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Article
Publication date: 22 January 2021

Mahour Mellat Parast and Nachiappan Subramanian

This paper aims to examine the relationship of supply chain disruption risk drivers to supply chain performance and firm performance outcomes.

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1025

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship of supply chain disruption risk drivers to supply chain performance and firm performance outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Four disruption risk drivers for a supply chain are identified, namely, demand disruption risk, supply disruption risk, process disruption risk and environment disruption risk. A cross-sectional survey was developed and data was collected from 315 Chinese firms to determine the relationship of supply chain disruption risks to supply chain performance and firm performance.

Findings

The empirical findings show that supply disruption risks and process disruption risks have a significant impact on supply chain performance. In addition, this paper shows that supply disruptions, demand disruptions and process disruptions are significantly related to firm performance. This paper shows that supply chain disruption risks have different effects on supply chain performance and firm performance. Managers should be aware that disruption risk drivers can have an impact on firm performance that is different from their impact on supply chain performance. An important finding of the study is that the magnitude of the impact of disruption risks on supply chain performance is greater on the upstream side of the supply chain than on the downstream side of the supply chain.

Originality/value

This is one of the early studies to examine the effect of supply chain disruption risk drivers on both firm performance and supply chain performance. An important finding of the study is that the magnitude of the impact of disruption risks on supply chain performance is greater on the upstream side of the supply chain than on the downstream side of the supply chain.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Usha Ramanathan, Nachiappan Subramanian and Guy Parrott

The technology evolution compels retail networks to introduce unique business models to retain customers and to gain a competitive advantage. Customer reviews available…

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20829

Abstract

Purpose

The technology evolution compels retail networks to introduce unique business models to retain customers and to gain a competitive advantage. Customer reviews available through social media need to be taken into account by retail networks to design a model with unique service operations and marketing approaches that will improve loyalty by adding value to customers. Furthermore, the relationship between customer satisfaction and customer spending behaviour is very weak and needs further investigation. Hence the purpose of this paper is to understand how retail network leverage the potential of social media reviews along with unique service operations to satisfy customers. The study analyses the nexus of: a brand, promotional offers, service operations; and their interaction through social media reviews on customer satisfaction levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a conceptual model for the social media era. The authors combine the idea of loyalty- and value-based models of Chatterjee (2013). The authors employed a survey questionnaire method to elicit opinions of retail customer satisfaction based on social media reviews, service operations and marketing efforts. The authors derive measures of the model from existing literature and expert opinion.

Findings

Social media reviews dramatically impact upon customer satisfaction. Similarly the empirical analysis identifies the significant and positive role played by service operations in customer satisfaction levels. Interestingly the authors did not find unequivocal support for brand satisfaction impacting on customer satisfaction. However, when promotions interact well with service operations, the level of customer satisfaction is significantly affected. Similarly the authors did not observe a positive outcome when there is an interaction between promotion and social media reviews. After reading the reviews, some potential buyers make a visit to store before making final decisions and surprisingly, promotional effects do not change their mind set.

Practical implications

Research findings confirm the importance of social media reviews, marketing and interaction between promotion and service operations enabling retail networks to build loyalty and value-based models. Based on customer behaviour, the study suggests a need to consider operational efficiencies when promoting sales; through careful planning, customer satisfaction and profitability levels can be increased. This sends a strong message to the retail network to defend their position within a very competitive business market.

Originality/value

The empirical evidence based on customer experience would be helpful for companies in integrating their operations and marketing efforts enabling them to convert different segment of customers such as “free riders (higher satisfaction and low profitability)” and “vulnerable customers (low satisfaction and higher profitability)” into “star customers (higher satisfaction and high profitability)”. Through a considered approach: combining social media reviews, marketing and operations, businesses will be better-placed to survive in the ultra-competitive social media-influenced era.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Ruchi Mishra, Rajesh Kumar Singh and Nachiappan Subramanian

The present study aims to assess the role of supply chain resilience as an operational excellence approach to deal with disruptions caused by coronavirus pandemic in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to assess the role of supply chain resilience as an operational excellence approach to deal with disruptions caused by coronavirus pandemic in the food supply chain of an agri-food supply firm.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study method was used to analyse the disruptions faced by the agricultural food supply chain during the pandemic. The study applies a dynamic capability theory as a foundation to develop a contextualised resilience framework for agri-food supply chain to achieve operational excellence. The case has been analysed by using situation-actor-process (SAP) and learning-action-performance (LAP) framework.

Findings

The SAP aspect of framework points that the flexibility amongst actors for a resilient agriculture supply chain worsened due to the lockdown measures post COVID-19. The LAP aspect of framework suggests how resilience can be built at the supply, demand and logistics end through various proactive and reactive practices such as collaboration, coordination, ICT and ground-level inputs. Lack of commitment and inadequate support from top management towards supply chain resilience are also observed as significant challenges to maintain operational excellence during the pandemic.

Research limitations/implications

One of the major implications of the study is that a mix of capabilities rather than a single capability can be the most appropriate way for making the supply chain resilient to maintain operational excellence during the pandemic. However, the sources of disruptions need to be duly recognised to derive the best-contextualised resilience framework for agri-food supply chains.

Originality/value

The development of a contextualised research framework as well as research propositions for analysing supply chain resilience are the major contribution of this study.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Nachiappan Subramanian and Muhammad Abdulrahman

Carbon Efficient Practices (CEPs) are gaining momentum due to the serious consequences of climate change. While past studies have focused on the effects of either drivers…

Abstract

Purpose

Carbon Efficient Practices (CEPs) are gaining momentum due to the serious consequences of climate change. While past studies have focused on the effects of either drivers or barriers to green practices especially in the context of developed countries, relatively little attention has been devoted to the simultaneous effects of drivers and barriers on product redesign, particularly in the context of China. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a blend of the Contextual Interaction Theory and Newton’s second law of motion, this paper proposes a conceptual model that simultaneously examines the impact of CEP drivers and barriers on product redesign and performance.

Findings

Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) analysis on a sample of 239 Chinese manufacturing firms indicated that drivers had substantially higher effects on product redesign and performance compared to the influence of other barriers.

Originality/value

Use of Newton’s second law of motion as a theoretical framework for understanding the adoption of CEPs in the context of China is novel. Implications of this pattern of results on academic theory building and practice are offered.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2020

Dirk C. Moosmayer, Muhammad Dan-Asabe Abdulrahman, Nachiappan Subramanian and Lars Bergkvist

Remanufacturing is the only end-of-life (EOL) treatment process that results in as-new functional and aesthetic quality and warranty. However, applying mental model…

Abstract

Purpose

Remanufacturing is the only end-of-life (EOL) treatment process that results in as-new functional and aesthetic quality and warranty. However, applying mental model theory, the purpose of this paper is to argue that the conception of remanufacturing as an EOL process activates an operational mental model (OMM) that connects to resource reuse, environmental concern and cost savings and is thus opposed to a strategic mental model (SMM) that associates remanufacturing with quality improvements and potential price increases.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors support the argument by empirically assessing consumers’ multi-attribute decision process for cars with remanufactured or new engines among 202 car buyers in China. The authors conduct a conjoint analysis and use the results as input to simulate market shares for various markets on which these cars compete.

Findings

The results suggest that consumers on average attribute reduced utility to remanufactured engines, thus in line with the OMM. However, the authors identify a segment accounting for about 30 per cent of the market with preference for remanufactured engines. The fact that this segment has reduced environmental concern supports the SMM idea that remanufactured products can be bought for their quality.

Research limitations/implications

A single-country (China) single-brand (Volkswagen) study is used to support the conceptualised mental models. While this strengthens the internal validity of the results, future research could improve the external validity by using more representative sampling in a wider array of empirical contexts. Moreover, future work could test the theory more explicitly.

Practical implications

By selling cars with remanufactured engines to customers with a SMM that values the at least equal performance of remanufactured products, firms can enhance their profit from remanufactured products. In addition, promoting SMM enables sustainable business models for the sharing economy.

Originality/value

As a community, the authors need to more effectively reflect on shaping mental models that disconnect remanufacturing from analogies that convey inferior quality and performance associations. Firms can overcome reduced utility perceptions not only by providing discounts, i.e. sharing the economic benefits of remanufacturing, but even more by increasing the warranty, thus sharing remanufacturing’s performance benefit and reducing consumers’ risk, a mechanism widely acknowledged in product diffusion but neglected in remanufacturing so far.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2021

Byung-Gak Son, Hyojin Kim, Daesik Hur and Nachiappan Subramanian

In this paper, the authors seek to contribute to the supply chain digitalisation literature by investigating a potential dark side of supply chain digitalisation from the…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors seek to contribute to the supply chain digitalisation literature by investigating a potential dark side of supply chain digitalisation from the viewpoint of the small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) suppliers, namely digital capability asymmetry and the partner opportunism of more digitally capable large buyers against SME suppliers. The authors seek to contribute further to the governance literature by investigating the effectiveness of the governance mechanism (legal contracts and relational contracts) in suppressing partner opportunism of this nature.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data collected from 125 Korean SMEs, the authors employed a hierarchical regression method to test a set of hypotheses focussing on the dark side of supply chain digitalisation and the effectiveness of the governance mechanism.

Findings

The study’s findings suggest that supplier-perceived digital capability asymmetry, wherein a buyer has a superior digital capability than its SME supplier, increases the SME supplier's dependence on the more digitally capable buyer, with the result that it is more exposed to buyer opportunism. Moreover, the results suggest that only relational governance is effective in protecting SME suppliers from buyer opportunism of this nature.

Originality/value

So far, the overwhelming majority of supply chain digitalisation research has debated its “bright side”. On the contrary, from the resource dependence theory perspective, this paper explains its dark side by providing empirical evidence on (1) the links between supplier-perceived digital capability asymmetry and a buyer's opportunism through an increased supplier's dependence and (2) the effectiveness of different types of governance in opportunism suppression.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 21 July 2020

Saileshsingh Gunessee and Nachiappan Subramanian

The first purpose of this paper is to situate and conceptualise ambiguity in the operations management (OM) literature, as connected to supply chain decision-making…

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1797

Abstract

Purpose

The first purpose of this paper is to situate and conceptualise ambiguity in the operations management (OM) literature, as connected to supply chain decision-making (SCDM). The second purpose is to study the role of ambiguity-coping mechanisms in that context.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses the behavioural decision theory (BDT) to better embed ambiguity in a generic SCDM framework. The framework explicates both behavioural and non-behavioural antecedents of ambiguity and enables us to also ground the “coping” mechanisms as individual and organisational level strategies. Properties of the framework are illustrated through two “ambiguous” events – the 2011 Thai flood and Covid-19 pandemic.

Findings

Three key findings are documented. First, ambiguity is shown to distinctively affect supply chain decisions and having correspondence with specific coping mechanisms. Second, the conceptual framework shows how individual coping mechanisms can undermine rational-based organisational coping mechanisms, leading to “sub-optimal” (poor) supply chain decisions. Third, this study highlights the positive role of visibility but surprisingly organisational “experiential” learning is imperfect, due to the focus on “similar” past experience and what is known.

Originality/value

The paper is novel in two ways. First, it introduces ambiguity – an often neglected concept in operations management – into the supply chain lexicon, by developing a typology of ambiguity. Second, ambiguity-coping mechanisms are also introduced as both individual and organisational strategies. This enables the study to draw distinctive theoretical and practical implications.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Tritos Laosirihongthong, Dotun Adebanjo, Premaratne Samaranayake, Nachiappan Subramanian and Sakun Boon-itt

Due to the importance of efficiency and responsiveness measures rather than just efficiency measures, this research recognizes both measures when considering overall…

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1354

Abstract

Purpose

Due to the importance of efficiency and responsiveness measures rather than just efficiency measures, this research recognizes both measures when considering overall performance of warehouse operations. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to prioritize overall performance measures associated with warehouse operations in manufacturing, third-party logistics service provider and retail industry supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an integrated approach that involves the Q-sort method to group measures into four categories. Fuzzy analytical hierarchy process was then used to prioritize individual performance measures within each category and integer liner programming model was used to validate prioritized categories, using the judgment of multiple decision makers across three industries.

Findings

The result shows that the financial category is a dominating performance category in managing warehouse operations across all three industries selected. Within the financial category, cost of insurance accounted for 25 percent of total weight of the category, and is considered to be a powerful measure. The financial category is verified by multiple decision makers across three industries, as the most important performance category.

Research limitations/implications

As part of adopting the proposed methodology in practice, it needs to be guided by overall methodology appropriate for industry-specific contexts.

Originality/value

Key novel aspects of this study are to categorize warehouse operations measures and analyze their perspectives in different industries, understand dominant categories of warehouse operations measures in the contemporary supply chain and finally to explore to what extent current practices lead to achieving efficiency and responsiveness in the selected industries.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2018

Saileshsingh Gunessee, Nachiappan Subramanian and Kun Ning

The purpose of this paper is to provide quantitative evidence of natural disasters’ (NDs) effect on corporate performance and studies the mechanisms through which the…

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1298

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide quantitative evidence of natural disasters’ (NDs) effect on corporate performance and studies the mechanisms through which the supply chain moderates and mediates the link.

Design/methodology/approach

Using two major NDs as quasi-experiment, namely the 2011 Japanese earthquake-tsunami (JET) and Thai flood (TF), and data over the period 2010Q1-2013Q4, effect of these events on end assemblers’ performance is studied, with a focus on the personal computer (PC) supply chain. The moderating influence of delivery and sourcing – as supply chain flexibility and agility – are examined through end assemblers’ and suppliers’ inventory. The suppliers’ mediating role is captured as disruption in obtaining PC components through their sales.

Findings

Only JET had any negative effect, further quantified as short-term and long-term. The TF instead portrays an insignificant but positive aftermath, which is construed as showing learning from experience and adaptability following JET. Inventory matters, but differently for the two events, and suppliers only exhibit a moderating influence on the assemblers’ disaster-performance link.

Originality/value

NDs, as catastrophic vulnerabilities, are distinct from other vulnerabilities in that they are hard to predict and have significant impact. Since little is known about the impact of NDs on firm performance and how supply chain mechanisms moderate or mediate their impact, they should be distinctly modelled and empirically studied from other vulnerabilities. This paper sheds light on supply chain resilience to such events with the role of dynamic capabilities.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2018

Atanu Chaudhuri, Iskra Dukovska-Popovska, Nachiappan Subramanian, Hing Kai Chan and Ruibin Bai

The purpose of the paper is to identify the multiple types of data that can be collected and analyzed by practitioners across the cold chain, the ICT infrastructure…

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3194

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to identify the multiple types of data that can be collected and analyzed by practitioners across the cold chain, the ICT infrastructure required to enable data capture and how to utilize the data for decision making in cold chain logistics.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis based literature review of 38 selected research articles, published between 2000 and 2016, was used to create an overview of data capture, technologies used for collection and sharing of data, and decision making that can be supported by the data, across the cold chain and for different types of perishable food products.

Findings

There is a need to understand how continuous monitoring of conditions such as temperature, humidity, and vibration can be translated to support real-time assessment of quality, determination of actual remaining shelf life of products and use of those for decision making in cold chains. Firms across the cold chain need to adopt appropriate technologies suited to the specific contexts to capture data across the cold chain. Analysis of such data over longer periods can also unearth patterns of product deterioration under different transportation conditions, which can lead to redesigning the transportation network to minimize quality loss or to take precautions to avoid the adverse transportation conditions.

Research limitations/implications

The findings need to be validated through further empirical research and modeling. There are opportunities to identify all relevant parameters to capture product condition as well as transaction data across the cold chain processes for fish, meat and dairy products. Such data can then be used for supply chain (SC) planning and pricing products in the retail stores based on product conditions and traceability information. Addressing some of the above research gaps will call for multi-disciplinary research involving food science and engineering, information technologies, computer science and logistics and SC management scholars.

Practical implications

The findings of this research can be beneficial for multiple players involved in the cold chain like food processing companies, logistics service providers, ports and wholesalers and retailers to understand how data can be effectively used for better decision making in cold chain and to invest in the specific technologies, which will suit the purpose. To ensure adoption of data analytics across the cold chain, it is also important to identify the player in the cold chain, which will drive and coordinate the effort.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the earliest to recognize the need for a comprehensive assessment for adoption and application of data analytics in cold chain management and provides directions for future research.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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