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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Jennifer Whyte and Dino Bouchlaghem

Use of new technologies, such as virtual reality (VR), is important to corporations, yet understanding of their successful implementation is insufficiently developed. In…

Abstract

Use of new technologies, such as virtual reality (VR), is important to corporations, yet understanding of their successful implementation is insufficiently developed. In this paper a case study is used to analyse the introduction of VR use in a British housebuilding company. Although the implementation was not successful in the manner initially anticipated, the study provides insight into the process of change, the constraints that inhibit implementation and the relationship between new technology and work organization. Comparison is made with the early use of CAD and similarities and differences between empirical findings of the case study and the previous literature are discussed.

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Construction Innovation, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

JENNIFER WHYTE, DINO BOUCHLAGHEM and TONY THORPE

Organizational issues are inhibiting the implementation and strategic use of information technologies (IT) in the construction sector. This paper focuses on these issues…

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2712

Abstract

Organizational issues are inhibiting the implementation and strategic use of information technologies (IT) in the construction sector. This paper focuses on these issues and explores processes by which emerging technologies can be introduced into construction organizations. The paper is based on a case study, conducted in a major house building company that was implementing a virtual reality (VR) system for internal design review in the regional offices. Interviews were conducted with different members of the organization to explore the introduction process and the use of the system. The case study findings provide insight into the process of change, the constraints that inhibit IT implementation and the relationship between new technology and work patterns within construction organizations. They suggest that (1) user‐developer communications are critical for the successful implementation of non‐diffused innovations in the construction industry; and (2) successful uptake of IT requires both strategic decision‐making by top management and decision‐making by technical managers.

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Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 9 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2007

M. Shelbourn, N.M. Bouchlaghem, C. Anumba and P. Carrillo

The twenty‐first century is now seen as the time for the construction industry to embrace new ways of working if it is to continue to be competitive and meet the needs of…

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5169

Abstract

Purpose

The twenty‐first century is now seen as the time for the construction industry to embrace new ways of working if it is to continue to be competitive and meet the needs of its ever demanding clients. Collaborative working is considered by many to be essential if design and construction teams are to consider the whole lifecycle of the construction process. Much of the recent work undertaken on collaborative working has focused on the delivery of technological solutions with a focus on web (extranets), CAD (visualisation), and knowledge management technologies. However, it is now recognised that good collaboration does not result from the implementation of information technology solutions alone, the organisational and people issues, which are not readily solved by pure technical systems, need also to be resolved. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Work discussed in this paper brings together the benefits provided by technology, with organisational issues, and people issues, in developing a framework to implement effective collaboration. The research uses a literature search, semi‐structured interviews and a questionnaire to gain the industry's requirements for effective collaboration in the construction sector. From these requirements a develop‐test‐refine approach was taken to develop the methodology for effective collaborative working for construction.

Findings

The findings reported in this paper are a summary of the results from the semi‐structured interviews and questionnaire used to gain the industry's requirements. They show that a focus on the “softer” issues (business process and an organisations' people) rather than a technology focus is needed to plan and implement collaborative working more effectively in projects. An initial approach is discussed in this paper concerning a structured approach to be developed further in the research to highlight to the industry the issues associated with the planning and implementation of effective collaborative working in projects.

Originality/value

This paper uses a socio‐technical approach to the planning and implementation of effective collaborative working in construction. It combines technology with the people and business aspects of collaborative working to provide an approach which can enable stakeholders in a project to benefit fully from having a collaborative working approach to their projects.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

D. Ruikar, C.J. Anumba, A. Duke, P.M. Carrillo and N.M. Bouchlaghem

This paper has the purpose of exploring the use of the semantic web to support project information management. It aims to discuss the development of a semantic web based…

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3464

Abstract

Purpose

This paper has the purpose of exploring the use of the semantic web to support project information management. It aims to discuss the development of a semantic web based framework for shared definitions of terms, resources and relationships within a construction project. These can be used to help and support intelligent collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the scope of using the semantic web to manage information management processes in the construction industry. It develops the hypothesis that information can be managed using appropriate tools and techniques and develops a roadmap that shows the way in which a solution can be achieved.

Findings

The discussion provides information on the technology that can be used to manage construction project information and the development of ontology is provided in detail.

Originality/value

The paper makes an original contribution of exploring an area (information management tools and techniques) that is at the forefront of discussion in academe and industry in the UK.

Details

Facilities, vol. 25 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2020

Mariangela Zanni, Kirti Ruikar and Robby Soetanto

Sustainability considerations are often treated as an add-on to building design, following ad-hoc processes for their implementation. The purpose of this study was to…

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252

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability considerations are often treated as an add-on to building design, following ad-hoc processes for their implementation. The purpose of this study was to investigate, model and facilitate the early stages of building information modelling (BIM) enabled sustainable building design (SBD) by formalising the ad-hoc working relationships of the best practices in order to standardise the optimal collaboration workflows.

Design/methodology/approach

Four stages of data collection were conducted, including a total of 32 semi-structured interviews with industry experts from 17 organisations. Fourteen “best practice” case studies were identified, and roles and responsibilities, resources, information exchanges, interdependencies, timing and sequence of events and critical decisions were examined.

Findings

The research classified the critical components of SBD into a framework utilising content and thematic analyses. These components were coordinated explicitly into a systematic process, which followed concurrent engineering (CE) principles utilising Integrated DEFinition (IDEF) 3 structured diagramming technique. Then, Green BIM Box (GBB) workflow management prototype tool was developed to analyse communication and delivery of BIM-enabled SBD in a centralised system.

Originality/value

This study represents an improvement to previous attempts to systematically define the BIM-enabled SBD process for the early stages. The results support the idea that a transparent SBD process, which follows specified communication patterns, can assist in achieving sustainability efficiently in terms of time, cost and effort.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Huiping Shang, Chimay J. Anumba, Dino M. Bouchlaghem, John C. Miles, Mei Cen and Mark Taylor

The paper proposes addressing the design and implementation of a web‐based risk assessment system that enables remote project team members to assess the risks at the…

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2586

Abstract

Purpose

The paper proposes addressing the design and implementation of a web‐based risk assessment system that enables remote project team members to assess the risks at the conceptual design stage.

Design/methodology/approach

The prototype system is based on a client/server architecture and uses fuzzy logic and web‐based technology. A risk assessment scenario is used to demonstrate the operation and benefits of the prototype system.

Findings

The research found that the use of a web‐based risk assessment system for distributed project team members has major benefits in terms of use of linguistic terms to express risk assessment, ease of communication, ease of maintenance, and greater consistency, among others.

Research limitations/implications

There is scope for enhancing the system through the development of a risk management module, improving the user interface and making specific provisions for different project types.

Practical implications

The move in industry towards collaborative working practices is supported by systems such as this. Risk assessment is an important area that requires the input of all team members, if evenly distributed.

Originality/value

This paper has presented an innovative approach to risk assessment for distributed project teams. It will be of interest to all parties involved in construction projects, particularly those involved in risk assessment.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Bo Jørgensen and Stephen Emmitt

Better integration of project processes has often been identified as the key issue regarding construction performance improvement. In some countries lean construction has…

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3643

Abstract

Purpose

Better integration of project processes has often been identified as the key issue regarding construction performance improvement. In some countries lean construction has become well‐established, although there appears to be considerable diversity in the interpretation of the concept. Lean construction initially focused on production aspects, but gradually design issues have started to receive more attention and integrating construction design and production processes from a lean perspective are beginning to be addressed. The purpose of this paper is to identify some of the practical challenges underlying the implementation of approaches promoted as “lean” and compare this with published research/theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an extensive review of the literature, a multiple case‐strategy approach was used to explore the practical application of lean approaches to design and construction integration in an organisational setting. Summaries of the case studies, one from the USA and two from Denmark, help to highlight a number of pertinent issues facing practitioners and researchers.

Findings

Findings suggest that it is possible to identify a number of aspects that (in theory as well as in practice) both influence and, to various extents, limit the applicability of the lean philosophy to construction. Findings also help to emphasise the importance of a number of interdependent factors for achieving better integration, namely: value identification/specification; an appropriate project delivery framework; structuring and planning of delivery processes; transparency; management and leadership; learning; and the importance of local context.

Originality/value

The findings provide an original contribution to the integration of design and construction activities from a lean perspective. The findings are generic and could be practically applied in a variety of contexts.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

A.A. Owolabi, C.J. Anumba and A. El‐Hamalawi

Electronic product catalogues and brochures are gaining popularity, but there is little agreement on content, format, and searching methods. This limits their usability…

Abstract

Electronic product catalogues and brochures are gaining popularity, but there is little agreement on content, format, and searching methods. This limits their usability and integration with existing construction software tools. This paper examines a product‐modelling approach to delivering building product information and describes a proposed multi‐tier client‐server environment. ISO/STEP and IAI/IFC building product models are considered to facilitate representation, exchange, and sharing of product information. The proposed architecture incorporates scalability with middleware components that would provide single or few points of entry to integrated product information. This paper is part of a research project that builds on the results of related projects including Construct IT Strategy, PROCAT‐GEN, Active Catalog, COMBINE, and ARROW, towards implementing the required software components.

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Abdou Karim Jallow, Peter Demian, Andrew N. Baldwin and Chimay Anumba

The purpose of this paper is to investigate in-depth the current approach of managing client requirements in construction and to highlight the significant factors, which…

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2190

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate in-depth the current approach of managing client requirements in construction and to highlight the significant factors, which contribute to the complexity of managing the requirements in order to define a better approach.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of a leading international global built asset and engineering consultancy organization was conducted over two years. The case study was conducted principally using semi-participant observations supplemented with other qualitative data collection methods (i.e. interviews, questionnaires and document analysis). Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data.

Findings

The results highlight major factors associated with the complexity of managing client requirements information, which include: mechanisms for documentation, storage and access, distribution of requirements information between stakeholders and across lifecycle phases of a project, traceability management and the provision of effective change management incorporating dependency checking and impact analysis.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of the research is the use of an in-depth study of a single organization, which applied the same project management method across all the projects they managed. Further work is planned to develop the proposed framework fully, and develop a software platform to operationalize and evaluate its industrial applicability with construction projects.

Practical implications

The implications of this research is that a better approach to managing requirements information is needed, which will facilitate the design, construction and operations of buildings within budget and time. An integrated framework and an associated tool are suggested to implement the approach.

Originality/value

This study identifies major research gaps and problems in the architecture, engineering, construction and facilities management industry; proposes and presents Electronic Requirements Information Management framework to facilitate lifecycle management of the requirements.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Ghassan Aouad, Ming Sun and Ishan Faraj

This paper presents an argument for automating data representations within the construction sector. It questions whether full automation and integration is feasible and…

Abstract

This paper presents an argument for automating data representations within the construction sector. It questions whether full automation and integration is feasible and achievable considering the complexity of the industry and supply chain problems. The paper starts by reviewing the research in the area of information automation, modelling and integration. A research prototype, GALLICON, is used as an example to demonstrate the levels of integration and automation that may be achieved with the current generation of technology.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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1 – 10 of 186