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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

MIKE BRESNEN and NICK MARSHALL

Recent interest in the UK construction sector in innovative management practices such as partnering, continuous improvement and benchmarking have raised long‐standing…

Abstract

Recent interest in the UK construction sector in innovative management practices such as partnering, continuous improvement and benchmarking have raised long‐standing questions about the transferability of new management ideas from other industrial sectors into construction. Informed in part by the author's own research into partnering in the UK, this paper sets out to explore the problems of transferring and applying new management ideas to the construction industry. However, rather than simply restricting the discussion to the perennial (and perhaps unanswerable) question of whether or not the construction industry actually is different, this paper goes much further by examining the nature of knowledge diffusion and application processes. Three main themes are highlighted and their implications assessed. First, the many inherent problems and limitations associated with relying on models of ‘best practice’ drawn from other industrial sectors. Second, the highly socialized and politicized nature of supposedly rational processes of knowledge diffusion and implementation. Third, the impact that institutional factors have on the diffusion and application of knowledge via the creation of particular industry agendas and frames of reference.

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Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 8 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2014

Stephan J. Meijers, André G. Dorée and Hans Boes

Traditional contracting often leads to claims during construction by contractors, increasing transaction costs for both parties in the form of policing and enforcement…

Abstract

Traditional contracting often leads to claims during construction by contractors, increasing transaction costs for both parties in the form of policing and enforcement costs. Partnering is widely advocated as a governance form to more cooperative relationships between client and contractor. However, partnering requires a significant investment in elaborating a specific procurement approach, and is regarded as inappropriate for small, one-off, less complex projects. Dutch municipal governments are searching for alternative solutions to increase cooperation with contractors and reduce transaction costs by applying immediate post contractual negotiations in traditionally procured projects. We studied four such municipal projects which have shown that immediate post contractual negotiations achieve the effects of partnering despite the initial traditional procurement procedures. These negotiations seem to reduce the transaction costs of traditional procurement making them particularly applicable in smaller projects where high set up costs would not be justifiable due to their limited size, complexity, or cost.

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Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Damian Hodgson and Svetlana Cicmil

The purpose of this paper is to review the formation and evolution of the “Making Projects Critical” movement in project management research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the formation and evolution of the “Making Projects Critical” movement in project management research.

Design/methodology/approach

Retrospective and discursive paper.

Findings

Reflections on tensions and challenges faced by the MPC movement.

Originality/value

The paper establishes the historical trajectory of this movement and clarifies the tensions and challenges faced by MPC.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Abstract

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Strategy & Leadership, vol. 47 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1981

Nick Robinson

Subcontracting has long been an integral part of most manufacturing organisations — whether for individual production jobs or for maintenance and cleaning — or even for…

Abstract

Subcontracting has long been an integral part of most manufacturing organisations — whether for individual production jobs or for maintenance and cleaning — or even for the entire manufacturing process. And the sub‐contract option is becoming increasingly attractive, so that now virtually any task can be undertaken by one subcontractor or another. But getting value for money takes a keen eye to spot the reputable operator, with adequate resources — whether for a subcontract services or production work. Take the Crook‐based company Marshall Richards Barcro. Having closed its entire manufacturing facility in 1977, the company has made extensive use of subcontractors to produce its range of tube processing and wire drawing equipment.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 81 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Nick De Viggiani

Prison social environments play an important role in the health of prisoners. How they respond to imprisonment is partially dependent upon how effectively they integrate…

Abstract

Prison social environments play an important role in the health of prisoners. How they respond to imprisonment is partially dependent upon how effectively they integrate into an institution’s social structure, learn to fit in with others and adapt to and cope with becoming detached from society, community and family ‐ hence, how they personally manage the transition from free society to a closed carceral community. This paper reports on findings of an ethnography conducted in an adult male training prison in England, which used participant observation, group interviewing, and one‐to‐one semi‐structured interviews with prisoners and prison officers. The research explored participants’ perceptions of imprisonment, particularly with regard to how they learned to adapt to and ‘survive’ in prison and their perceptions of how prison affected their mental, social and physical well‐being. It revealed that the social world of prison and a prisoner’s dislocation from society constitute two key areas of ‘deprivation’ that can have important health impacts.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2017

Abstract

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-693-8

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Elaine Bidmead, Tilly Reid, Alison Marshall and Veronica Southern

Telemedicine has enabled speech and language therapists (SLTs) to remotely assess swallowing difficulties (dysphagia) experienced by nursing home residents. The new…

Abstract

Purpose

Telemedicine has enabled speech and language therapists (SLTs) to remotely assess swallowing difficulties (dysphagia) experienced by nursing home residents. The new technique, “teleswallowing”, was designed by the Speech and Language Therapy Service at Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. It allows prompt assessment, avoiding potential risks of aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, poor rehabilitation, increased hospital stays and reduced quality of life (Hinchey et al., 2005; Langmore et al., 1998). The purpose of this paper is to report on a second pilot of teleswallowing and the concomitant adoption study.

Design/methodology/approach

The adoption study employed qualitative methods, including consultations with senior managers, semi-structured interviews with nursing home matrons/managers and nurses, two focus groups and semi-structured interviews with SLTs. The project clinical lead kept an activity log, which was used to estimate resource savings.

Findings

Over a three-month period, six SLTs and 17 patients in five nursing homes participated in teleswallowing assessments. Teleswallowing benefited both patients and participating nursing homes. Better use of therapist time and cost savings were demonstrated and evidence showed that the service could be successfully scaled up. Despite this, a number of barriers to service transformation were identified.

Originality/value

This is the first implementation of teleswallowing in the UK, but it has been used in Australia (Ward et al., 2012). The approach to engaging stakeholders to understand and address barriers to adoption is novel. The value lies in the lessons learned for future innovations.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Book part
Publication date: 11 October 2019

David Beer

Abstract

Details

The Quirks of Digital Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-916-8

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2010

Rebecca Checkley, Nick Hodge, Sue Chantler, Lisa Reidy and Katie Holmes

This paper focuses on accessing the experiences of three boys who are on the autism spectrum to identify what using a voice output communication aid (VOCA), within a…

Abstract

This paper focuses on accessing the experiences of three boys who are on the autism spectrum to identify what using a voice output communication aid (VOCA), within a classroom setting, means to them. The methods used to identify the boys' perspectives are described and evaluated. Establishing these through direct methods of engagement proved problematic but working with parents and school staff as ‘expert guides’ provided a rich insight into what using a VOCA appeared to mean to the boys. The findings suggest that using a computer‐based VOCA can be viewed by children with autism as a pleasurable and motivating activity. This technology also seems to offer the potential for a much broader developmental impact for these children than that currently recognised within the research literature.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

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