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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Ann Gorry and Tom Dodd

This paper reviews the work of the national dual diagnosis programme established in England in response to recommendations for improvements in the way that services treat…

Abstract

This paper reviews the work of the national dual diagnosis programme established in England in response to recommendations for improvements in the way that services treat people with mental health problems and substance misuse issues. National policy drivers are explained, as well as the aims and achievements of the programme to date.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2010

Peter Swan

A postal survey and semi‐structured interviews were under taken with mental health day centre staff in two regions of England, investigating whether criticisms levelled at…

Abstract

A postal survey and semi‐structured interviews were under taken with mental health day centre staff in two regions of England, investigating whether criticisms levelled at buildings‐based day services are justifiable. The majority of respondents agreed with recommendations outlined in From Segregation to Inclusion (National Institute for Mental Health in England/Care Services Improvement Par tnership, 2006), believing that mental health services should ideally be based in community locations. Respondents believed that this would help to challenge stigma, facilitate community integration, and provide service users with more oppor tunities. However, concerns were expressed as to the availability of mainstream facilities and whether this approach would be suitable for all service users. Suggestions on how day services could be improved included having access to reliable sources of funding, relaxing access criteria, and having greater service user involvement.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Peter Swan

Using a case study of Artspace, a community arts and health charity, this article discusses how community‐based organisations can successfully promote the social inclusion…

Abstract

Purpose

Using a case study of Artspace, a community arts and health charity, this article discusses how community‐based organisations can successfully promote the social inclusion of people with mental illness and other disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

A research project involved a year‐long ethnographic engagement with Artspace, where the researcher participated within the organisation and worked closely with both staff and participants. It drew upon informal discussions and 43 semi‐structured interviews with participants and staff.

Findings

Social inclusion was fostered through the positive and welcoming atmosphere within the building and also through the nature of the activities themselves. There was evidence that interactions between people with and without disabilities helped to challenge negative perceptions held by both groups. Artspace also offered a safe and non‐judgemental environment for vulnerable participants whilst avoiding the downsides associated with services aimed solely at people with mental health difficulties or other disabilities.

Research limitations/implications

The case study approach was based on a single organisation and thus transferability of findings may be problematic.

Originality/value

This article has shown it is possible for a community‐based organisation to meet the needs of a wide range of people whilst maintaining a safe environment for vulnerable participants. These findings may thus be of use to similar organisations seeking to diversify their user base.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Jude Stansfield

The European Commission green paper Improving the Mental Health of the Population, published in October 2005, is essentially a public mental health strategy for the…

Abstract

The European Commission green paper Improving the Mental Health of the Population, published in October 2005, is essentially a public mental health strategy for the European Union. In this short article Jude Stansfield outlines the main elements of the strategy and discusses its relevance and implications both for the European Union as a whole and for policy and practice in England and the other individual member states. While the green paper is in many ways welcome in that it will raise the profile of public mental health at national and international government level, it has a number of flaws ‐ not least its primary focus on mental illness and mental illness services.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Hugh Middleton

Critical psychiatry appraises and comments upon psychiatric services as they are usually provided. This article, prompted by the publication of a recent book, considers…

Abstract

Critical psychiatry appraises and comments upon psychiatric services as they are usually provided. This article, prompted by the publication of a recent book, considers the place of critical psychiatry historically and in the context of contemporary mental health care and treatment.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2007

Paul Greenwood, Tony Ryan, John Keaveny and Ripu Deo

This article describes the processes undertaken to implement change in East Lancashire adult mental health services through New Ways of Working. The views of users, carers…

Abstract

This article describes the processes undertaken to implement change in East Lancashire adult mental health services through New Ways of Working. The views of users, carers and staff of the services at the start of the project are described, and an overview offered of the development work that took place to support the change. Barriers to change are also described.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Gemma Stacey and Lorraine Rayner

This paper describes how psychosocial interventions (PSI) have been integrated into an undergraduate mental health nursing programme. The first part of the paper provides…

Abstract

This paper describes how psychosocial interventions (PSI) have been integrated into an undergraduate mental health nursing programme. The first part of the paper provides the broad context of PSI in nurse education and justifies the need to incorporate skills for PSI into the undergraduate nursing curriculum. A variety of educational theories and research are presented, which have informed the development, structure and delivery of the skills programme underpinned by PSI into the undergraduate programme. The successes and limitations of this skills programme are considered in light of the key issues and challenges concerning the integration of PSI skills into undergraduate nursing education.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Alison James, Siobhan Chadwick and David Rushforth

Support, time and recovery (STR) workers are in the vanguard of the new frontline, non‐professionally affiliated groups identified in the NHS Plan (Department of Health…

Abstract

Support, time and recovery (STR) workers are in the vanguard of the new frontline, non‐professionally affiliated groups identified in the NHS Plan (Department of Health, 2000).Since 2003, the former changing workforce programme mental health team (now part of NIMHE's national workforce programme) have facilitated the implementation of this role across England, initially through a pilot project, then an accelerated development programme (ADP). It is this latter, ongoing, programme that forms the basis of this article. The authors refer to the challenge of establishing the STR worker role in a variety of statutory, non‐statutory and independent service settings and achieving the Department of Health (DH) target of 3000 STR workers in post by December 2006. The collaborative implementation process is discussed and many issues such as performance management, measures, service user involvement, organisational (including human resources and occupational health) support, and education and training, are explored. Key learning from the process is identified, and consideration given to the future application of such a simple yet effective model for change.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2007

Sarah Hill

Sarah Hill introduces a new, regular section from the National Social Inclusion Programme (NSIP) on policy developments and best practice in social inclusion and mental health.

Abstract

Sarah Hill introduces a new, regular section from the National Social Inclusion Programme (NSIP) on policy developments and best practice in social inclusion and mental health.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Graham Turpin, Roslyn Hope, Ruth Duffy, Matt Fossey and James Seward

Despite the emergence of NICE guidelines regarding the effectiveness and appropriateness of psychological therapies for the majority of common mental health problems…

Abstract

Despite the emergence of NICE guidelines regarding the effectiveness and appropriateness of psychological therapies for the majority of common mental health problems, access to these services is still dramatically underdeveloped and uneven. Estimates of untreated problems such as depression and anxiety in primary care signal the extent of these problems and the scale of investment in new services, if these needs are to be adequately met in the future.The Department of Health's and the Care Services Improvement Partnership's (CSIP) Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme sets out a framework and a series of co‐ordinated actions, including two national demonstration sites, to begin to address these issues in England.This paper examines the origins and policy drivers that have given rise to the IAPT programme, outlines the progress to date and specifically assesses the implications for the mental health workforce of this programme. Issues addressed include the workforce profiles of existing services, career frameworks for psychological therapists, the capacity of training providers to train new and existing staff in psychological therapies and the challenges implicit in devising a workforce delivery plan to support the IAPT programme.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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