Foundation’s six principles of co-production (nef, 2013) have been used to frame the activities undertaken during the author’s relationship with a community mental health nurse.

Findings

This paper describes a co-produced project between a patient and a community mental health nurse to create a range of resources and to deliver training, resulting in mutual benefit for both parties.

Practical implications

This paper invites policy makers to consider the unique role that community mental health nurses can play in supporting patients with long-term challenges that have developed because of an imbalance and an abuse of power within earlier relationships; by adopting a co-production approach, centred on the patient’s interests and skills, a working partnership can be achieved wherein both parties feel that they matter.

Originality/value

Co-production is usually used with groups of stakeholders working together in an equitable way to design or deliver a new service; this paper, however, seeks to demonstrate how the process can be effectively used when the project is patient-led within the context of a therapeutic relationship.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 September 2017

Danielle Docka-Filipek

The following ethnographic study was conducted to better understand the site-specific, qualitative impact of organizational, taken-for-granted assumptions and practices regarding…

Abstract

Purpose

The following ethnographic study was conducted to better understand the site-specific, qualitative impact of organizational, taken-for-granted assumptions and practices regarding gender and family life in the reproduction of on-the-ground gender inequality. More specifically, this case study considers the consequences of organizational assumptions consistent with Bem’s (1993) three “lenses of gender” – androcentrism, essentialism, and polarization – on direct service provision for homeless clients in a small, faith-based, social service provider.

Methodology/approach

Interview and participant-observation data were gathered during time spent volunteering with Integrity Intervention (pseudonym): a small liberal Methodist outreach ministry for the homeless. Data collection was guided by the following question: How do Integrity Intervention’s cultural models (or “schemas”) for gender and family life shape the ways the organization becomes a gendered social space?

Findings

I find that expectations for client behavior were deeply gendered, in a manner consistent with the “lenses of gender.” Additionally, normative expectations for subordinate masculinities were also informed and crosscut by race and class marginalization. Ultimately, my findings suggest that the “lenses of gender” may be imbued with class and race-specific interpretive meaning. I delineate forms of site-specific gendered, racialized, and classed cultural schemata for understanding poverty and homelessness, and explain how they ultimately work together to preclude inclusive and gender-equitable service provision.

Limitations

This study is limited to providers and participants in one particular nonprofit organization.

Originality/value

The conclusions of the study bear implications for understanding the various forms through which gender inequality is reproduced – particularly in settings of faith-based social service provision.

Details

Discourses on Gender and Sexual Inequality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-197-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Tensie Steijvers, Nadine Lybaert and Julie Dekker

The importance of formal human resource (HR) practices is widely recognized in management literature, but under-researched in the small business and family firm domain. Previous…

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Abstract

Purpose

The importance of formal human resource (HR) practices is widely recognized in management literature, but under-researched in the small business and family firm domain. Previous research indicates that family firms rely more on informal HR practices, based on social networks. However, given the heterogeneity of family firms, one cannot assume that all family firms are reluctant to formalize their HR. As the CEO is the key decision maker who covers HR management in family firms, the effect of the CEO type on formal HR practices will be studied. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a large-scale survey, resulting in a response of 532 family SMEs, the authors perform a hierarchical regression analysis studying the effect of a family/nonfamily CEO on the use of formal HR practices, introducing several moderating effects: CEO generational stage, tenure and education.

Findings

Results indicate that family firms with a family CEO have more formal HR practices than those managed by a nonfamily CEO due to higher levels of goal alignment and intentional trust between the owning family and family CEO. Moreover, family firms managed by first generation family CEOs and family CEOs with a higher education have more formal HR practices.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that family CEOs can be equally or even more able as nonfamily CEOs to run a family firm in a formalized/professionalized manner.

Originality/value

Given the scant amount of research on HR formalization in family firms, even though literature documents performance increasing effects, this study fulfils the need to study the effect of the CEO on HR formalization.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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