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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2020

Sadi Boğaç Kanadlı, Pingying Zhang and Nada K. Kakabadse

Board diversity has been a hotly debated topic in the field of corporate governance. The paper examines the role of board chairperson and its moderating effect on the…

Abstract

Purpose

Board diversity has been a hotly debated topic in the field of corporate governance. The paper examines the role of board chairperson and its moderating effect on the relationship between job-related diversity and boards’ strategic tasks performance. The purpose of this paper is to add on our body of knowledge about the impact of job-related diversity on boards’ strategic tasks performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies the structural equation modeling (SEM) technique to examine survey responses from chief executive officers (CEOs). Both the measurement model and structural model have obtained good results, supporting the appropriateness of using the SEM approach.

Findings

The findings suggest that there is a positive association between job-related diversity and boards’ strategic tasks performance, which is moderated by a chairperson’s leadership efficacy and the option of a former-CEO as board chair.

Practical implications

To achieve the intended effect of job-related diversity in boards, policymakers need to be mindful about the importance of the board chairperson. Board chairperson’s characteristics such as leadership efficacy and a former-CEO experience would amplify the positive effect of diversity.

Originality/value

This research paper contributes to the literature on board diversity, board leadership and strategic management of firms. Findings validated researchers’ concern about the negligence of examining moderating factors in board diversity research. Moreover, results echo the concern that board leadership research should shift the attention from structural aspects to the behavioral issues. Finally, this study is the first to show the positive influence of a board chairperson in disseminating benefits of a diverse board.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Nada K. Kakabadse and Andrew Kakabadse

Although the current wave of globalization is the result of unprecedented scientific and technological advances, through history, movements of an international nature have…

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2643

Abstract

Although the current wave of globalization is the result of unprecedented scientific and technological advances, through history, movements of an international nature have been, to a large extent, about the spread of political and economic ideas across borders. “Geopolitical realism is based on the interests of the state”. Scientific and technological advances, together with the opening of markets to the free passage of goods, services and finance, has led to a huge growth in world trade. However, such positive developments have also their downside. The findings of the United Nations Human Development Programme Report highlight that global inequalities in income and living standards have reached grotesque proportions. Further, such disparities are linked to ever‐intensified environmental degradation and the extinction of some 11,046 species. Such circumstances have witnessed the growth of community‐based local currencies, the emergence of a social movement advocating corporate social reasonability (CSR) and a growing literature critical of the Anglo‐American corporate governance model, where shareholder wealth maximization is the driving force. Yet, the philosophy and practice of shareholder wealth maximization persists. This paper explores the effects of free‐market economics, globalization and western capitalist practices in terms of their consequences for the planet, people, profit and posterity (the four Ps). A case is made outlining the need for an advanced corporate governance model that integrates the four Ps. In so doing, the paper seeks inspiration from the ancient philosophy of Buddhism and, in conclusion, examines the role of the Business School in developing future, reflexive practitioners, equipped to effectively provide the necessary balance between shareholder expectations and stakeholder needs within a new paradigm of a balanced society.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Nada Korac‐Kakabadse, Alexander Kouzmin, Andrew Korac‐Kakabadse and Lawson Savery

States that the major reasons for difficulties in cross‐cultural communication stem from the fact that actors from different cultures have different understandings…

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16409

Abstract

States that the major reasons for difficulties in cross‐cultural communication stem from the fact that actors from different cultures have different understandings regarding the interaction process and different styles of dialogue. Suggests that better understanding of communication within other cultures is the key to success. Uses past literature to suggest a number of cultural variability constructs concerning preferred interaction behaviours and the common themes they share. Presents three case studies to illustrate this.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Nada K. Kakabadse, Andrew Kakabadse and Linda Lee‐Davies

This paper examines existing concepts of the leadership development of high potential managers and aims to take a step further toward them understanding their leadership…

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1870

Abstract

This paper examines existing concepts of the leadership development of high potential managers and aims to take a step further toward them understanding their leadership development within the context of the working environment and gain a more developed self‐awareness. Once armed with this greater sensitivity, the way they choose to use it is surprising. Specifically, several waves of carefully screened participants holding a full leadership portfolio and attending a specific and focused program – the Integrated Leadership Development Program (ILDP) – are studied. After leadership training, field experience and reflective journal keeping, the participants produced a wide range of qualitative feedback to be set alongside that of their peers and subordinates. The experiences of the 216 study participants and the leadership traits they revealed are reined in on the Leadership Discretion model to assess the similarities and differences between four defined categories of leader. The majority of participants reported benefit from an increased self‐awareness, particularly in terms of being more conscious of and thoughtful regarding their impact on others. A minority sported the tendency to covet and collect more control.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Andrew Kakabadse, Nadeem Khan and Nada K. Kakabadse

This paper aims to present the outcomes from 40 one-to-one semi-structured interviews and 12 focus group sessions with company secretaries, chairmen, CEOs, chief financial…

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1815

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the outcomes from 40 one-to-one semi-structured interviews and 12 focus group sessions with company secretaries, chairmen, CEOs, chief financial officer (CFOs), senior independent director (SIDs) and NEDs, about the role of the company secretary.

Design/methodology/approach

Lukes’ (1974, 2005) third dimension of power is engaged in thematic analysis of this strategic leadership role and its contribution to Board effectiveness.

Findings

The findings identify “discretionary capacity” as being critical to effective role contribution.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst the inquiry included international participants, e.g. multi-national Board members and company secretaries, it was conducted within the UK.

Practical implications

Having a range of discretion is particularly necessary at this time, when the new governance regime is broadening its demands on the role of the company secretary to interact with wider stakeholders.

Social implications

Better Board effectiveness is critical to broader sustainability of business in society.

Originality/value

An emergent model of the company secretary role is offered as a tool for building discretionary capacity, based on key technical, commercial and social characteristics, in their contexts – understood together as “Breadth” and “Majesty”. Breadth establishes a competency, whereas majesty, the refined high-level social qualities. This study concludes that the company secretary role is highly dependent on the preferences of the chairman, in enabling them to make an effective contribution to the Board.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Linda Lee‐Davies, Nada K. Kakabadse and Andrew Kakabadse

To examine the leadership requirements and challenges that need to be considered for future organizational sustainability.

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1913

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the leadership requirements and challenges that need to be considered for future organizational sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach adopted focuses on the pool of talent available and required within the organization and how a philosophy of shared responsibility and commitment can be engendered on behalf of the organization.

Findings

A model is provided outlining how multiple conversations, namely a practice of polylogue, can be effectively pursued.

Practical implications

The benefits of polylogue are outlined in terms of future leader development and staff retention through accommodating a co‐operative working environment.

Originality/value

Pursuing multiple “fierce conversations”; through polylogue, but in a constructive manner, is positioned to effectively realize competitive advantage.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2021

Nikolai Mouraviev and Nada K. Kakabadse

Israel is characterised by economic growth that is accompanied not only by prosperity but also by increasing poverty. This paper aims to conceptualise the role of Israel’s…

Abstract

Purpose

Israel is characterised by economic growth that is accompanied not only by prosperity but also by increasing poverty. This paper aims to conceptualise the role of Israel’s social enterprises in reducing the gap between prosperous and disadvantaged populations.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study is based on 23 in-depth interviews. It makes use of a theoretical framework that incorporates two elements: cosmopolitanism and social entrepreneurship. Cosmopolitanism, together with government policies that aim to develop free enterprise and international trade, support entrepreneurship and advance education, accompanies and facilitates prosperity. Whilst prosperity increases inequality, social entrepreneurship develops as a tool to mitigate the side effects of economic growth in the form of the increasing gap between the rich and the poor.

Findings

This paper argues that the principal reason why the gap evolved and is increasing is in the discrepancy between rapidly rising requirements presented by the innovation-focussed economy and the workers’ skills. Based on interviews with social entrepreneurs who are (co)founders or managers of businesses with a social purpose, findings show that the gap between prosperity and social deprivation could be bridged by increasing workers’ capacity to align their skills with employers’ requirements, which is the area to which Israeli social enterprises contribute.

Originality/value

The paper argues that cosmopolitan orientation is one of the contributors to economic growth and innovation, whilst prosperity increases the gap between high- and low-income groups. The paper contributes to the body of knowledge about social entrepreneurs by applying the framework that makes use of cosmopolitanism as an important driver of Israeli social entrepreneurship, which helps to explain the role that social business enterprises play in reducing the gap between prosperous and disadvantaged populations.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Nikolai Mouraviev and Nada K. Kakabadse

The purpose of this paper is to survey various meanings attached to a public–private partnership (PPP) and related aspects in Western literature and to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to survey various meanings attached to a public–private partnership (PPP) and related aspects in Western literature and to identify commonalities and differences between them. Additionally, the article intends to critically assess conflicting and overlapping views on contractual and institutional PPPs, their forms and models and to draw insights for transitional economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The article contrasts and compares views on PPP meanings, forms and models within Western PPP literature and also draws comparisons with understanding of partnership aspects in the Russian language sources. The paper examines theories underpinning PPPs, builds connections to PPP advantages and drawbacks and provides critical assessment of net benefits that PPPs may bring along to the society.

Findings

The article concludes that future PPP research in transitional countries such as Kazakhstan and Russia, particularly in the area of organisational and power arrangements in partnerships, may delineate new concepts such as government as a guarantor of a PPP project, social significance of a PPP project and risk management in a country’s contextual environment.

Originality/value

Research in the field of PPPs in transitional countries such as Russia and Kazakhstan is in its infancy. The paper intends to contribute to the body of knowledge about PPPs by providing detailed account and categorisation of their principal meanings, forms, models and underpinning theories and by drawing insights for future research in transitional countries.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Katerina Nicolopoulou, Nada K. Kakabadse, Kanellos Panagiotis Nikolopoulos, Jose M. Alcaraz and Konstantina Sakellariou

The paper aims to focus on the role that cosmopolitanism and, in particular, “the cosmopolitan disposition” (Woodward et al., 2008) plays in the process of entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to focus on the role that cosmopolitanism and, in particular, “the cosmopolitan disposition” (Woodward et al., 2008) plays in the process of entrepreneurial business by transnational business elites in Dubai.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a relational perspective based on Bourdieu and Wacquant’s (1992) Reflexive Sociology, as well as an inductive design, the authors conducted 30 semi-structured interviews focusing on both expatriates and Emiratis (locals/nationals) who displayed key features of a transnational business elite.

Findings

The findings indicate that the cosmopolitan disposition is an asset for transnational business elites when they venture in the context of Dubai.

Research limitations/implications

The findings would have to be further replicated in similar contexts, i.e. other major cities displaying similar cosmopolitan features with Dubai. A theoretical framework that calls for further study of transnational entrepreneurship via the lens of cosmopolitan disposition and Bourdieuan “habitus” is proposed.

Practical implications

The research outlines cosmopolitan skills for a transnational business elite which are required when entrepreneurial ventures are developed in the context of a city like Dubai.

Social implications

Cosmopolitanism and transnational entrepreneurship change cities like Dubai around the world constantly. Therefore, this study aims at achieving a better understanding of these changes and the ways in which they occur.

Originality/value

Studies on transnational entrepreneurship have already adopted Bourdieu’s theory (1977/1986), but this is the first time the cosmopolitan perspective and disposition is researched using this approach.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Nada K. Kakabadse, Eddy Louchart and Andrew Kakabadse

Many criticisms questioning the role and the efficiency of business consultants have been addressed. However, although a great deal of research has been carried out on…

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9198

Abstract

Purpose

Many criticisms questioning the role and the efficiency of business consultants have been addressed. However, although a great deal of research has been carried out on business consultancy, little has been written on business consultancy from the consultant's viewpoint. In order to gain a detailed view of the situation from an internal consultant's perspective, an investigation of how business consultants perceive their role and contribution within their clients' organisations was undertaken. Drawing on different perspectives, this study aims to demystify the role of business consultants, and to ascertain how they perceive their role within their clients' organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

A series of interviews were conducted, where business consultants were asked to comment on issues related to the nature of the relationship with their clients, the pros and cons of their role and also the amount of control and discretion they exercise over the different projects in which they are engaged. Interview data from 17 business consultants from a variety of fields, such as change management, information technology, corporate finance and human resource, are analysed using an interpretive frame.

Findings

The research findings reveal that differences exist between the rather pejorative conclusions of previous research and the conclusions of this study. Whereas previous research highlighted the omnipotence and the more or less deontological practice of consultants, the data analysis from this study concludes that business consultants appear very humble in their approach to their relationship with clients, and believe that moving clients forward is their ultimate goal. The findings also enable the study to demonstrate that business consultants are conscious of the amount of control and discretion that is passed on to them by clients, and do recognise that criticisms of their role can be at times justified.

Originality/value

The study has value for both consultants and clients. The role determinants model presented in the study highlights the main characteristics of the role of business consultants and helps both clients and consultants to rethink their approach to the consulting process.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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