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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

J.L. Foote, N.H. North and D.J. Houston

Hospital waiting lists are a feature of publicly funded health services that result when demand appears to exceed supply. While much has been written about surgical…

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Abstract

Hospital waiting lists are a feature of publicly funded health services that result when demand appears to exceed supply. While much has been written about surgical waiting lists, little is known about the dynamics of radiology waiting lists, which is surprising given that rational treatment, and indeed the medical profession's claim to expertise, rests on establishing a diagnosis. This paper reports the findings of a case study of a problematic ultrasound waiting list. In particular, this paper highlights how the management of the ultrasound waiting list served to subordinate the needs of waiting patients and their general practitioners to the interests and values of radiologists. Radiologist concern to protect specialist expertise from encroachment by outpatient clinicians and sonographers is implicated in the growth of the ultrasound waiting list. It is argued that an adequate understanding of ultrasound waiting lists depends on grasping how radiologists are successful in structuring problems of access in ways that enhance radiologist control over ultrasound imaging. The case study reported helps to shed light on why increasing funding to clear waiting lists proves ineffective.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

R. Mehdipour, C. Aghanajafi and A. Ashrafizadeh

The purpose of this paper is to model radiation ovens and to propose a method capable of designing this kind of oven for the paint curing application. Providing a uniform…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to model radiation ovens and to propose a method capable of designing this kind of oven for the paint curing application. Providing a uniform cure condition on the body, especially bodies of complicated geometries, needs accurately‐designed ovens. An algorithm with high speed and high convergence capability is the most serious requirement for designing ovens of this kind.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the state of the art in dynamic optimisation of radiation paint cure ovens is reviewed and a novel objective function, based on paint cure window, is proposed to be applied for designing radiation ovens. It has been shown that the proper definition of the objective function in such problems makes the mathematical model more robust and hence facilitates the convergence of the design iterations.

Findings

The computational results provide some information regarding the design space topology and show that the proposed objective function speeds up the convergence of the design procedure by an order of magnitude as compared to the currently used industrial‐standard objective function.

Practical implications

Determination of curing condition is an important requirement for designing a new oven or changing the working condition of an existing oven. In this research, a practical method is proposed for improving design procedure of cure ovens to make the method both time and cost efficient. The method is specifically implemented on paint cure ovens.

Originality/value

The quality of cured paint is usually a prominent issue that directly takes influence from the curing condition of ovens. For the complex geometries of curing body in commonly designed ovens, some areas are not properly cured or may be burnt. This issue is a significant defect in coating industry. Designing ovens with the proposed method in this paper guaranties the provided curing condition by the oven and therefore the curing quality.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Nicola North and Frances Hughes

Recent New Zealand reports have identified the nursing workforce for its potential to make a significant contribution to increased productivity in health services. The…

3193

Abstract

Purpose

Recent New Zealand reports have identified the nursing workforce for its potential to make a significant contribution to increased productivity in health services. The purpose of this paper is to review critically the recent and current labour approaches to improve nursing productivity in New Zealand, in a context of international research and experience.

Design/methodology/approach

An examination of government documents regarding productivity, and a review of New Zealand and international literature and research on nursing productivity and its measurement form the basis of the paper.

Findings

It is found that productivity improvement strategies are influenced by theories of labour economics and scientific management that conceptualise a nurse as a labour unit and a cost to the organisation. Nursing productivity rose significantly with the health reforms of the 1990s that reduced nursing input costs but impacts on patient safety and nurses were negative. Current approaches to increasing nursing productivity, including the “productive ward” and reconfiguration of nursing teams, also draw on manufacturing innovations. Emerging thinking considers productivity in the context of the work environment and changing professional roles, and proposes reconceptualising the nurse as an intellectual asset to knowledge‐intensive health organisations.

Practical implications

Strategies that take a systems approach to nursing productivity, that view nursing as a capital asset, that focus on the interface between nurse and working environment and measure patient and nurse outcomes are advocated.

Originality/value

The paper shows that reframing nursing productivity brings into focus management strategies to raise productivity while protecting nursing and patient outcomes.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

George Boak, Ruth Sephton, Elaine Hough and Ruth ten Hove

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a process change in physiotherapy services and to explore factors that may have influenced the outcomes.

1265

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a process change in physiotherapy services and to explore factors that may have influenced the outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a multiple case study and information was gathered from eight physiotherapy teams over 24 months.

Findings

The process change was successfully implemented in six teams. It had a clear, positive effect on service quality provided to patients in three teams. Whilst quality also improved in three other teams, other issues make changes difficult to assess. Factors that enabled process change to be effective are suggested.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on results achieved by only eight English teams.

Practical implications

This process change may be appropriate for other teams providing therapy services if attention is paid to potential enabling factors, and a learning approach is adopted to designing and introducing the change.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no other longitudinal process change study in therapy services has been published.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Laura Madden, Blake D. Mathias and Timothy M. Madden

This paper aims to explore the relationships among perceived organizational support, positive relationships at work and intent to turnover through a social exchange theory…

3370

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relationships among perceived organizational support, positive relationships at work and intent to turnover through a social exchange theory lens. The main contribution of this paper is the investigation of different types of positive workplace relationships on employee withdrawal behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

A 49-item survey was developed through a review of literature related to positive workplace relationships and intent to turnover. Surveys were made available to 200 healthcare employees; 73 surveys were accurately completed and used to test a mediated model of positive relationships at work.

Findings

Positive relationships at work were found to have a mediating effect between perceived organizational support and intent to turnover. Additionally, perceived organizational support was found to have direct and indirect effects on intent to turnover.

Practical implications

Managers can affect employees’ intentions to turnover by improving practices that provide support to employees and encouraging positive relationships with coworkers. Additional literature related to our variables of interest suggests that employees perceive more support when their organizations offer commensurate rewards, opportunities for growth and participation in decision making.

Originality/value

This study speaks to those researchers and managers interested in employees’ motivations for staying in or leaving from their organizations. Turnover and related withdrawal behaviors are expensive for organizations, so discovering the factors that members value offers organizations the ability to affect their members’ intentions to turnover. Additionally, the exploration of relationships between perceived organizational support and positive relationships at work suggests that different support mechanisms play different roles in affecting organizational and individual outcomes.

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Aaron Cohen and Ronit Golan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of prior absenteeism, demographic variables, and work attitudes (job satisfaction, perceptions of health, and work…

8111

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of prior absenteeism, demographic variables, and work attitudes (job satisfaction, perceptions of health, and work commitments forms) on absenteeism and turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a longitudinal survey. The questionnaire used established scales of the research instruments. The sample was composed of 119 female employees working in five long term nursing facilities in northern Israel.

Findings

The findings showed a strong effect of prior absenteeism on later absenteeism. They also showed that among work attitudes, job satisfaction is a strong predictor of absenteeism, while commitment forms, particularly organizational commitment, are related to turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Using a survey questionnaire for collecting most of the data might cause common method error.

Practical implications

The findings of this study shed some more light on important work outcomes in general and in the health care industry in particular. Increasing job satisfaction and organizational commitment seem to be good strategies for reducing absenteeism and turnover intentions, as the findings here suggested. A higher rate of absenteeism provides an early indication of a withdrawal process among employees, and the organization should treat such information as more than just data on absence rates.

Originality/value

Very few papers have used a longitudinal design examining the effect of both prior absenteeism and work attitudes on turnover intentions and actual absenteeism.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Ana Shetach and Ohad Marcus

The purpose of this paper is to investigate into the relationships among citizenship behavior within medical and nursing teams, cooperation among these teams within…

1154

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate into the relationships among citizenship behavior within medical and nursing teams, cooperation among these teams within hospital units and job satisfaction of members of those teams.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered via questionnaires, administered to 107 doctors and nurses of a small hospital in Israel, regarding their job satisfaction, their evaluation of the citizenship behavior within their own professional team (medical or nursing) and the extent of cooperation of their own team with the other professional team. Preacher and Hayes’s mediation analyses were carried out on the data.

Findings

The findings show that medical–nursing cooperation mediates the relationship between citizenship behavior within the professional team (medical or nursing) and job satisfaction. When analyzed separately for doctors and nurses, results show that job satisfaction is predicted by the cooperation between the medical and nursing staff within hospital units, for nurses only. Citizenship behavior is shown to predict job satisfaction for each of the two professional sectors. Although for nurses, both factors affect their levels of job satisfaction, whereas for the doctors, cooperation affects citizenship behavior within the medical team, which, in turn, affects their job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The research sample is small and culturally specific, thus limiting the generalization potential of this study.

Originality/value

The unique nature of teamwork within hospital departments is hereby investigated. The findings shed light on a critical issue of hospital human resource management, which has not been previously investigated, and may have practical implications regarding hospitals’ overall management policies.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 January 2020

Valérie Boudrias, Sarah-Geneviève Trépanier, Annie Foucreault, Clayton Peterson and Claude Fernet

Job demands can contribute to nurses’ turnover intention and this can have an impact on health services among the general population. It appears important to identify the…

1619

Abstract

Purpose

Job demands can contribute to nurses’ turnover intention and this can have an impact on health services among the general population. It appears important to identify the work environment factors associated with turnover intention, as well as the psychological resources liable to act on this relationship. Drawing on self-determination theory (SDT), the purpose of this study (n=1179) is to investigate the relationship between two job demands (role ambiguity and role conflict) and turnover intention, as well as the moderating role of basic need satisfaction (autonomy, competence and relatedness) within these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study was conducted among nurses (Québec, Canada). Nurses completed an online questionnaire. To test the proposed moderating effect of satisfaction of the three psychological needs (i.e. autonomy, competence and relatedness) in the relationship between job demands (i.e. role ambiguity and role conflict) and turnover intention, path analysis was conducted using Mplus v.8 (Muthén and Muthen, 2017). Two models, one for each demand, were tested.

Findings

As expected, role ambiguity and role conflict are positively related to turnover intention. Results reveal a significant interaction between role ambiguity and satisfaction of the need for autonomy in the prediction of turnover intention. The satisfaction of the need for competence and the satisfaction of the need for relatedness did not moderate the relationship between role ambiguity and turnover intention. Satisfaction of the need for autonomy moderated the relationship between role conflict and turnover intention. Moreover, results revealed a significant interaction between role conflict and satisfaction of the need for competence in the prediction of turnover intention. Satisfaction of the need for relatedness did not moderate the relationship between role conflict and turnover intention.

Research limitations/implications

The results align with the theoretical propositions of several leading theories in occupational health which state that workers’ psychological functioning derives not only from the job characteristics of their work environment, but also from the psychological resources at their disposal. The study contributes to SDT. First, to date, this is the first study to investigate basic psychological need satisfaction as a moderator in the relationship between contextual factors and workers’ functioning. Second, the findings revealed the importance of assessing psychological needs separately, as each contributes in a specific way to workers’ work-related attitudes and adaptation to their professional environment.

Practical implications

Perceptions of autonomy and competence act as key psychological resources for nurses. Managerial support for autonomy (e.g. providing nurses with meaningful information regarding their work) and competence (e.g. providing nurses with frequent positive feedback regarding their work efforts) constitutes a series of key management practices that can foster perceptions of autonomy and competence. The findings show that two role stressors predict nurses’ turnover intention. As such, health care establishments are encouraged to focus on interventions that reduce uncertainties and conflicting situations from nurses (provide clear job descriptions and effective communication).

Social implications

By promoting a sense of effectiveness and feelings of self-endorsement at work, health care establishments can reduce nurses’ turnover intention and help prevent staffing shortages among this important work group.

Originality/value

Although past research shows that workers’ motivational profile can modulate the relationship between characteristics within the work environment and workers’ functioning, studying the quality of work motivation is not sufficient to completely understand the factors that can influence workers’ reactions to job demands. Need satisfaction is crucial to the development and maintenance of high quality motivation. Evaluating need satisfaction as a moderator in the stressor–strain relationship could offer a better understanding of the psychological experiences that can promote workers’ adaptation to their work environment. To date, no study has investigated the buffering role of psychological needs in the stressor–strain relationship.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

Rola Chami-Malaeb

The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of two positive organizational factors: the perceived supervisor support (PSS) and the self-efficacy (SE) on nurses'…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of two positive organizational factors: the perceived supervisor support (PSS) and the self-efficacy (SE) on nurses' burnout (BO), which concurrently affect the turnover intention (TI) and the mediating role of BO in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey-based study of a sample of 552 Lebanese registered nurses from 19 Lebanese hospitals was conducted.

Findings

The authors’ findings confirm that PSS and SE both reduce the level of BO and the turnover intention significantly. The higher the perceived supervisors' support and the nurses' SE, the less they experience BO. BO has partially mediated the relationship of the PSS and SE on TI. This study reveals that supervisors' support is well perceived by Lebanese nurses, whose s is relatively high, while their levels of BO are considered moderate. However, BO levels vary proportionally with demographic variables, namely age, work experience, gender, marital status and education.

Originality/value

This study provides new evidence on the relationship between PSS, SE and BO and turnover intention of Lebanese nurses. It is unique in studying the role of nurses' SE with regard to BO and TI and improving the quality of nurses' work life. It shows the significance of the supervisors' role in supporting the psychological state of nurses. The context of the study, Lebanon, is also novel as it differs from advanced economies institutionally, culturally and in legal frameworks that govern the employee–supervisor relationships.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2022

Martin Ahlenius, Björn Berggren, Tommy Gerdemark, Jonas Kågström and Lars-Johan Åge

The purpose of this article is to describe and analyze the occupational life cycle of Swedish real estate brokers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to describe and analyze the occupational life cycle of Swedish real estate brokers.

Design/methodology/approach

Voluntary turnover among real estate brokers could lead to occupational turnover and/or employee turnover and has been described as problematic by both practitioners and researchers alike. Most previous studies focusing on this issue have explored connections between real estate brokers' personality, economic and market conditions and turnover. Employee turnover involves shifting jobs within the profession (real estate brokerage), whereas occupational turnover concerns movement to a job not related to the real estate brokerage profession. Both perspectives on turnover are however lacking data about the average time spent as a broker. This study fills this gap by exploring real estate brokers' life cycle through data analysis using a cohort study consisting of a sample of 5,304 real estate brokers registered and/or deregistered over a ten-year period from 2010 to 2019.

Findings

The analysis show that the decline is almost linear, resulting in 50% of the newly registered real estate brokers remain in the occupation eight years after registration. These findings are not in line with previous assumptions as the real estate brokers' life cycle is substantially longer. The results also reveal that there are differences in life cycles due to gender and year of registration.

Originality/value

The analysis of longitudinal, aggregated data on the life cycle of real estate brokers is highly relevant as it serves as a point of reference for future longitudinal studies analyzing the motives for leaving the occupation.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

Keywords

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