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1 – 10 of 202
Article
Publication date: 12 November 2020

Louise Griffiths, Di Bailey and Karen Slade

Without exception, research on the contribution of the Prison Listener Scheme as a form of peer support for those who self-harm in custody has focussed on men in prison…

Abstract

Purpose

Without exception, research on the contribution of the Prison Listener Scheme as a form of peer support for those who self-harm in custody has focussed on men in prison. Women’s experience of custody is shaped by their experiences of hegemonic masculinity that also mediate through women’s roles as mothers and caregivers. Women’s self-harm is similarly influenced by these gendered experiences. The purpose of this paper is to explore how the Listener Scheme as a form of peer-to-peer support for women contributes to women managing their self-harm in a female prison.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used a case study design with a mixed-methods approach using a quantitative questionnaire with prison staff (n = 65) and women in custody who had self-harmed (n = 30). Qualitative methods included a focus group with Prison Listeners (n10) and semi-structured interviews with women who self-harm (n10) and prison staff (n10). Four days were also spent observing the prison environment.

Findings

Findings suggest that women seek support from other women as peer Listeners for three main reasons; their previous difficult experiences with men, a displacement of the mother role and their attachment needs in custody. Research suggests that women often have significant addictions and mental health concerns and are more likely than their male counterparts to engage in self-harm (Prison Reform Trust, 2017). In addition, women’s self-harm acts as a coping method for “intrapersonal issues” which documents self-harm as a result of frustration and lack of control in custody as opposed to “interpersonal issues” which documents self-harm as a result of relationship difficulties with partners (Walker et al., 2017). This paper suggests that peer support schemes internationally should be tailored to providing support for these types of gendered experience to support women who self-harm in custody. This has implications for the training and support of Listeners in women’s prisons.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory research was conducted in one female prison and while can be considered to test proof of concept is limited in its generalisability.

Originality/value

This paper suggests that Listeners providing peer-to-peer support for women in custody who self-harm may encounter triggers for this behaviour based on women’s experiences including; how women relate to men; women’s experience of the way custody displaces their role as mothers and women’s need for safe attachments in custody. These gendered experiences have implications for the training and development of peer support schemes in women’s prisons, such as the Listener scheme. Further research is needed to compare the gendered types of support Prison Listeners provide depending on whether they are in male or female prisons.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Bodo Müller, Martin Schubert and Gudrun Kinet

A lamellar zinc pigment reacts in aqueous alkaline media (e.g. water‐borne paints) with the evolution of hydrogen. This corrosion reaction can be inhibited by certain…

Abstract

A lamellar zinc pigment reacts in aqueous alkaline media (e.g. water‐borne paints) with the evolution of hydrogen. This corrosion reaction can be inhibited by certain surfactants. The most important structural part of the examined surfactants is the hydrophilic group; only anionic phosphate or phosphonate hydrophilic groups are effective corrosion inhibitors. Surfactants with carboxylate, sulfonate, amphoteric, cationic and non‐ionic hydrophilic groups are ineffective. There seems to be also an influence of the hydrophobic group of the surfactants because a partial ester of phosphoric acid with a fluorinated hydrophobic group was the most effective corrosion inhibitor in this study.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Rusli Ahmad and Nur Azman Ali

This article explores raters' understanding on the decision‐making process in the public service performance appraisal system (PAS) by looking at the cognitive processing…

9396

Abstract

This article explores raters' understanding on the decision‐making process in the public service performance appraisal system (PAS) by looking at the cognitive processing models (CPM) steps involved. Presents the results of semi‐structured cognitive mapping interviews undertaken with novice raters in the Malaysia public service (MPS) context. Interviews were conducted using cognitive mapping protocol. The resultant causal cognitive maps explored findings from CPM applied in appraisal decision making. Explains the performance appraisal process and theoretical framework for the CPM. From the research findings, it is clear that raters recognised the CPM steps in their performance appraisal practice. The study also identifies individual differences in novice raters' CPM in terms of concepts and complexity. The findings are used to validate the CPM concepts suggested in related literature. Finally, the study discusses the implications of CPM in a broader context of performance appraisal decision‐making process.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1979

This article is based on extracts from a booklet Careers in Nursing and other health service professions 1979 which is obtainable price 90p (post paid) from The New…

Abstract

This article is based on extracts from a booklet Careers in Nursing and other health service professions 1979 which is obtainable price 90p (post paid) from The New Opportunity Press Ltd., 76 St. James's Lane, London N10 3RD.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 21 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2021

B M Razzak, Robert Blackburn and George Saridakis

This paper investigates the linking between employees' working life (EWL) and job performance of ethnic minority Bangladeshi restaurants in Greater London.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the linking between employees' working life (EWL) and job performance of ethnic minority Bangladeshi restaurants in Greater London.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use in depth face-to-face interviews of 40 participants working in 20 Bangladeshi restaurants (BRs) following a convenience sampling method. A thematic analysis technique, with the help of QSR N10, developed two key themes related to EWL and performance.

Findings

These themes highlight several aspects of the relationship between EWL and performance. First, EWL is “beyond” the UK tradition; employers show a domineering attitude; however, employees continue to work due to lack of skills and competence. Second, employees perceive and present themselves as satisfied; however, this satisfaction is not reflected in the business performance of BRs. Third, the analysis shows that business owners “trap strategy” constrains employees to develop their skills for mobility to other industries. Hence, employees express satisfaction with their existing situation on the basis that it is the best they can hope for, given their specific skills and competence, and need for some security in the UK. Fourth, non-financial performance, for example, job autonomy, sense of fulfilment is related to EWL.

Practical implications

The paper provides a framework to promote a better understanding of the linking between employees' working life and performance of UK ethnic minority restaurants. Also, the paper makes recommendations for further research, including an examination of the applicability of the findings to SMEs operated by other ethnic groups in the UK.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the scarce literature on the working life of people in Bangladeshi restaurant businesses in the UK and the relationship between EWL and business performance.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Innocent I. Ekoja

Presents a descriptive/survey research using a questionnaire and official records to investigate alternative sources of generating income in Nigerian university libraries…

580

Abstract

Presents a descriptive/survey research using a questionnaire and official records to investigate alternative sources of generating income in Nigerian university libraries. The sales made are of duplicate journals and back issues of newspapers while commercial services identified are photocopying, publishing, registration of users and binding. Other sources of income are fines, charges, gifts, grants, endowments, bequests and adopt‐a‐journal. The range of total percentage of alternative income in relation to total library allocations is between 0.7 and 39.2 per cent but on average it is a minimum of 5.4 per cent and maximum of 17.6 per cent. Book gifts by foreign donors are greater than those from Nigerians, and when quantified in monetary terms bring in far more funds than any other means of alternative income.

Details

Library Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Innocent I. Ekoja

Reports a survey which investigated the funding of library research in six federal government owned universities in Nigeria, and the impact of research funding on the…

Abstract

Reports a survey which investigated the funding of library research in six federal government owned universities in Nigeria, and the impact of research funding on the publication output of librarians. Findings indicate that research is either self‐funded, or funded by the respondents’ employers, and an insignificant number have been funded by international agencies. Grants are given for postgraduate degree and personal research. About half the respondents see the research grants they receive to be either fairly adequate or adequate: but the majority expressed dissatisfaction with their research allowances. All agreed that enhanced research grants and allowances would lead to a greater research output. Most publications produced by the respondents resulted from self‐funded research, followed by research sponsored by grants from employers, and lastly from researches funded by foundations, agencies and associations.

Details

Library Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Jane Dorner

This paper suggests that computer manipulation of written material is insubstantial. Despite the huge choice of electronic writing aids, few match up to what is required…

Abstract

This paper suggests that computer manipulation of written material is insubstantial. Despite the huge choice of electronic writing aids, few match up to what is required by professional writers, editors or translators. The creation of texts on screens further desubstantiates the written word and forces copyright owners to redefine the ‘copy’ as a unit of sale. One of the many challenges facing those involved in publishing is to make provision for the implications of presenting and displaying work in electronic form.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2013

Xingling Tian, Naisheng Li, Zhiguo Zhang, Xu Chen, Yang Wang and Wolfgang Peter Weinhold

The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of restoration of gold foils on Dazu Grottoes using different parylene coatings.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of restoration of gold foils on Dazu Grottoes using different parylene coatings.

Design/methodology/approach

The gold foil samples were applied with two types of parylene coating with six different thicknesses, C‐10, C‐15, C‐20, N‐10, N‐20, N‐25, respectively. Electrochemical impedance, surface morphology, and hydrophobicity properties were used to examine the behavior of the coatings.

Findings

The results showed that an increase in electrochemical corrosion resistance was observed as the degree of coating thickness was increased for both C‐parylene and N‐parylene coatings. In addition, the surface morphology study, using 3D topography measurement, indicated that the surface roughness was decreased for all parylene coatings. Furthermore, the parylene‐C coating was comparatively more effective than was the parylene‐N coating.

Originality/value

The results obtained from the three methods were in close agreement. This is an indication that the parylene‐C coating can be used to restore the gold foils on Dazu Grottoes and to support future restoration and consolidation to be applied on site on the Grottoes.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 60 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Brett Coombs-Goodfellow and Mark Eshwar Lokanan

This paper aims to examine the influence Jones’ Moral Intensity Model (1991) has on the decision-making process of anti-money laundering (AML) compliance officers charged…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence Jones’ Moral Intensity Model (1991) has on the decision-making process of anti-money laundering (AML) compliance officers charged with reporting suspicious money laundering transactions in Jersey.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten interviews were conducted to elicit participants’ views on the six dimensions of moral intensity and their influence on the compliance officers’ decision to submit a suspicious activity report (SAR) of potential money laundering.

Findings

The findings indicate that the officers’ moral intensity to submit a SAR seems to be heavily influenced by issue-specific contextual factors. Contexts (legal and legislative mandates) seem to have more of an effect on the moral intent and actions of the officers rather than directly affecting the decision to submit a report of a suspicious money laundering transaction.

Research limitations/implications

The paper lays the groundwork for further work in this area and calls on researchers to develop instruments that can enhance the measurements of the dimensions of moral intensity.

Practical implications

The setting (AML in the financial sector) is both timely and extremely interesting to keep studying, particularly in Jersey because of its dubious sensitive particularities.

Originality/value

The study is the first to examine Jersey AML sector through the lens of moral intensity. In this sense, the paper poses interesting questions, namely, to explore the dynamic complexities experienced by compliance officers in Jersey to detect and report suspicious money laundering activities and the decision-making criteria of actually submitting a SAR.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

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