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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

N.P. Badgujar, Y.E. Bhoge, T.D. Deshpande, B.A. Bhanvase, P.R. Gogate, S.H. Sonawane and R.D. Kulkarni

– The present work aims to deal with ultrasound-assisted organic pigment (phthalocyanine blue and green) dispersion and its comparison with the conventional approach.

Abstract

Purpose

The present work aims to deal with ultrasound-assisted organic pigment (phthalocyanine blue and green) dispersion and its comparison with the conventional approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Ultrasound is expected to give beneficial results based on the strong shear forces generated by cavitational effects. The dispersion quality for preparation using an ultrasound-based method has been compared with dispersion obtained using high-speed dispersion mill. Effects of different operating parameters such as probe diameter and use of surfactants on the physical properties of dispersion and the colour strength have been investigated. Calculations for the energy requirement for two approaches have also been presented.

Findings

The use of sodium dodecyl sulphate and Tween 80 surfactants shows better performance in terms of the colour properties of dispersion prepared in water and organic solvent, respectively. Ultrasound gives better dispersion quality as compared to the conventional approach.

Originality/value

The present work presents a new approach of ultrasound-assisted dispersion of phthalocyanine blue and green pigments. Understanding into the effect of surfactants and type of solvent also presents new important design-related information.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Tâmara Machado Fagundes da Silva, Luciano Costa Santos and Cláudia Fabiana Gohr

Studies addressing barriers to implement lean production (LP) from the perspective of risk management (RM) have not been so usual in the literature. Re-interpreting…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies addressing barriers to implement lean production (LP) from the perspective of risk management (RM) have not been so usual in the literature. Re-interpreting barriers to lean as potential risks that should be avoided or mitigated, this paper aims to identify and categorise risks in the implementation of LP to propose a framework, which provides an overview of risks that negatively influence this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a systematic literature review exploring papers in the Web of Knowledge database, 69 papers were selected. A descriptive analysis was first carried out to identify the evolution in the number of papers, usual terminologies, research methods, analytic tools and the RM phases approached by each paper. After that, an in-depth study of the paper sample was conducted to find risk factors and categories.

Findings

The authors found a list of 61 risk factors. Then, considering the sources of the identified risk factors, six broad categories of risks were defined, namely, top management risks, human resources risks, lean knowledge risks, technical risks, supply chain risks and cultural risks. The authors also defined 34 subcategories, resulting in a risk classification framework.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the review, the authors identified literature gaps and provided a research agenda. A noteworthy research limitation is that the authors only selected papers about LP, so the authors might have missed some potential risks in lean implementation that may arise from other-related areas. Thus, the exploration of lean risks adopting other perspectives may constitute a promising pathway for further research.

Practical implications

The classification framework may help practitioners and researchers in risk identification, evaluation and mitigation. It can also enable the creation of response plans to risks in lean production implementation, as it indicates the potential risks that may be faced along with this process.

Originality/value

This study contributed to add the perspective of RM to the literature on lean implementation. The introduction of RM concepts and tools may generate more robust models of lean implementation. Therefore, the classification framework may represent a starting point to produce new knowledge about this research topic.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2018

Sepideh Yosefzadeh Sani, Sayed Ali Mortazavi, Zahra Sheikholeslami, Mehdi Karimi and Amir Hossein Elhamirad

In the past decades, the desire to use natural source foods has increased because of environmental compatibility, safety and appropriate costs. Sonication is used in food…

Abstract

Purpose

In the past decades, the desire to use natural source foods has increased because of environmental compatibility, safety and appropriate costs. Sonication is used in food industry owing to its short duration of process and saving energy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of various maize starches in the batter on the oil absorption and quality assessment (moisture content) of chicken nuggets by using five mathematical models.

Design/methodology/approach

To determine the effects of different maize starches on oil absorption parameters, 5 per cent starches native, sonicated starch were substituted in batter instead of wheat flour. Suspensions contained native starch were treated with sonication (70 kHz, 5 min) using an ultrasound probe set. Samples were fried in a fryer at 150, 170 and 190°C for 1, 3and 5 min, respectively. Models were compared with R2 and Arrhenius equation for estimating model prediction sufficiency.

Findings

Obtained results represented that between different formulated samples, maize starch with high temperature had main significant effect (p < 0.05) on moisture content of nuggets. During frying, the amount of oil loses significantly (p < 0.05) depended on temperature and time and sonication treatment.

Originality/value

Incorporation of sonication with maize starch at higher temperature on quality assessment has not been found.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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